January 1, 2013

1880 TO 1889 murder leads

this is a draft post published as backup. these are all cases I need more info on. I'm in the process of adding them to the timeline also


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Garrard. 1880? not on timeline

W. A. Arnold was indicted in the Garrard Circuit Court for the murder of one Robert Boyle

---

[] Excerpt from "Garrard County." IJ, Stanford, KY. February 4, 1881. Page 2. LOC.

[] -



---


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


1880. Pal or Pat Rogers / James R. Isaacs. Garrard. This is Jackson Co. OUTSIDE PARAMETERS

[] Excerpt from "Rockcastle - Mt. Vernon." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. April 30, 1880. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1880-04-30/ed-1/seq-2/

[April 30, 1880] -

Pal Rogers, who killed a man named Isaacs a few weeks ago in Jackson county, was in Mt. Vernon last Saturday and was near town Monday. Monday night he went to Jackson county, and Tuesday David Garrett, Deputy Sheriff of Jackson county, undertook to arrest him on a bench warrant for murder. Roger shot Garrett, killing him instantly. He is still at large. Our sheriffs had better keep shy of him. []




---

[] Excerpt from "Rockcastle." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 7, 1880. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1880-05-07/ed-1/seq-2/

[May 7, 1880] -

The report that Pat Rogers had killed the deputy Sheriff of Jackson county turns out to be false. I got my information from a Richmond dispatch in the Cincinnati Enquirer. []



---

[] Excerpt from "Garrard County - Paint Lick." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 21, 1880. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1880-05-21/ed-1/seq-3/

[May 21, 1880] -

Pal Rogers, who has had considerable notoriety of late in consequence of having killed James R. Isaacs, which event has been detailed in these columns, was arrested last Sunday evening in the neighborhood of Lynchburg, this county, by Geo. Woolwine, a Constable of Madison County, David Garret, Deputy Sheriff of Jackson county, and a posse of three. Charles Rogers, a brother of Pat, was with the latter when arrested, but was allowed to go free. It is supposed he rallied Pat's friends, who soon appeared and released Pat, having "got the drop" on the officers. Woolwine was roughly abused by Elbert Cooley, leader of the rescuing crowd, and was knocked down by a blow from a pistol in the face. The rescuers also took the arms of the officers and posse, and carried them off. Monday, Woolwine and Asa Patterson, Constable of this district, had each collected a posse and were in close pursuit of the desperadoes. The community is much incensed at the action of Cooley and his party, and there seems to be more anxiety that he be caught than Rogers. A good deal of bad blood has been engendered, and some will doubtless be spilt unless there is a surrender of all parties, and this spec of war nipped in the bud.

LATER. -- George Woolwine, the Madison County Constable whom Elbert Cooley gave a black eye last Sunday, was here Thursday. He says Cooley's party accidentally met them, and were not rallied by Charles Rogers, as reported. []


---

[] Excerpt from Column 1. The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 28, 1880. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1880-05-28/ed-1/seq-2/

[May 28, 1880] -

The best Sheriff in the State, the gallant John M. Higginbotham, of Garrard, came upon the scent of the murderer Pal Rogers this week, and after a hot chase arrested him single handed. Hurrah for Higginbotham! may he continue in the good work and have many imitators. []




---

[] Excerpt from "Garrard County - Paint Lick." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. June 18, 1880. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1880-06-18/ed-1/seq-3/

[June 18, 1880] -

Pal Rogers, who was recently indicted by the Jackson Circuit Court for the murder of James R. Isaacs, had an examining trial at McKee the other day, and allowed bail in the sum of $4,000, which he gave last Saturday and returned home. The prosecution was not able to make out as clear a case against Rogers as was inferred. []





-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Lincoln County? 1880? not on timeline

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. January 16, 1880. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1880-01-16/ed-1/seq-3/

[January 16, 1880] -

BLOODY FIGHT. -- Last Sunday, at Sam Ham's grogery, near the Green River Trestle, in this county, Sam and Enoch Upthegrove, Mac Young and Constantine Taylor met, and after frequent potations of the miserable whisky there kept, quarrelled over a cow trade, when the Upthegroves and Young attacked Taylor, and besides stabbing him three times severely, mashed his skull in with an ax, from the effects of which it is said that he will die. In the melee a bystander named Mounce received a pistol shot in the groin. All the parties were arrested, and their examining trials were held on Wednesday, resulting in the holding of the Upthegroves for malicious wounding with intent to kill in bonds of $200 and $300, which they could not give, and they are now in jail. Young's bond was fixed at $100 for aiding and abetting. He gave it and was released. []



---

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. March 12, 1880. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1880-03-12/ed-1/seq-3/

[March 12, 1880] -

MURDER. -- Constantine Taylor, the man who was so seriously cut and shot by Enoch and Sam Upthegrove, and Mae Young some time ago, died Monday of his injuries. County Attorney, W. H. Miller, thereupon changed the charge to murder, and ordered the re-arrest of the party, and the Upthegroves were taken and lodged in jail here Tuesday. Young has fled the country. The Upthegroves were taken to the Highland yesterday for an examining trial, but the case was postponed till next Tuesday, and they were returned to jail. []




---

[] Excerpt from "." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. March 19, 1880. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1880-03-19/ed-1/seq-3/

[March 19, 1880] -

THE EXAMINING TRIAL.-- Of the Upthegroves' for the murder of Constantine Taylor was called on Tuesday, but postponed until to-day to allow the doctors time to disinter the body and decide upon the immediate cause of his death. Coroner Goode held the inquest yesterday, when the physicians, Drs. Bronaugh and Moore, on examination decided that, although there was a fracture of the skull, in the immediate cause of his death was pneumonia one lung being nearly gone. The jury therefore found a verdict to that effect. []


---

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. April 23, 1880. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1880-04-23/ed-1/seq-3/

[April 23, 1880] -

The Grand Jury has returned 7 indictments, among them one against the Upthegroves, for the murder of Taylor. []



---

same case?

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. October 28, 1881. Page 3. LOC.

[October 28, 1881] -

Sam Upthegrove forfeited his bond for shooting with intent to kill. The case was continued, and a bench warrant ordered to be issued.

Sam Upthegrove, for carrying concealed weapons, was fined $25 and given ten days in jail. He did not put in an appearance. []





-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Boyle. 1880. Mock, Faulkner, Robinson / John Simpson

[] Excerpt from Column 3. The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. October 29, 1880. Page 2. LOC. 

[October 29, 1880] -

The murder of Policeman Simpson at Danville, last Friday night, was one of the most wilful and unprovoked that has disgraced our State for some time. We hope that a searching investigation will be had and speedy punishment be meted out to all who aided and abetted it. []




---

[] Excerpt from "Boyle County - Danville." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. October 29, 1880. Page 2. LOC. 

[October 29, 1880] -

John R. Simpson, a Policeman, and the best that Danville has had for many years, was murdered on Friday night about 9 1/2 o'clock, by a party yet unknown. At the same time John S. Harness, an assistant, and a negro named Powell, were wounded. Simpson and Harness warned a crowd of young white boys and some negroes, principally from Garrard county, that they might hurrah as they pleased, but must cease firing pistols as they had been doing, or they would be arrested. This they promised to do but went down on Second street near Manwarring's carriage shop and begin firing rapidly. Simpson approached the crowd and called Harness to his assistance. In the struggle that followed Simpson was killed and Harness wounded in the right arm. Just how the shooting occurred is not my province yet to say, as the matter is this morning (Wednesday) being investigated by the court. There are three persons under arrest, Wm. Mock, of Danville, John Faulkner, Jr., of Lancaster, and a negro named Robinson. Judge Lee committed an error in sending the negro to jail and allowing the white boys, Mock and Faulkner, to have a guard. The negro was in very bad company and he should have been allowed to remain in it, John R. Simpson was a man kind-hearted, honest and a faithful officer and died doing his duty, he was 46 years old was a widower and leaves six children, several quite small. (A telegram received last night says that the case has been continued till to-day.) []


---

[] Excerpt from "Boyle County." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. November 5, 1880. Page 3. LOC.

[November 5, 1880] -

Wm. Mock, of Danville, John Faulkner, Jr., of Lancaster, and Milton Robinson, colored, of Garrard county, were held to answer for the murder of John Simpson, in the exam[in]ing court on Thursday last. Bail was allowed and given for Mock and Faulkner at $1,500 each, and for Robinson at $500. The trial lasted three days and was full of interest. The attorneys for the prosecution were Robert Harding, County Attorney, Samuel Harding and Judge R. J. Breckinridge; for defense, R. P. Jacobs, George Denny, Jr., and John W. Yerkes. []



---

[] Excerpt from "Garrard County." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. November 5, 1880. Page 3. LOC.

[November 5, 1880] -

Owing to a press for time we neglected, last week, to make mention of the unfortunate position our young friend and neighbor, Johnny Faulkner, had gotten into. However, we are glad that if the conclusion of the examining court could have been no better, that it was no worse. From the statements of those who heard the trial, we learn he will have no difficulty of coming out all right at any future trial. []



---

[] Excerpt from "Boyle County." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. November 12, 1880. Page 3. LOC.

[November 12, 1880] -

Major Wm. Goodloe has been appointed City Attorney, vice W. H. Lucas resigned, and Screw Taylor night Policeman, vice John Simpson, assassinated. []

---

[] Excerpt from "Garrard County." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. February 25, 1881. Page 2. LOC.

[February 25, 1881] -

The trial of John Faulkner, Jr., for killing Marshal Simpson, in Danville, last Fall, will be tried at the present term of the Boyle Circuit Court. []


---

[] Excerpt from "Garrard County." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. March 4, 1881. Page 2. LOC.

[March 4, 1881] -

My statement in my last that John Faulkner would be tried at this term of the Boyle Circuit Court, for killing marshal Simpson, was premature. Faulkner has not been indicted yet. []




---

[] Excerpt from "Boyle County -- Danville." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. March 4, 1881. Page 3. LOC. 

[March 4, 1881] -

Wm. R. Mock and John K. Faulkner, Jr., have been indicted by the present Grand Jury for murder -- charged with killing John Simpson last October. No indictment was found against Milton Robinson, the negro boy who was held to bail in connection with these two young men by an examining court. []




---

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. September 26, 1882. Page 3. LOC. 

[September 26, 1882] -

The case of the Commonwealth vs. Mock and Faulkner, for the murder of Policeman Simpson, has been transfered from the Boyle to the Lincoln Circuit Court. The change of venue was sought because the friends of the boys feared that they would be unable to get justice in Boyle. []



---

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. October 17, 1882. Page 3. LOC.

[October 17, 1882] -

Circuit Court will convene here next Monday, and not yesterday, as many witnesses and others seemed to think, who came only to be disappointed. There are 337 cases on the docket, of which 118 are criminal. Of that number there are seven murder cases, as follows: Gresham and Reid for killing Rowsey; John W. Gooch for killing Constable Killion; Tate and McManama for causing the railroad accident, whereby five persons were killed; James Mullins for killing another negro, at the Crab Orchard circus; Froman Miner for killing John Ferrell; Mock and Faulkner for killing Policeman Simpson, of Danville, and one other case for indictment. The equity appearances number 33; motions, 7; common law, 30, and old equity, 107. []




---

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. October 24, 1882. Page 3. LOC.

[October 24, 1882] -

The trial of J. W. Gooch was set for the 5th day of the term and Mock and Faulkner's for the 13th day, Nov. 6th. []



---

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. November 7, 1882. Page 3. LOC.

[November 7, 1882] -

CIRCUIT COURT. -- But little has been done since last report. The case of Mock and Faulkner, for murder, was called yesterday and laid over till Wednesday, the Sheriff, in the meantime, being ordered to summon 25 additional jurymen. []




---

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. November 10, 1882. Page 3. LOC.

[November 10, 1882] -

CIRCUIT COURT. -- After all the trouble and extraordinary expenses of sending to distant States for witnesses in behalf of the Commonwealth, the defense plead a continuance in the case of murder against Mock and Faulkner and it was granted until March next, at which time another continuance will be granted. The law's delay is the next thing to an acquittal. []



---

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. March 27, 1883. Page 3. LOC.

[March 27, 1883] -

The Mock and Faulkner trial for the outrageous murder of Policeman Simpson, in Danville, was as it has always been since reaching the docket, continued, although it was set on the first day of this term of yesterday. The Commonwealth announced not ready and of course the defense was then very ready. The absence of an important witness R. P. Dunlap, of Kansas City, Mo., was the cause. Although he was under bond to appear and was telegraphed to by Commonwealth's Attorney Warren at his own expense with request that he answer in like manner, he had done neither at the adjournment of the court yesterday. An officer was murdered in cold blood, but it does not look like any body will suffer for it. []



---

[] "Stanford." The Courier Journal, Louisville, KY. March 27, 1883. Page 5. Newspapers.com.

[March 27, 1883] -

STANFORD.

FROMAN MINOR 


---

[] "A Slander Refuted." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 4, 1883. Page 2. LOC.

[May 4, 1883] -

A Slander Refuted.


---


[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. August 28, 1883. Page 3. LOC.

[August 28, 1883] -

ANOTHER PARDON. -- The



---

[] Excerpt from "Danville and Vicinity." The Kentucky Advocate, Danville, KY. August 31, 1883. Page 5. Newspapers.com.

[August 31, 1883] -

Governor Blackburn has issued a pardon to John Faulkner, of Garrard, who is under indictment in the Boyle Circuit Court with young Mock, for the killing of Policeman Simpson, in 1880. []




---

[] Excerpt from Column 4. The Kentucky Advocate, Danville, KY. September 7, 1883. Page 5. Newspapers.com.

[September 7, 1883] -

Last Saturday Gov. Blackburn issued a pardon to Wm. A. Mock, charged with murder of policeman John Simpson, in this city, in October, 1880. At an examining trial he was held, giving bond for $l,000 for his appearance. At the February term of the Boyle Circuit Court, in 1881, he was indicted jointly with John Faulkner, of Garrard, for the murder of John Simpson. They elected to be tried separately, and young Mock's case was called and continued from term to term in our Court, by the defense, until the February term of 1882, when a change of venue was obtained to the Lincoln Circuit Court, where it was also continued for two terms, -- once by the defendant and once by the Commonwealth.

As the public may be somewhat curious to know how young Mock's pardon was obtained, we have been at some trouble to gather the facts.The Advocate last week noted that young Faulkner had been pardoned. This was a surprise, -- and just how it was brought about





---

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Rockcastle County. Last week in March 1880. added to timeline

[] Excerpt from Column 6. The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. April 2, 1880. Page 3. LOC.

[April 2, 1880] -

A Fatal Shooting Affray occurred at J. B. Kerby & Co.'s tan-yard, in Rockcastle county, on Monday evening last. W. G. Smith, formerly of Lancaster, and Jas. Hagerty, of Louisville, the former store-keeper and the latter foreman of the tanyard, became involved in a dispute over the breaking of two lamp chimneys in Hagerty's shop by an employee Smith had sent there to barrel some refuse tallow. Hagerty had gone into the store to get some new chimneys, and angry words having passed between the two men, Hagerty advanced towards Smith, who stood behind the counter with a double-barreled shot-gun near him. When Hagerty came opposite to Smith the latter raised the weapon and fired, the muzzle almost touching Hagerty's face. The latter received the entire contents of one barrel, which entered the right corner of his mouth, tore most of the flesh from the right cheek, and came out just behind the right ear. The unfortunate man has been in semi-comatose condition since the shooting, and physicians say his recovery is almost impossible. Hagerty's wife, who resides in Louisville, was telegraphed, and arrived here Tuesday evening -- at once proceeding to the scene of the tragedy, where she arrived at 2 o'clock next morning. Smith has not been arrested yet, but efforts are being made to secure him. []


---



[] Excerpt from "Garrard County -- Paint Lick." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. April 9, 1880. Page 2. LOC.

[April 9, 1880] -

James Hagerty, foreman of J. B. Kerby & Co's tan-yard, who was recently shot by W. G. Smith, is lying in a very precarious condition, and his recovery is regarded impossible. A priest was telegraphed for Wednesday to attend him. []



---

[] Excerpt from "Garrard County -- Paint Lick." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. April 16, 1880. Page 3. LOC.

[April 16, 1880] -

An account of the shooting of James Hagerty by W. G. Smith at J. B. Kirby's & Co's tan-yard has been published in these columns. Hagerty died from the effects of his wound on Friday morning last. His remains were taken to Louisville, Saturday, for burial. He leaves a wife and five small children, the youngest a babe of only a few weeks. We learn that Hagerty's relatives, who are possessed of considerable means, will offer a large reward for the apprehension of Smith. It is presumed the Governor will offer a sum in addition. Hagerty's friends and relatives regard the deed as an unprovoked, malicious murder, and will spare no pains in endeavoring to have justice meted out to Smith. It is reported that Hagerty, in his dying moments, stated he had done nothing to provoke the shooting, but did not want Smith punished for the crime. []





-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1880. Pulaski. not on timeline.

[] Excerpt from "Notes of Current Events." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. November 19, 1880. Page 2.

[November 19, 1880] -

Buriot King killed Henry Waters at Pine Knot, Pulaski county, Saturday. They quarreled over a pint of chestnuts, when King seized an ax, dealt Waters a blow severing his spinal column, and then made his escape. []



-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Sam Campbell / Huston, Lincoln, 1881. not on timeline

[] Excerpt from "Lincoln County." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. October 7, 1881. Page 3.

[October 7, 1881] - 

Sam Campbell, whose examination was had at McKinney on Saturday, on the charge of killing Huston, was adjudged justified. []




-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Conn / McCoy. 1881? Lincoln. not on timeline

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. Oct 28, 1881. Page 3.

[October 28, 1881] -

The trial of S. B. Conn, for the murder of McCoy, was set for the 8th day of the term, November 1st. []





-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. Oct 28, 1881. Page 3.

[October 28, 1881] -

The case against Wm. Gresham and John Reid, for the murder of Cam Roswey, was called, but owing to the absence of an important witness, was continued by the Commonwealth till the Spring term. []




-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Mullins,  White, Rains / George Adams. 1881? Lincoln. not on timeline

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. Oct 28, 1881. Page 3.

[October 28, 1881] -

The trial of the negroes, Mullins, White and Rains, for the murder of George Adams, was set for Thursday of next week. []


-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1881? this is Clay County, change of venue case. not on timeline

[] Excerpt from "." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. March 18, 1881. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1881-03-18/ed-1/seq-2/

[March 18, 1881] -

Circuit Court will convene next Monday at London, in Laurel county. The case of the Commonwealth vs. B. P. Simpson for the murder of James White will probably be again tried at this term. It will be remembered that this case has been twice tried already, and the result in each trial was a hung jury. []



---

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. July 25, 1882. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1882-07-25/ed-1/seq-3/

[July 25, 1882] -

THE LAWS DELAY.-- Bart Simpson, who several years ago, killed the County Clerk of Clay and who had four times been on trial for the offence, was acquitted at London, Friday. There were hung juries in three of the trials. The length of time since the killing and the fact that Col. W. O. Bradley was of counsel for the defense the last time, accounts for the result. Judge DeHaven, of the Shelbyville District, presided. []


---

[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon Department." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. July 25, 1882. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1882-07-25/ed-1/seq-3/

[July 25, 1882] -

In the Laurel Circuit Court last week, Judge S. E. DeHaven sitting as special judge, B. P. Simpson, charged with murder, was acquitted. He had been three times tried beforee, each trial resulting in a hung jury. Simpson killed James White, clerk of the Clay County Court, several years ago. In addition to his former strong array of counsel, he was defended at his last trial by Hon. W. O. Bradley. []



-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1880. Pulaski. added to timeline

[] Excerpt from "Notes of Current Events." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. April 30, 1880. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1880-04-30/ed-1/seq-2/

[April 30, 1880] -

A reward of $200 has been offered by the Governor for Millard Gilpin charged with murder in Pulaski. []



---

[] Excerpt from "Notes of Current Events." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 14, 1880. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1880-05-14/ed-1/seq-2/

[May 14, 1880] -

Millard Gilpin, the murderer of Givens has been caught in Pulaski. The reward offered by the State did the business. []



---

[] Excerpt from "." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. April 14, 1882. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1882-04-14/ed-1/seq-2/  Jim Gilpin, pardoned murderer??
[] Excerpt from "." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. April 20, 1883. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1883-04-20/ed-1/seq-2/ Scott Gilpin, same person?
[] Excerpt from "." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 8, 1883. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1883-05-08/ed-1/seq-2/ scott gilpin


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1881. Pulaski County. not on timeline

[] "A Gory Head Without the Body." Cincinnati Daily Gazette, Cincinnati, OH.  May 14, 1881. Page 10. Genealogybank.com.

[May 14, 1881] -


A Gory Head Without the Body.

Special Dispatch to the Cincinnati Gazette.

SOMERSET, KY., May 13. -- The dog of Mr. Gastineau, of the eastern portion of this county, brought the head of a man into his yard last evening. On examination, the head was recognized as belonging to a stock trader who disappeared in a very mysterious manner a few days ago. Decomposition had not set in. The body has not been found yet. [] 



-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1881. Pulaski.

[] "Another Kentucky Murder Mystery." Cincinnati Commercial Tribune, Cincinnati, OH.. May 28, 1881. Page 1. Genealogybank.com.

[May 28, 1881] -

Another Kentucky Murder Mystery

Special to the Cincinnati Commercial.

SOMERSET, KY., May 27 -- Yesterday while some boys were fishing near Somerset, in a small creek, the body of a man was found. His body was somewhat lacerated, and blood had oozed from his mouth and nose. He was carried to a near house and searched, but as yet no clue to the killing has been discovered. The man's name is unknown.

Three affairs of this kind have transpired in the last week. The body of Lewis Gosset was found on Tuesday, and Wm. Durham was killed by Mulony on Sunday. These affairs were, however, about the railroad and among railroad men. []


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1881. Knox. not on timeline

[] Excerpt from "The Commonwealth." The Courier Journal, Louisville, KY. September 23, 1881. Page 7. Newspapers.com.

[September 23, 1881] -

Stanford correspondence in the Danville Advocate: George and Evan Messer were put in jail here last Friday, charged with two cases of murder. In one they were allowed bail in the sum of $1,500, and in the other they were not allowed any bail. The murder was committed in Knox county, Ky., last August a year ago. One of the men killed was name Bingham. I couldn't learn the name of the other man killed. A brother of these Messers was tried at the last term of the Knox Circuit Court and sentenced to the penitentiary for seven years for these murders. He was taken to the penitentiary at the same time these prisoners were brought here. It was thought best for their safe keeping to bring them here for confinement, as other murders had been committed in Knox county, which had exasperated the people there to such an extent that it was feared that these men might either be liberated or lynched. []



-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1881? Rockcastle. not on timeline

[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon Department." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. October 28, 1881. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1881-10-28/ed-1/seq-2/

[October 28, 1881] -

James Burton, who shot and killed Samuel Edmonson at Livingston some time ago, was acquitted upon his examining trial before Esquires Pike and Calloway, last Friday, on the ground that he acted in self-defense. []


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1881. Rockcastle? not on timeline

[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon Department."  The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. December 9, 1881. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1881-12-09/ed-1/seq-3/

[December 9, 1881] -

On last Sunday morning, at Reedsville, a difficulty occurred between Wm. Roberts an old man, and one King, a young man, who had been working for Roberts, over the paltry sum of six dollars. Roberts made at King with his cane, when the latter drew his little pistol and tried to shoot the former, but the pistol happened to be out of tune and failed to fire. The latter (King), then drew his dirk and commenced to carve the old man, cutting him some several times in the abdomen and ribs, the wounds proving fatal in about half an hour. King is still in the neighborhood but has not been arrested. []






---

[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon Department." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. December 16, 1881. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1881-12-16/ed-1/seq-2/

[December 16, 1881] -

King, the man who killed Roberts, an account of which killing was published last week, has not yet been arrested. He had a consultation with his lawyer last week, and concluded to wait awhile before surrendering himself into custody. []




-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1881? Pulaski. 

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. January 31, 1882. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1882-01-31/ed-1/seq-3/

[January 31, 1882] -

DEAD. -- Tom Jasper, who was shot some time ago by W. C. Owens, in Somerset, died Sunday.



---

[] Excerpt from "Notes of Current Events." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. December 22, 1882. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1882-12-22/ed-1/seq-2/

[December 22, 1882] -

A damage suit for $10,000 has been brought against W. C. Owens at Somerset, for killing Jasper last year. []



-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1881. Lincoln or Pulaski?  not on timeline

[] Excerpt from "Notes of Current Events." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. February 4, 1881. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1881-02-04/ed-1/seq-2/

[February 4, 1881] -

William McKinney and Columbus Cass, of Pulaski county, two leading lights in the Methodist Church, settled an old feud last Mond[a]y, while working the county road. The manner was after the usual style of such settlements. Cass took an ax, and knocking McKinney down, beat his head into a jelly and fled. Cass was Superintendent of a Sunday School, but it is not likely that he will be on hand next Sunday. []




-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1881? Cobb / Decker. Rockcastle County. not on timeline


(same case? timeline doesn't fit)

[] Excerpt from "Pulaski County - Somerset." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. November 11, 1881. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1881-11-11/ed-1/seq-2/

[November 11, 1881] -

News reached this place in the early part of the week, through the city papers, of the finding of the dead body of a man named Decker. He will be remembered by man as the man who killed Chaney in this [Pulaski] county several years ago.He was tried and convicted at Mt. Vernon. His wife obtained access to his room and drugged the guards while they were sleeping and he fled. She returned and in the course of a year, disposed of all her property, and under the cover of night followed him so quietly and secretly that no clue as to her route was ever obtained; and this is the first ever heard of them to this good hour. []




---

[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon Department." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. December 2, 1881. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1881-12-02/ed-1/seq-2/

[December 2, 1881] -

A recent dispatch to the Enquirer from Frankfort states that Governor Blackburn has offered a reward of $100 each for the apprehension of Martin Cobb and Radford Cobb, indicted in the Circuit Court here for manslaughter. []


---

[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon Department." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. February 24, 1882. Page 2. LOC.

[February 24, 1882] -

Some two or three years since, two men by the name of Cobb, brothers, killed a man named Decker. All the parties lived in the Southern portion of this county. The Cobbs were tried by an examining Court and acquitted; they immediately left the county and went to Knox county, and some months ago they went to Henryville, Ind. They were indicted in this [Rockcastle] county, and a reward offered by the Governor for their arrest and conviction. Deputy Sheriff Wm. McGee and Constable Wat. Killion, of Laurel county, went out there and brought them to this place on last Wednesday. They are now in jail in default of one thousand dollars bail each. []




---

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. February 28, 1882. Page 3. LOC.

[February 28, 1882] -

FOR SAFE KEEPING. -- The Cobb Brothers recently arrested in Indiana, and brought to Mt. Vernon, for the murder of a man named Decker, some time since, were delivered to the Jailer here Friday, by Sheriff W. H. Albright and F. L. Thompson, for safe keeping. This makes six prisoners in the jail charged with murder. []




---

[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon Department." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. August 18, 1882. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1882-08-18/ed-1/seq-2/

[August 18, 1882] -

The trial of the two Cobbs, now in the Stanford jail, who are indicted for manslaughter, is set down for next Tuesday. []



---

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. August 22, 1882. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1882-08-22/ed-1/seq-3/

[August 22, 1882] -

Peter Cain, who recently made his escape from the chain gang here, after spending a few weeks with his wife, who lives in the knobs, ran off, we learn, with a Miss Cobb, of Indiana, a sister of the Cobb brothers who are in jail for murder, is now lurking in the mountains of Rockcastle county. Cain met Miss Cobb in jail when she came to visit her brothers, and it appears that it was a mutual case of love at first sight. A bench warrant has been sent to the sheriff of Rockcastle for Cain. []


---

[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon Department." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. August 25, 1882. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1882-08-25/ed-1/seq-3/

[August 25, 1882] -

Martin and Radford Cobb, who has been confined in the Stanford jail charged with manslaughter were brought here [Mt. Vernon] for trial Tuesday. For a wonder both sides were ready, a severance of the cases was had, and the trial of Martin Cobb was begun. The testimony showed a plain case of self-defense and the jury after a few moments deliberation returned a verdict of not guilty. Mr. Warren then very properly filed away the case against Radford Cobb. []



---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1882. Whitley. Bibb / Foley. not on timeline

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. April 25, 1882. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1882-04-25/ed-1/seq-3/

[April 25, 1882] -

ASSASSINATED. -- Samuel F. Bibb, son of Col. R. G. Bibb, of this county, was shot and killed by Mat Foley, at Williamsburg, a few nights since, who laid in ambush for him. It will be remembered that the two men had a difficulty last Summer, when Bibb shot Foley, after being shot by him. They had since, however, made friends, and Bibb was not suspicious of a renewal of the trouble. It is said that Foley borrowed a gun from a negro and loaded it with 65 buckshot, every one of which took effect in Bibb's body, tearing it past recognition. Foley was arrested, and is now in jail. Bibb was buried near the scene, the doctors deciding that his body could not be brought here. He lived a half hour after being shot and sent for a lawyer to arrange his business, but died before his arrival. He leaves a wife and two children. []



---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

June 1882. Pulaski County. not on timeline.


[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. June 6, 1882. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1882-06-06/ed-1/seq-3/

[June 6, 1882] -

SHOOTING AFFRAY. -- South Fork Trestle on the C.S.R.R. in this county, has been the scene of several disgraceful rows and Sunday afternoon added another to the list. Sam'l Combs and James Mounce, having filled their hides with the mean whisky to be obtained in that locality, sat down to play a game of cards. A quarrel of course ensued, when Combs drew a pistol and shot Mounce four times, inflicting wounds that are pronounced mortal. Combs, it is said, has left for parts unknown. []





---

[] Excerpt from "Pulaski County - Eubanks Station." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. June 16, 1882. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1882-06-16/ed-1/seq-2/

[June 9, 1882] -

DIED OF HIS WOUNDS. -- James Mounce, who was shot by Sam Combs, at South Fork, on the 4th inst., died Wednesday last. Combs is sheltering in parts unknown. It is said that a reward of $900 is set for his delivery to the proper authorities. The people of South Fork will sadly miss his much appreciated labors, as the sound of his hammer will be heard no more in their midst. In this, as in many other cases, whisky has robbed a wife of a husband, little children of a kind and dependent father, a village of a good workman. Truly, wine is a mocker. []



---

[] Excerpt from "Local Lore." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. August 21, 1888. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1888-08-21/ed-1/seq-3/

[August 21, 1888] -

BROUGHT BACK. -- Some time ago the sheriff of Bell county, Texas, wrote to Sheriff Newland that he was under the impression that he could spot a man there who was wanted for murder here. A correspondence developed the fact that it was Samuel Combs, who killed James Mounce at South Fork Trestle, June 4, 1882. Combs, who with his wife was living at Belton, has been keeping a little grocery and heaving himself as a good citizen. When arrested for the crime Combs acknowledged that he was the man wanted and he was lodged in jail. J. N. Menefee was appointed State's agent to go after him and started about ten days ago on his errand. Friday he returned with his man and he is now in jail. Mr. Menefee says he had no trouble in bringing him and did not use handcuffs at all. He claims that he did the killing in self-defense and that he ran away because he had no money to hire a lawyer to present his defense. From the report we printed of the affair June 6, 1882, we observe that both were drunk at the time and quarrelled over a Sunday afternoon's game of cards, when Combs drew his pistol and shot Mounce four times, inflicting wounds that proved fatal in a short time. []



---

[] Excerpt from "City and Vicinity." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. October 16, 1888. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1888-10-16/ed-1/seq-3/

[October 16, 1888] -

The case of Sam Combs, murder, was set for the 8th day; L. B. Carter, same charge, 15th day and Joe Baker, for hog stealing, 12th day. []




---

[] Excerpt from "City and Vicinity." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. October 26, 1888. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1888-10-26/ed-1/seq-3/

[October 26, 1888] -

CIRCUIT COURT. -- The trial of Samuel Combs for the murder of James Mounce was begun Tuesday evening by the selection of the following jury: L. D. Garner, Eugene Kelley, A. J. Hayden, L. K. Wells, G. D. Hopper, J. B. McKinney, N. W. DePauw, T. J. Hill, R. G. Collier, Harry Dunn, Thomas Metcalf and G. D. Wearen. It will be remembered that Combs did the killing in June 1882, immediately after which he fled to Texas, from whence he was recently brought by J. N. Menefee. The trouble occurred over a wrestle, both parties being under the influence of liquor. The Commonwealth's witnesses made out a pretty severe case of murder, but the jury after hearing the other side evidently did not believe their story, as they brought in a verdict of acquittal in less than five minutes after going to their room Wednesday night. Mr. C. C. Williams, of Mt. Vernon, assisted the Commonwealth and the prisoner was represented by Col. Welch and R. C. Warren. []


---

[ibid] Excerpt from "City and Vicinity." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. October 26, 1888. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1888-10-26/ed-1/seq-3/

[October 25, 1888] -

Deputy Dawson tells us that the jury in the Combs case were as unanimous for McCrary as they were in the conclusion that the defendant was innocent of murder. We should judge from that that it was a pretty good jury. []



-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Whitley or Pulaski? 1882. not on timeline

[] Excerpt from "Notes of Current Events." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. January 31, 1882. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1882-01-31/ed-1/seq-2/

[January 31, 1882] -

M. A. Moore, proprietor of the hotel at Williamsburg, Whitley county, shot and killed Hannibal Ross, who was making at him with a drawn knife. []



---

[] Excerpt from "State News." The South Kentuckian, Hopkinsville, KY. February 14, 1882. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86069392/1882-02-14/ed-1/seq-1/

[February 14, 1882] -

M. A. Moore shot and killed Hannibal Ross at Somerset, Ky., in self-defense. []




-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Lincoln County. 1882. John Carr / Jim Ingram and Jim Embry ?. not on timeline.

[] Excerpt from "Two Murders."  Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY.  February 14, 1882. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1882-02-14/ed-1/seq-3/

[February 14, 1882] -

The second murder is that of John Carr, a very industrious and worthy colored man, who was shot dead as he sat with his family, at his home on Dr. Montgomery's place. The shot was fired through the window, and at the Coroner's inquest held yesterday by Squire W. R. Carson, the following facts were elicited: His wife testified that the old man had just returned from a meeting at Turnersville, and was sitting playing with a little child, when the report was heard. He fell over and died immediately, seven buckshot having penetrated his head. Eleven more shot were found embedded in the wall on a line with the others. It was a first thought that the child was also shot, but upon examination it was found that only a piece of the broken glass had struck it. As nothing, pointing to the perpetrator of the murder was adduced, the inquest adjourned until to-day, hoping to find some clue to the act. []



---

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. February 17, 1882. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1882-02-17/ed-1/seq-3/

[February 17, 1882] -


Two negroes, Jim Ingram and Jim Embry, have been arrested and are now in jail for the murder of John Carr last Sunday night. The Coroner's jury has had several meetings and examined a number of witnesses, but being unable yet to find a verdict, has adjourned till Saturday. There is no direct evidence so far against either of the men arrested, though enough of suspicious circumstances have been revealed to hold them for examination. The bottom of the whole matter seems to have been in a church quarrel. John Carr, who was a respectable and honest man, and a steward in the church, objected to such penitentiary birds as Ingram and Embry, both have served terms for stealing, exercising as much church authority as they imposed on themselves, and a bad feeling had been smouldering in their breasts for some time, and there are rumors afloat that they had made threats against him. Ingram's actions on Sunday night and Monday morning are much against him, and although "he doth over much protest" his innocence, he may yet feel the halter draw. The colored people are greatly excited, and whispers of mobbing the guilty party are heard. []




-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Gresham & Reid / Rowsey. 1882? Lincoln? not on timeline

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. March 17, 1882. Page 3. LOC.

[March 17, 1882] -

four are for murder: S. B. Conn, for killing McCoy, in Garrard county; Gresham and Reid, for killing Cam Rowsey; J. W. Gooch for killing Constable Killion, and James Mullins for killing another negro. []


---

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. March 21, 1882. Page 3. LOC.

[March 21, 1882] -

The case of Gresham and Reed for the killing of Cam Rowsey, was continued for the defense on account of the absence of some of its witnesses. []


---

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. October 17, 1882. Page 3. LOC.

[October 17, 1882] -

Circuit Court will convene here next Monday, and not yesterday, as many witnesses and others seemed to think, who came only to be disappointed. There are 337 cases on the docket, of which 118 are criminal. Of that number there are seven murder cases, as follows: Gresham and Reid for killing Rowsey; John W. Gooch for killing Constable Killion; Tate and McManama for causing the railroad accident, whereby five persons were killed; James Mullins for killing another negro, at the Crab Orchard circus; Froman Miner for killing John Ferrell; Mock and Faulkner for killing Policeman Simpson, of Danville, and one other case for indictment. The equity appearances number 33; motions, 7; common law, 30, and old equity, 107. []



---

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. October 31, 1882. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1882-10-31/ed-1/seq-3/

[October 31, 1882] -

CIRCUIT COURT. -- The jury in the case of William Gresham and John Reed for the murder of Cam. Rowsey returned a verdict of acquittal, after less than ten minutes consultation. []



-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Mullins / ??. 1882? Lincoln? not on timeline

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. March 17, 1882. Page 3. LOC.

[March 17, 1882] -

four are for murder: S. B. Conn, for killing McCoy, in Garrard county; Gresham and Reid, for killing Cam Rowsey; J. W. Gooch for killing Constable Killion, and James Mullins for killing another negro. []



---

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. October 17, 1882. Page 3. LOC.

[October 17, 1882] -

Circuit Court will convene here next Monday, and not yesterday, as many witnesses and others seemed to think, who came only to be disappointed. There are 337 cases on the docket, of which 118 are criminal. Of that number there are seven murder cases, as follows: Gresham and Reid for killing Rowsey; John W. Gooch for killing Constable Killion; Tate and McManama for causing the railroad accident, whereby five persons were killed; James Mullins for killing another negro, at the Crab Orchard circus; Froman Miner for killing John Ferrell; Mock and Faulkner for killing Policeman Simpson, of Danville, and one other case for indictment. The equity appearances number 33; motions, 7; common law, 30, and old equity, 107. []



-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1882. Boyle. ? / Dick Mason

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. September 26, 1882. Page 3. LOC.

[September 26, 1882] -

A negro named Dick Mason, who lived in Danville, was shot and killed at a dance in Shelby City, Saturday night. No arrest has been made at last accounts. []



-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1882? Lincoln. Charley Foster / Eddie Bishop

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. November 10, 1882. Page 3. LOC. 

[November 10, 1882] -

The case of Charley Foster for the murder of Eddie Bishop, both of them under fifteen years of age, was called yesterday and after the best part of the day was spent in endeavoring to get a jury the Court adjourning at 4, having examined fifty men and obtained but 11 jurors, as follows: David Scott, J. G. Lynn, E. F. Gaines, R. L. White, Wm. Severance, L. L. Dawson, G. D. Hopper, H. J. Darst, W. K. Buchanan, John Anderson, J. E. Lynn. The other will probably be obtained early this morning. R. C. Warren is assisted in the prosecution by J. B. Dunlap, W. H. Miller, Judge George Denny, Jr., and Col. W. O. Bradley, and the defense is represented by Hill & Alcorn and Welch & Saufley. A large crowd of ladies were in attendance yesterday and the proceedings are evidently to be of an emotional character. Clerk James P. Bailey is assisted during the Court in his duties by those clever and accommodating young gentlemen, Judge T. P. Hill, Jr. and Joseph Briggs Paxton. []




-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1882. Tate and McManama /


[] "Terrible Railroad Accident." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. September 26, 1882. Page 3. LOC.

[September 26, 1882] -



---

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. October 17, 1882. Page 3. LOC.

[October 17, 1882] -

Circuit Court will convene here next Monday, and not yesterday, as many witnesses and others seemed to think, who came only to be disappointed. There are 337 cases on the docket, of which 118 are criminal. Of that number there are seven murder cases, as follows: Gresham and Reid for killing Rowsey; John W. Gooch for killing Constable Killion; Tate and McManama for causing the railroad accident, whereby five persons were killed; James Mullins for killing another negro, at the Crab Orchard circus; Froman Miner for killing John Ferrell; Mock and Faulkner for killing Policeman Simpson, of Danville, and one other case for indictment. The equity appearances number 33; motions, 7; common law, 30, and old equity, 107. []





-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1882? Lincoln. Froman Minor / John Ferrell

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. October 17, 1882. Page 3. LOC.

[October 17, 1882] -

Circuit Court will convene here next Monday, and not yesterday, as many witnesses and others seemed to think, who came only to be disappointed. There are 337 cases on the docket, of which 118 are criminal. Of that number there are seven murder cases, as follows: Gresham and Reid for killing Rowsey; John W. Gooch for killing Constable Killion; Tate and McManama for causing the railroad accident, whereby five persons were killed; James Mullins for killing another negro, at the Crab Orchard circus; Froman Miner for killing John Ferrell; Mock and Faulkner for killing Policeman Simpson, of Danville, and one other case for indictment. The equity appearances number 33; motions, 7; common law, 30, and old equity, 107. []


---

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. October 31, 1882. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1882-10-31/ed-1/seq-3/

[October 31, 1882] -

The cases of Froman Minor and Jas. W. Gooch, for murder, were continued till the next court. []



---

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. March 27, 1883. Page 3. LOC.

[March 27, 1883] -

CIRCUIT COURT -- MINOR CONVICTED -- The trial of Froman Minor, charged with the murder of John B. Ferrill, which commenced on Wedneaday, ended on Saturday afternoon with a verdict of life imprisonment in the penitentiary. Most of our readers will remember that the murder occurred at Milledgeville during the performance of a disreputable minstrel show by Booker Brothers on the 24th of February, 1882; that there arose a drunken row, in which Ferrill was engaged and in which Minor subsequently took a hand. The proof showed that when he went to the scene, Ferrill avowed the greatest friendship for Minor, who is said to have remarked, "that's a d--n lie; you would kill me if you got half a chance." Shortly afterwards, Minor fired two shots and in the scamper that they caused in the room the lights were extinguished. The third shot fired in the darkness, did the work, and but one witness swore directly that he saw from the flash that Minor fired it. The circumstantial evidence, however, that he did it was pretty conclusive. After the shooting Minor made himself scarce around those parts, or at least he did not show himself. Ferrill lived a number of days, and finally Minor was taken in on a $500 reward and lodged in jail here, where he has been ever since. When the case was given to the jury they reported after a lengthy consultation that they could not agree, but the Judge ordered them to make another effort, and when they returned an hour or two later they said that they had agreed, and the foreman read the verdict. The handsome features of the accused at once became dejected, but mistaking the polling of the jury when each is asked if it his verdict and replies in the affirmative for a promise to petition the Governor for his pardon, he cheered up wonderfully. On his way to jail the Sheriff, surprised at the cool manner in which be heard the verdict, asked him the reason, when he gave him the above. It was explained to him that he had made a mistake, when he seemed to become deadly sick and sent for his relatives. He swears that he will never leave that jail for the penitentiary, but will suicide first. The standing of the jury when they reported a disagreement was, we learn, 11 for hanging and 1 for a life sentence, the 11 finally going over to the one wise man. []



-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1882? Charley Fowler / ?. Lincoln? not on timeline

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. October 31, 1882. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1882-10-31/ed-1/seq-3/

[October 31, 1882] -

The grand jury indicted Charley Fowler for murder and the trial has been set for the 9th of November. []




-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1882. Garrard. Fount Tankersley / wife and daughter. not on timeline.

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. October 31, 1882. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1882-10-31/ed-1/seq-3/

[October 31, 1882] -

Fount Tankersley, the man accused of poisoning his wife and daughter near Paint Lick, Garrard county, was captured by his wife's brother to whose house he went a day or two after the crime. He is now in jail at Lancaster with the chances strongly in favor of his going by the Austin route to glory. Threats of lynching were made but it is presumed that the law will be allowed to take its course. []



-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Gooch / Killion. 1882? Lincoln? not on timeline

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. March 17, 1882. Page 3. LOC.

[March 17, 1882] -

four are for murder: S. B. Conn, for killing McCoy, in Garrard county; Gresham and Reid, for killing Cam Rowsey; J. W. Gooch for killing Constable Killion, and James Mullins for killing another negro. []



---

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. March 21, 1882. Page 3. LOC.

[March 21, 1882] -

The trial of John W. Gooch for the murder of Constable Killion, was set for the 13th day of the term, April 3d, and that of S. B. Conn, for the 8th day, March 28th. []




---

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. October 17, 1882. Page 3. LOC.

[October 17, 1882] -

Circuit Court will convene here next Monday, and not yesterday, as many witnesses and others seemed to think, who came only to be disappointed. There are 337 cases on the docket, of which 118 are criminal. Of that number there are seven murder cases, as follows: Gresham and Reid for killing Rowsey; John W. Gooch for killing Constable Killion; Tate and McManama for causing the railroad accident, whereby five persons were killed; James Mullins for killing another negro, at the Crab Orchard circus; Froman Miner for killing John Ferrell; Mock and Faulkner for killing Policeman Simpson, of Danville, and one other case for indictment. The equity appearances number 33; motions, 7; common law, 30, and old equity, 107. []




---

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. October 24, 1882. Page 3. LOC.

[October 24, 1882] -

The trial of J. W. Gooch was set for the 5th day of the term and Mock and Faulkner's for the 13th day, Nov. 6th. []




---

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. October 31, 1882. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1882-10-31/ed-1/seq-3/

[October 31, 1882] -

The cases of Froman Minor and Jas. W. Gooch, for murder, were continued till the next court. []






---

[] Excerpt from "City and Vicinity." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 1, 1891. Page 5. LOC. 

[May 1, 1891] -

FATALLY SHOT. -- In a difficulty at Kingsville this week John Wesley Gooch was shot in the right side by a fellow named Lasley from Pulaski, the ball going clear through him. The origin of the difficulty is rather obscure. Mr. Gooch, it will be remembered, killed Constable Killion at Highland 10 years ago, but was acquitted on the ground that he acted under a misapprehension of the part Mr. Killion took in a fight he was having with another man. []






------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1882. Casey. Granville Crockett / Milton Woods. not on timeline.

[] Excerpt from "Liberty, Casey County."  Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY.  December 30, 1887. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1887-12-30/ed-1/seq-1/

[December 30, 1887] -

The jurors of Casey did their work well this time by convicting five law breakers to the State penitentiary. You have published the sentence against all except Granville Crockett for the murder of Milton Woods in 1882. This case had been put off so often that the defense was evidently of the impression hat all the important witnesses had died off, but he was convicted and given two years all the same. In this case our gifted townsman, George A. Stone, assisted the prosecution and it was universally said that he made the ablest speech delivered in our courthouse for years. []






------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1882. Lincoln. John Shanks / Henry Johnson?. not on timeline.

[] Excerpt from "Two Murders."  Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY.  February 14, 1882. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1882-02-14/ed-1/seq-3/

[February 14, 1882] -


TWO MURDERS.

Robbery the Incentive of One, Revenge the Other.

Two more bloody murder are added to the already bloody record of Lincoln county. On Saturday night, John Shanks, a wealthy farmer, living near Crab Orchard, was shot in the head and neck with squirrel shot fired from a gun, while between his crib and stable, and on Sunday morning was found there cold and stiff by a servant who came to feed his stock. He gave the alarm, when neighbors came in and examined both the body and the premises. His safe keys were found in his pocket, although he was seen with some $20 notes, while in Crab Orchard, the evening before. Mr. Shanks was an eccentric genius, and although possessed of some $50,000 to $60,000 lived like a miser, alone and uncared for. He was always feared that his life would be taken as it has been and had repeatedly told of robbers and others coming to his house at night, but owing to his cranky spells, his stories were not believed. At present no clue to the bloody deed has been divulged, though knowing ones look wise and confident that all will come out in a day or two. The body of the murdered man was taken to his sister's, Mrs. Sarah J. Wells, where it was properly cared for, and from whence it was taken to Crab Orchard Cemetery for interment at 3:30 yesterday evening. From Dr. J. B. Owsley, who attended the burial, we learn that Henry Johnson, the negro who found the dead body, has been arrested for the murder, there being some suspicious circumstances against him. From all that we can learn, however, these are very slight, and we trust that no poor negro will be unjustly made the scape grace of the perpetrator of the deed, as in a former case from that end of the county. []



---

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. February 17, 1882. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1882-02-17/ed-1/seq-3/

[February 17, 1882] -


THE SHANKS MURDER. -- There have been no fresh developments in this matter, but there are rumors afloat that a flood-gate of light will be unloosed at the examining trial of the negro Henry Johnson to-day. It is not thought that he is the perpetrator of the deed, but that he knows all about it, it is almost certain. The real murderer is said to be a white man, and the same who has been suspected of the numerous other robberies in that end of the county. The County Attorney, Mr. Miller, intends to make a searching investigation, and if possible bring the right man to justice. []





------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1883. Lincoln County. not on timeline

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. November 6, 1885. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1885-11-06/ed-1/seq-3/

[November 6, 1885] -

The trial of Dolph Bailey, who killed Howard Dudley, another negro in 1883, resulted in his acquittal, the jury retiring but a few minutes. Hon T. P. Hill, Jr., distinguished himself in the defense in this case and made a speech, which showed from what block he was chipped. []



-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

[] "A Man-Devil." Cincinnati Post, Cincinnati, OH. July 10, 1883. Page 1. Genealogybank.com.

[July 10, 1883] -

A MAN-DEVIL.

William Eades, Rapist, Murderer, and Thief, is Arrested in Missouri and Brought Back to Somerset.

SPECIAL TO THE PENNY POST.

SOMERSET, KY., July 10. -- William Eades, arrested by the sheriff of Adams co., Missouri, for stealing a horse, was brought from that state and jailed here yesterday, to answer for many crimes committed in this vicinity. He is about 35, and was born in what is known as the "White Oaks." This section of Pulaski co. was always prolific of rogues, thieves, and murderers. When 17 he was the trusted farm hand of a man named Moses Muncey near Mill Springs, Wayne co. One night he crept through the bed-room window of Muncey's 16 year-old daughter, Hannah, satisfied his evil passions, and made his escape. He disappeared for a time, but came upon the surface again as one of the Cooper men--a gang of the most desperate characters that ever infested southern Kentucky. He took part in the well-remembered fight between the Cooperites and ku-klux at Somerset, in which seven ku-klux and five of Cooper's men were killed on the public square. He distinguished himself that day by going to the room of a sick man, in the old National hotel, and murdering him in cold blood, because he was suspected of being a ku-klux. Later he came out on the sidewalk, and, while the warm blood was still dripping from his dirk, put the blade, which had been bent against some of the bones of his victim's body, between his teeth and straightened it, remarking at the time: "The blood of a d--n ku-klux is sweeter than honey." Though he thought that Kentucky justice would never overtake him, he was well aware that the hate of his enemies would soon put a stop to his lawless life, and he fled the country. Gradually the history of his misdeeds passed out of mind, and he ventured back again to his old haunts in White Oak. This time he lived with his decrepid old grandmother, who was a fortune-teller, a reputed witch, and who had an underground bar-room, where she sold moonshine whisky for a lot of illicit distillers. Eades soon engaged in the traffic. He would fill a canoe with several kegs of whisky, and paddle up to Burnside on the Cincinnati Southern railroad, and, as it was a considerable place at this time, sell his liquor and get back to his hiding place before the officers got on his track. One day, while at Burnside, he attempted to kiss the pretty wife of a gentleman who lived there. She told her husband of the insult. He remonstrated with Eades, and was immediately shot dead. This was the last exploit of his in the country. A mob of men followed him through the mountains of Tennessee for three days, but he escaped. His personal description had been sent to most of the sheriffs in the adjacent states, but nothing of his whereabouts was known until the news came of his arrest. []



-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

[] "Murdered By His Uncle." Wheeling Register, Wheeling, WV. August 20, 1883. Page 1. Genealogybank.com.

[August 20, 1883] -

Murdered By His Uncle.

SOMERSET, KY., August 19. -- Eli Sprague shot his nephew, Wiley Sprague, through the heart, near Pine Knot, last night. No provocation had been given. []


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

[] Excerpt from "Pulaski County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. November 2, 1883. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1883-11-02/ed-1/seq-3/

[November 2, 1883] -

PULASKI COUNTY.--The dead body of John Williams was found at the foot of a bluff near Barren Fork, having come to his death by falling over the cliff. Williams and a negro by the name of Rufus Sallee had been out together for a day or two on a drunken spree and there are some suspicions of foul play on the part of the negro. []



---

[] Excerpt from "State Notes." The Courier-Journal, Louisville, KY. December 15, 1883. Page 3. Newspapers.com.

[December 15, 1883] -

Rufe Sallee, charged with murdering a man named Williams, whose dead body was found in Pulaski at the foot of a cliff eighty feet high, has been acquitted. []



-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1884. Laurel. James Riley / John Lloyd

[] Excerpt from "Crime and Criminals." Trenton Evening Times, Trenton, NJ. June 2, 1884. Page 4. Genealogybank.com.

[June 2, 1884] -

Two Kentucky Tragedies.

LONDON, Ky., June 2.--On Saturday night, at Pittsburg, a mining town near here, a difficulty occurred between James and Peter Riley and David Jackson on one side, and John Lloyd, Sam Taylor, and John Pressnell on the other, in which James Riley, being pressed by John Lloyd, who had a knife in his hand, drew his pistol and fired, killing him instantly. Riley and Jackson then turned upon Lloyd's two friends with clubs, beating them terribly. They are, however, not thought to be mortally wounded. Riley and Jackson escaped. The sheriff and a posse are pursuing them. At the same place, George Delph, a bank boss, struck Neal Beatty, a colored boy. Beatty drew a pistol and shot Delph in the breast, inflicting a very serious wound. []


---

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. June 3, 1884. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1884-06-03/ed-1/seq-3/

[June 3, 1884] -

Two more murders are added to Laurel county's growing list. In a general row a[t] Pittsburg, Saturday, a man named James Riley shot and instantly killed John Lloyd. Riley and his partner, Jackson, then beat two other men severely with clubs and made good their escape. At the same place later in the day Neal Beatty, a negro boy shot and probably fatally wounded George Delph, a coal bank boss, who struck him over the head. []





-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1884. Rockcastle. John Ketcham / ? Bowles

[] Excerpt from "Kentucky Knowledge." Semi-Weekly South Kentuckian, Hopkinsville, KY. May 27, 1884. Page 4. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86069394/1884-05-27/ed-1/seq-4/

[May 27, 1884] -

John Ketcham, was shot and instantly killed by a man named Bowles, in Rockcastle county. []



------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1884. Lincoln? William Adams / Ike Moore

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. January 9, 1885. Page 3. LOC.

[January 9, 1885] -

The trial of William Adams for the murder of Ike Moore, on the 6th of December, was called yesterday, but the defendant not being ready, it was continued till next Monday and he was remanded back to jail. Adams was very badly wounded by Moore, and for the long time, his life was dispared of, but has recovered sufficiently to be brought to time. []



---

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. January 13, 1885. Page 3. LOC.

[January 13, 1885] -

The examining trial of William Adams, for the murder of Ike Moore, occupied the attention of Judge Varnon yesterday. There were a great many witnesses and three young lawyers had to spurt their eloquence, so it took all day. Master Peyton assisted County Attorney Carpenter and W. E. Varnon held a lone hand for the defendant. The result was that he was held in $500 bail to the Circuit Court, which he failed to give. []





------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1885. Boyle. George Ball / Will Woods

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. January 13, 1885. Page 3. LOC.

[January 13, 1885] -

MURDER AT SHELBY CITY. -- At an early hour Sunday morning, at a negro dance-house, in a locality known as Hell's Half-acre, located in the suburbs of the town. George Ball shot and instantly killed Will Woods; both colored. Ball made his escape and at present has not been arrested. This is the second murder in this town in the last two weeks. []




------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Neal is Boyd County, not in parameters.
Sexson is Knox County

[] Excerpt from Column 1. Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. March 27, 1885. Page 2. LOC.

[March 27, 1885] -

Acting Gov. Hindman has finally agreed that Neal shall hang and unless he changes his mind again at the 11th hour, that much convicted and costly criminal will yield up his forfeited life at the hands of the law to-day at 1 o'clock. John Sexson, too, at Barbourville, will perform the dull thud act for the murder of George Rowdon, always providing in such cases that the a.g. does not change his mind. []




------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Lincoln County. August 1884. not on timeline.

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. November 6, 1885. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1885-11-06/ed-1/seq-3/

[November 6, 1885] -

The trial of John Waddle for the killing of Sam Murphy, at Kings Mountain in August, 1884, was begun Wednesday. The proof was that Murphy had called Waddle a s-n of a b---h and was standing with his knife drawn when the defendant threw a beer bottle against his head, crushing his skull, from which he died. He was only indicted for manslaughter. Col. Thos. Z. Morrow, of Somerset, and Welch & Saufley represented him and the case was argued by Morrow, Saufley and Warren yesterday and submitted. The jury was not long in finding a verdict of involuntary manslaughter and fixing a fine of $50. []





-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1885.

[] Excerpt from "Notes of Current Events." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. January 27, 1885. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1885-01-27/ed-1/seq-2/

[January 27, 1885] -

A man named Smith was lynched for attempt at rape in Pulaski last week. []


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. November 6, 1885. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1885-11-06/ed-1/seq-3/

[November 6, 1885] -

CIRCUIT COURT. -- According to the proof admitted in the trial, there has never been a case before the court here, with but one exception, in which there appeared so little of extenuation as in that of Henry Roberts for the killing of Nick Benedict, which was on trial when we went to press Monday night. The crime amounted almost to assassination and yet the jury after reporting that they could not agree, finally agreed after being held all night Tuesday, to give him but 13 years in the penitentiary, just three more than he agreed to take and not go to trial. We learn from the jury that when they first went to their room they stood six for 21 years and six for a less time, none, however, below five years. The youth of the defendant and the statement which partially came out in proof that Benedict had assaulted Roberts' sister, is all that saved his neck or kept him from a life term. Judge Saufley in arguing the case did not plead for acquittal, but ingeniously worked int he unproven charges to his clients great benefit. Messrs. Robert Harding and R. C. Warren both made strong speeches for the prosecution. []



---

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. November 10, 1885. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1885-11-10/ed-1/seq-3/

[November 10, 1885] -

Henry Roberts was brought out for sentence Friday and the Judge after recalling the atrocity of his crime, which, but for his youth, the jury would have punished with death or life imprisonment, admonished him that he yet had enough of life to make amends and hoped that he would come from the State prison resolved to do so. He then passed the sentence of 13 years on him for the murder of Nick Benedict. Roberts is but 17 years of age. []




------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. November 6, 1885. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1885-11-06/ed-1/seq-3/

[November 6, 1885] -


George T. Ball was indicted for the murder of his father and a bench warrant has been issued for him. []


---

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. November 13, 1885. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1885-11-13/ed-1/seq-3/

[November 13, 1885] -

The case of George T. Ball for the murder of his father, W. M. Ball, was called Wednesday and a jury obtained without much difficulty as follows: James Robinson, A. B. McKinney, J. J. McKinney, A. D. Root, G. G. Fair, Richard Burnett, L. B. Nunnelley, B. F. Powell, H. E. Marcum, K. L. Tanner, T. J. Bosley, Monroe Smith. The prosecution proved besides the facts of the killing, which were substantially given in this paper at the time of the tragedy, that the defendant had made repeated threats that he would kill the old man. The court then permitted Mrs. Ball, widow of the deceased and mother of the accused to tell why George had made such threats. Her account of the killing was that Mr. Ball came to where she and George were and cursed her about the supper. George remonstrated with him for talking so to her and with an oath he started off saying, "I'd fix you." Returning in a moment with a pistol George ran into the room and as the old man started to fire at him he shot first and hen the witness went out and around the house. The story of her treatment by the man who had promised to love, cherish and protect her, was simply horrible. She said that he began shortly after her marriage to ill use her, but the court only permitted her to testify of matters of which George was personally cognizant. On one occasion he ordered her to go to the still house and bring him a bottle of whisky, also a glass with some sugar in it. She did as directed, but because she brought no water he dashed the glass in her face and threw the bottle at her. At another time because some article of food displeased him he cursed her and threw dish and all against her head. Often he would beat her with a stick and otherwise maltreat her. He positively refused to permit her to attend church and on several occasions had used his stick on George. It was a horrible recital of man's inhumanity and such as stirred to pity the heart of every person present. Mrs. Ball's testimony was fully corroborated by several others and by mutual agreement the case was given to the jury at the close of the testimony without argument. After a short retirement a verdict of acquittal was agreed and at 12 o'clock it was so reported and the prisoner discharged. []


---

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. July 5, 1887. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1887-07-05/ed-1/seq-3/

[July 5, 1887] -

DEATH. -- George Ball, after an illness of four weeks, of a brain and spinal affection, died Saturday afternoon, aged about 26. It will be remembered that he interferred in a row between his father, Billy Ball, and his mother, and that he shot the old man dead when he endeavored to assault him for it. He has been drinking a good deal since the act and that no doubt hastened his death. []



------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. November 6, 1885. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1885-11-06/ed-1/seq-3/

[November 6, 1885] -


The trial of Robert Chappell for the murder of Joe Jones is set for next Tuesday... []



------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

William Carson / [?][?], Lincoln County, 1885? not on timeline

[] Excerpt from "." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. November 6, 1885. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1885-11-06/ed-1/seq-3/

[November 6, 1885] -

Judge Owsley has not decided upon the application of Carson for a new trial but it is not likely he will grant it. Two juries have pronounced him guilty and none of the last jury, which gave him five years, was for less than two and from that to ten years. Should the judge refuse a new trial, one of the attorneys tells us that he will take the case to the Court of Appeals, while another thinks they have done all for their client that they should do. []


---

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. November 10, 1885. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1885-11-10/ed-1/seq-3/

[November 10, 1885] -

William Carson was also sentenced after he had made a little speech in answer to the Judge's question if he had anything to say why the verdict should not be executed. He acknowledged that he had been given two fair trials, but said his act was in self defense and that therefore he ought not to be punished. The sentence was passed but suspended for 60 days to await the result of an appeal. []




------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

[] Excerpt from "Notes of Current Events." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. December 22, 1885. Page 4. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1885-12-22/ed-1/seq-4/

[December 22, 1885] -


At Beaver creek mines, near Somerset, William Parsons killed Frank Wilson. Charles Gooden and W. A. Owens fatally stabbed two other men, names not known. Parsons escaped, but the other two were arrested. []




------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

[] Excerpt from Column 2. Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. March 12, 1886. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1886-03-12/ed-1/seq-2/

[March 12, 1886] -


All is quiet at the Greenwood mines. But one company of men and a Gatling gun remain and they are sufficient to protect the convicts and maintain the dignity of the State, which can not afford to permit mobs to force her into terms. []



------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Pulaski or Lincoln?

[] Excerpt from "Notes of Current Events." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. April 16, 1886. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1886-04-16/ed-1/seq-2/

[April 16, 1886] -

A Somerset dispatch says: Six men accused of complicity in the murder of Ben Wilson on Indian Creek, on April 1, were brought here by six citizens of that neighborhood, who had armed themselves and captured the men near the scene of the murder. []





------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

[] Excerpt from "Somerset Notes." The Courier Journal, Louisville, KY. May 2, 1886. Page 5. Newspapers.com.

[May 2, 1886] -

SOMERSET, May 1. -- The young man, Geo. McCarty, suspected of the murder of his uncle, Presley McCarty, who was found dead in his yard last Thursday, has left the country. They were both drinking characters and lived in the same house by themselves. The elder man, when found, was shot in the back, the charge passing through the body and making a large hole. The shotgun was found on his bed. George McCarty, the young man suspected, is about twenty years old and has served a term in the penitentiary. []



---

[] Excerpt from "Somerset Reporter." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 4, 1886. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1886-05-04/ed-1/seq-2/

[May 4, 1886] -


A young man named George McCarty, was found dead near his home this morning. A shot-gun was found on his bed. []





------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1887. Eb Cooley / Henderson Green. not on timeline.

[] Excerpt from "Garrard County Department." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. September 6, 1887. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1886-10-08/ed-1/seq-2/

[September 6, 1887] -

Henderson Green, who was shot by Ed Cooley, was still alive on Sunday. It is thought if he lives he will never see again, as both of his eyes are out.

The grand jury indicted Eb Cooley for murder.

On Thursday in the upper part of the county Eb Cooley shot and killed Peter Green and it is thought mortally wounded his brother, Henderson. Cooley's statement of the affair is that the Greens, between whom and himself an old grudge existed, came to his house and raised the trouble by firing into it, while Henderson Green claims that he and his brother were quietly pursuing their way home and that on passing Cooley's house he fired upon them without provocation. Cooley is in jail, having surrendered himself to the jailer immediately after the killing. []



---

[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon, Rockcastle County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. October 25, 1887. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1887-10-25/ed-1/seq-2/

[October 25, 1887] -

That looked for mob at Lancaster which was expected to come from Rockcastle to mob Cooley, of course did not materialize. If they are visited by one it will not come from this county. []



---

[] Excerpt from "Garrard County Department." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. January 27, 1888. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1888-01-27/ed-1/seq-2/

[January 27, 1888] -

The case against Eb Cooley for killing young Green was called on Wednesday and seven jurors obtained. The lawyers for the prosecution are Denny, Brown, Saufley and the Commonwealth's Attorney William Herndon. The defense is represented by Bradley, Kauffman, Tomlinson and R. C. Warren. []




---

[] Excerpt from "Garrard County Department." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. January 31, 1888. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1888-01-31/ed-1/seq-2/

[January 31, 1888] -

The case of the Commonwealth against Eb Cooley for killing Peter Green was called in court Wednesday and the trial was begun. After some trouble a jury was obtained, and up to Saturday night the evidence was not all in. It is thought the case will be given to the jury to-day, Tuesday. It will perhaps be a hung jury. []




---

[] Excerpts from "Garrard County Department." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. February 3, 1888. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1888-02-03/ed-1/seq-1/

[February 3, 1888] -

In the case of the Commonwealth against Eb Cooley for the wounding of Henderson Green, a bond of $500 was granted and given by the prisoner, with John Parks and B. F. Robinson as sureties.

The lawyers who made speeches in the Cooley case all acquitted themselves handsomely. Lancaster and Stanford together can turn out the finest legal talent in Kentucky. The trial created great interest, the court room being crowded day and night. []



---

[] Excerpt from "Local Affairs." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. February 3, 1888. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1888-02-03/ed-1/seq-3/

[February 3, 1888] -

Those who heard the trial of Eb Cooley at Lancaster this week, for the murder of Peter Green, say that it was but little short of an assassination, yet that excellent jury very promptly acquitted him and Mr. Cooley is again at large. The legislature ought either to change the criminal laws which make such a result possible, or enact one giving each rascal who takes the life of a fellow mortal a chromo.



---

[] Excerpts from "Garrard County Department." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. February 10, 1888. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1888-02-10/ed-1/seq-3/

[February 10, 1888] -

Eb Cooley, who was recently acquitted of the murder of Peter Green, in Garrard county, and who is still under indictment for shooting Henderson Green, who lost both eyes by the wounds, has gone West to grow up with the country. He left Tuesday with Illinois as the objective point. It is hoped that in his new home he will not be "forced" to murder any more men. []



---

[] Excerpts from "Lancaster, Garrard County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. August 17, 1888. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1888-08-17/ed-1/seq-2/

[August 17, 1888] -

Eb Cooley, who has been living in Kansas, has returned to stand trial in circuit court of an indictment for malicious shooting. []




---

[] "Bad Man From Bitter Creek." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. September 3, 1889. Page 4. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1889-09-03/ed-1/seq-4/

[September 3, 1889] -


Bad Man From Bitter Creek.

The notorious Eb Cooley, of Garrard county, who has killed two men and shot the eyes out of a third, honored Richmond with a visit on Tuesday. Soon after his arrival he began to fill up on whiskey, and, with two pistols buckled around him, proceeded to take the town. Forgetting that he was not in Lancaster, he visited several business houses, insulted several citizens and threatened to shoot an inoffensive Irishman. The police, however, attended to his case and ran him in. He was arrested on three warrants, two for concealed weapons and one for drunkenness and disorderly conduct. On Wednesday he was taken before Judge Rice and one of the concealed weapons cases was tried with a conviction, giving him ten days in jail and fining him $50. The other two cases were continued until Cooley serves out his first sentence, when most probably the dose will be repeated. Bad men from Garrard should read this story and hereafter avoid Richmond in their travels. It is not a good town for their business and hasn't been since the memorable Saunders affair of ten years ago. -- Richmond Register. []




------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1886. Casey. Joseph Cooley / David Hundley. not on timeline.

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. November 2, 1886. Page 3. LOC.  http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1886-11-02/ed-1/seq-3/

[November 2, 1886] -

Last Saturday, near Rawling's Mills, in Casey County, Joseph Cooley was killed by David Hundley, the weapon used being an ax. Hundley says Cooley came to where he was cutting wood, and beginning a quarrel with him, endeavored to cut his throat, whereupon he struck him with his ax, inflicting a fatal wound, six inches in length, near the left nipple. The ax cut through the ribs and divided the heart in two. Hundley and wife are now under arrest at Liberty awaiting trial. []




------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1886. Elias Searcy / Hugh Edwards, Jeff Jarrett, Bud Croutcher.

[] “Is It Murder?” The Courier Journal, Louisville, KY. October 14, 1886. Page 5. Newspapers.com.

[October 14, 1886] -


IS IT A MURDER?


Mysterious Death of Elias Searcy, of Paint Lick -- Three Men Charged With His Murder.

(Special to the Courier Journal.)

Mt. Vernon, Ky., Oct. 13. -- Hugh Edwards, Jeff. Jarrett, and Bud Croutcher were arrested yesterday by Coroner John Riddle and brought to town to-day. These parties stand charged with murder. The circumstances, so far as could be learned, are from Mr. Riddle about as follows: A man from Paint Lick named Elias Searcy, a blacksmith by trade, started out to the Roundstone country with $30 to buy a milch cow. He was accompanied by Bud Croutcher, who also lives near Paint Lick. They came to Jarrett's at Gap, a small station on the K. C. railroad, when they began to drink and have a little spree. Hugh Edwards was at Jeff. Jarrett's saloon, and it is presumed that Croutcher informed them about Searcy's money, and that a drug of some kind was put in Searcy's whisky, from the effects of which he soon went to sleep. When the time came to close up for the night Searcy was dragged out of the door and left on the platform, where he was found by Chant. Lair, who happened to be passing that way. Lair tried to awaken the man, whom he supposed to be sleeping, and found that he was dead. The alarm was given and a crowd soon gathered and the body was prepared for burial, which took place at Richmond, Ky. The three parties above named were arrested and brought to this place for trial, which will not take place until a post mortem is held to ascertain whether or not poison had been administered. The post mortem will be held at Richmond as soon as the proper arrangements can be made. Searcy was a man who drank to excess some times, but otherwise was a good citizen. Hugh Edwards is a native of this county, and has always had a very good reputation. Jarrett and Crutcher lived in Madison and Garrard counties. Only fifty cents was found on Searcy's person when his body was being dressed. []



---

[] Excerpt from "Paint Lick, Garrard County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. October 15, 1886. Page 1. LOC.

[October 15, 1886] -

Last Sunday E. L. Searcy, W. A. Crutcher, Tom Callahan and others went out on Roundstone chestnut hunting. In the evening they started home and went by a house where whisky is sold to get a drink. Mr. Searcy took a little too much and stopped on the road and laid down. The other parties went to a house near by to get something to eat and were gone but a short time. When they came back they tried to arouse him up to start, but he was dead. It is said when he left home that morning he had $35 in his pocket, but he had only 50c when he was examined after death. An inquest was held and the jury returned a verdict that whisky was the cause of his death. It is a little mysterious and the matter ought to be thoroughly investigated. []



------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1886. Wayne. Gran Prewitt / Jarvis Buck. not on timeline

[] Excerpt from "Notes Of Current Events." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1886-11-02/ed-1/seq-2/

[November 2, 1886] -

Gran Prewitt murdered Jarvis Buck and a sister, in Wayne county, to rob them of $60. He was captured, along with his accomplices, Jim Jones and Bill Simpson, and subsequently confessed. Strong talk of lynching is being indulged in by the excited people of the section. []



---

[] "Full Particulars of the Murder of Jarvis Buck and Sister in Wayne." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal  Stanford, KY. November 5, 1886. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1886-11-05/ed-1/seq-1/

[November 5, 1886] -



------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

[] Excerpt from "News and Comment." The Courier-Journal, Louisville, KY. September 10, 1886. Page 1. Newspapers.com.

[September 10, 1886] -

A short time since, George Inman was shot and killed, near Livingston, by a man named St. Clair. Tuesday, while John and Andrew Inman were cleaning their pistols, preparatory to going in search of St. Clair, John was accidentally and fatally shot by his brother. []




---

[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon, Rockcastle County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. September 21, 1886. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1886-09-21/ed-1/seq-2/

[September 21, 1886] -

John St. Clair, of Jackson county, who is charged with killing a blind man named Innman near Livingston, in this county, about two weeks ago, came to the county one day last week and surrendered himself to Squire Gran Clark. He was brought to town and allowed to execute bond for his appearance next Friday, when his examining trial will take place. We are not acquainted with the facts in this case, but it does not seem that there could be any lawful excuse for killing an inoffensive blind man. []





------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

[] "Arrest of a Murderer." Cincinnati Commercial Tribune, Cincinnati, OH. October 10, 1886. Page 8. Genealogybank.com.

[October 10, 1886] -


ARREST OF A MURDERER

Charles Jackson, Wanted in Somerset, Ky., Apprehended in This City.

Charles Jackson (colored), who is wanted in Somerset, Ky., for murder, was arrested last evening by Detectives Crawford, Trussand Carey, and looked up in Central Station, charged with being a fugitive from justice.

The prisoner is accused of shooting William Buzzard, who was working as section hand on the Southern road. The killing occurred last spring, and was the outcome of a quarrel over a game of craps. The prisoner refused to talk. This is said to be the third murder committed by the prisoner. He will be returned to Kentucky tomorrow. []



---

[] Excerpt from "City News." Cincinnati Post, Cincinnati, OH. Monday, October 11, 1886. Page 3. Genealogybank.com.

[October 11, 1886] -


C. S. Jackson, wanted at Somerset, Ky., for the murder of Wm. Buzzard in a game of craps a year ago, was arrested in this city Saturday night, and is being held for the Kentucky authorities. []



---

[] Except from "Notes of Current Events." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. October 12, 1886. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1886-10-12/ed-1/seq-2/

[October 12, 1886] -

Charles Jackson, wanted at Somerset for the murder of William Buzzard, has been captured in Cincinnati. []



------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1886. Pulaski. Rose / Ben Wilson. not on timeline.

[] Excerpt from "Notes of Current Events." Semi-Weekly Interior JournalStanford, KY. April 9, 1886. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1886-04-09/ed-1/seq-2/

[April 9, 1886] -


At a log rolling and brush grubbing in Pulaski at the home of a man named Rose, a drunken row ensued, during which Ben Wilson was shot through the heart. []




------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1886? Pulaski. Macklin or McLain / Doss. not on timeline.

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." Semi-Weekly Interior JournalStanford, KY. April 27, 1886. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1886-04-27/ed-1/seq-3/

[April 27, 1886] -

PULASKI COURT. -- Commonwealth's Attorney R. C. Warren tells us that he tried two murder cases at Somerset last week. William Macklin for killing James Doss was acquitted and Albert Sharp for the murder of Lewis Thomas, another negro, was sent up for life. []



------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1886? Pulaski. Sharp / Thomas. not on timeline.

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." Semi-Weekly Interior JournalStanford, KY. April 27, 1886. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1886-04-27/ed-1/seq-3/

[April 27, 1886] -

PULASKI COURT. -- Commonwealth's Attorney R. C. Warren tells us that he tried two murder cases at Somerset last week. William Macklin for killing James Doss was acquitted and Albert Sharp for the murder of Lewis Thomas, another negro, was sent up for life. []





------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

not on timeline. Lincoln County. Martin Smith / Oc. Smith, Nov 1886

[] Excerpt from "Our Sister Cities -- Stanford." Kentucky Advocate, Danville, KY. November 19, 1886. Page 3. Newspapers.com. 

[November 19, 1886] -

Martin Smith, for the murder of Oc. Smith a few days since, was allowed bail in the sum of $3,000. My first report of this killing, written a few minutes after its occurrence, was incorrect in several particulars, and justice to the deceased required a correction. Oc. Smith was going from town in a buggy with Joe Hocker, his horse being hitched to the horse in the buggy. While out fixing the bridle Mart. Smith passed them going to town. Oc. told him to stop, that he wanted to talk to him, but he rode on and Oc. called to him once or twice and followed him some distance.Oc. then got on his horse and returned to town, and Mart, seeing him as he came in, procured a shot gun and went immediately where he was, and told him to defend himself, and then shot him. Oc. then drew a pistol, and Mart. shot him the second time. As before stated there had been bad blood between them for some time. []




---

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. March 25, 1887. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1886-03-25/ed-1/seq-3/

[March 25, 1887] -

The case of Martin Smith, for the murder of Oc Smith last fall, was then called and after a fruitless effort by the defense to continue, the selection of a jury began. The regular panels were exhausted and but one juror obtained, Mr. A. C. Robinson. Some 50 or more bystanders were examined, but not another being secured, the judge ordered the sheriff to go to Garrard and summon 50 man to report yesterday morning. It will be remembered that Mart shot his victim Nov. court day on Main street in Stanford when it was full of people and subsequent trial for bail and the newspaper reports gave the case great notoriety, which accounts for the failure to obtain a jury at home.

The gentlemen summoned were on time and by 9:45 yesterday the panel was complete after perhaps 25 were examined. The remaining 11 jurors are Howard Hardin, James Ward, James Walker, Doc Walker, W. M. Kirby, R. H. Batson, Jacob Joseph, J. S. Greenleaf and J. B. Johnston. The State is represented by her attorney, Wm. Herndon and Messrs. R. C. Warren and Robert Harding and the defense by Messrs. W. O. Bradley, W. H. Miller and J. B. Paxton.

Judge Morrow kindly offered us the facility for taking down the testimony in the Smith case, but we had given it before when he made application for bail and thought it useless.

There are twenty odd witnesses on each side in the Smith case, making over 50 in all, and it is thought that with the speeches the case will occupy at least all of to-day. 

The Commonwealth got through with its testimony in chief at 4 yesterday, but it has good many witnesses in reserve to be called up hereafter. A session of the court was held last night. []



------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

[] Excerpt from "Notes of Current Events." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. November 30, 1886. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1886-11-30/ed-1/seq-2/

[November 30, 1886] -


Pinkney White, a negro was arrested in Cincinnati for the murder of George Brown, his room-mate, at Somerset, Ky., in March, 1885. []





------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

[] "Burned to Death." The Evening Bulletin, Maysville, KY. October 29, 1886. Page 4. Newspapers.com.

[October 26, 1886] -

BURNED TO DEATH.

An Awful Holocaust at Flat Lick, Knox County, Kentucky.

WILLIAMSBURG, KY., Oct. 20. -- News reached here this morning of the burning last Tuesday night of a family residence near Flat Rock, Knox county, wherein eight persons perished. The house was in an open field a mile from any other residence, and the fire was not discovered until yesterday morning after the house had burned up, with its inmates. Those who lost their lives were Mrs. Pope and five children, the eldest nine years and the youngest fifteen months, and Mary Carnes and Lizzie Adams, aged sixteen and twelve years, respectively.

The house, a log one, was built about five years ago, and was one and one-half stories high with entrance at one door. It was composed of two rooms, one of which as used by the family as a kitchen, where it is supposed the fire originated. The family had all retired to the other room, and shutting the door, gone to sleep only to be awakened, probably by falling timbers, when it was too late to escape. From the position of the remains after the fire had died out, it seems that one had reached the door and fallen back. 

Near where the window had been the body of the mother was found, by her side her four children, while the baby lay across her breast. Remnants of the bed clothing encircled all, indicating that the mother had fought the flames bravely in the vain effort to save the life of herself and children. Nothing was found of any of the bodies except a few bones and ashes. These were carefully placed in a box and brought to this place [Williamsburg], and buried to-day, a vast crowd being present. All were buried in one grave. William Pope, the terribly afflicted father, who is so suddenly left alone in the world, is almost crazed with grief. He is probably the best known man on the river connected with the log business. He is about sixty-five years old.

Business has not prospered with him for some years past and he was compelled to retire from a more comfortable home and seek shelter for his family where best it could be found, until drawn to this lonely spot, where scarcely ever any one passed. Here the family was left while the father went out in search of a support for them. At the time of their sad death he was at his log camp on Stony Fork of Straight Creek, about five miles distant. The scene after the fire was heartrending. Mr. Pope having been informed and arriving early, went about wringing his hands and utter the most piteous cries, while those standing around freely wept with the afflicted man in his terrible misfortune. []





---

Col 3. The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. November 2, 1886.

---

Col 3. The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. November 30, 1886.

---

"Murdered and Burned." The Courier Journal, Louisville, KY. November 27, 1886.

[November 27, 1886] -

---

[] "Atrocious." The Hickman Courier, Hickman, KY. December 3, 1886. Page 1.

[December 3, 1886] -

ATROCIOUS

Murder of an Entire Family, and the House Burned With the Bodies In It.

LOUISVILLE, KY., Nov. 26. -- It is learned here to-day that the family of eight persons, supposed to have been accidentally burned to death in Knox County, a month since, were murdered; their throats having been first cut from ear to ear. The family, whose name was Poe, had two neighbors whos reputation was not of the best, and on this account they forbade them entering their house. These neighbors, a man and woman, though not man and wife, had an illegitimate child, a boy, about ten years old. They lived some thirty yards from Poe's house, and becoming enraged because of being refused social recognition, planned the damnable plot of murdering the entire family. The boy, suffering under a severe chastisement from his reputed father, now tells the whole story. He says his mother was talking about the matter for several days, and that is culminated during a night when Mr. Poe was absent from the home, and that when his father and mother left home for Poe's house they forbade his going with them, but that he slipped along without their knowledge, and saw them enter the house. The family, all of whom were females, were all asleep in one room, and his father with a razor cut the throats of each from ear to ear, while his mother picked the bodies up, placed them in the middle of the floor, piled the contents of two beds on them, and then set fire to them and the house, and that the poor helpless little baby screamed until the flames smothered it. The man and woman have not as yet been arrested, but a sewing machine, beds, and several other articles, recognized as belonging to the murdered family, were found beneath the house of the accused parties. There is no doubt of their guilt, and excitement has reached an intensity bordering on frenzy, so that it is more than probable the State will be saved the expense of a trial. Further particulars to-night shed additional light on the Knox County horror, and make it one of the darkest and most damnable crimes ever committed in the State, not excepting the Ashland affair some years since. []





------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

[] Excerpt from "Notes of Current Events." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. April 16, 1886. LOC.

[April 16, 1886] -

A Somerset dispatch says: Six men accused of complicity in the murder of Ben Wilson on Indian Creek, on April 1, were brought here today by six citizens of that neighborhood, who had armed themselves and captured the men near the scene of the murder.

Reports from Knox county are to the effect that Dick Baker and his son James, of Knox county, were killed at Flat Lick Wednesday, and Daniel Baker mortally wounded by Elliott Baker and a man named Ferguson. An old law suit was the cause of the affair. []




------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1886? Casey. not on timeline.

[] Excerpt from "Middleburg, Casey County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. January 31, 1896. Page 1. LOC.

[January 31, 1896] -


A report comes from New Albany, Ind., that John Meade was killed while at a game of cards, by a man with whom he was gambling. It will be remembered that he killed Green Gaddis some 10 years ago on the railroad near Grove, but was acquitted at the examining trial. []




------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon, Rockcastle County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. February 25, 1887. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1887-02-25/ed-1/seq-3/

[February 25, 1887] -

Near Pine Hill, Sunday night, Brownlow Townsend was fatally cut by Charles Childers. The circumstances are about as follows: Townsend and Childers had been paying attention to the same young lady a short distance from Pine Hill. Sunday evening they both went to see her but neither remained long. Toward night they returned under the influence of whisky and staid at the young lady's house until about an hour after dark, when they left in the company of another young man. After going a short distance towards the station a difficulty came up between Townsend and Childers, over their sweetheart, in which rocks and sticks were freely used. Knives were drawn and they began slashing at each other, when Townsend received a thrust in the thigh from which he died within fifteen minutes.  After the cutting Childers fled to the fields and laid in the fodder stack all night. He came to town Monday morning, surrendered himself and was sent to jail. His examining trial was set for Wednesday. Childers' age is about nineteen and that of his victim eighteen. Childers says he don't know who struck the first blow, both being drunk. []




------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

[] Excerpt from "Notes of Current Events." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. March 15, 1887. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1887-03-15/ed-1/seq-2/

[March 15, 1887] -

Charles Phelps and Jack Howell are the last two Pulaskians to fight to the death over an old grudge. When they met Phelps placed his knife against Howell's breast and remarked: "I've a notion to cut your heart out." How placed his knife against Phelp's throat and coolly replied, "Cut away." Phelps did cut away, but unfortunately for him his knife blade broke off at the second thrust. Howell cut Phelps' throat almost from ear to ear. []




------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

[] Excerpt from "News and Comment." The Courier-Journal, Louisville, KY. March 29, 1887. Page 1. Newspapers.com.

[March 29, 1887] -

At Mt. Vernon, Ky., yesterday, Willie Levisay and Willette Vowels, boys aged respectively fourteen and ten years, quarreled in a grocery store and going outside to fight it out, Vowels stabbed Levisay near the heart, killing him almost instantly. []




---

[] "The Mt. Vernon Boy Murder." The Courier-Journal, Louisville, KY. March 30, 1887. Page 1. Newspapers.com.

[March 30, 1887] -


The Mt. Vernon Boy Murder.

MT. VERNON, KY., March 29. -- [Special.] -- The stabbing of young Livesay by Will Vowels last night is all the topic here to-day. The funeral will take place this afternoon at 3 o'clock. There is no hard feelings between the families of the parties. All recognize the fact that it was a very unfortunate affair, and that it is equally hard upon the families of both parties. Vowels was arrested last night shortly after the killing by Marshal Tom Proctor and turned over to the County Judge, who placed him in the custody of the Jailer. The examining trial is set for tomorrow, the 30th. On account of the youth of Vowels it is presumed that he will not be vigorously prosecuted. Vowels is eleven years old and Livesay was fourteen. []




------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 24, 1887. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1887-05-24/ed-1/seq-3/

[May 24, 1887] -

Two of the seven murder cases to be tried in London this court have been disposed of, John Hurley getting five years and Charles Luker a like sentence. []



---

[] Excerpt from "London, Laurel County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 31, 1887. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1887-05-31/ed-1/seq-1/

[May 31, 1887] -


Charles Luker was tried the following week for murder, the victim being Isaac Nelson, and given seven years for "recklessly, wantonly and carelessly firing his pistol at a charivari." []




---

[] Excerpt from "London, Laurel County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. June 7, 1887. Page 6. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1887-06-07/ed-1/seq-6/

[June 7, 1887] -


Bills of exceptions in both the Luker (seven years) and Dizney (life sentence) cases have been filed and will go to the Court of Appeals. []




------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 24, 1887. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1887-05-24/ed-1/seq-3/

[May 24, 1887] -

Two of the seven murder cases to be tried in London this court have been disposed of, John Hurley getting five years and Charles Luker a like sentence. []



---

[] Excerpt from "London, Laurel County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 31, 1887. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1887-05-31/ed-1/seq-1/

[May 31, 1887] -


The first week, John Hurley, for the murder of Isaac Hyde, was tried and found guilty of manslaughter and assessed five years in the pen. []




------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 24, 1887. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1887-05-24/ed-1/seq-3/

[May 24, 1887] -

The Wayne circuit court only sent one man to the penitentiary, Eliheu McDonald, for killing Bell, two years. William Sloan, for killing Shelby Gregory, was acquitted. The latter was defended by Messrs. R. C. Warren and M. C. Saufley. []




------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Excerpt from "News Condensed." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. April 6, 1888. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1888-04-06/ed-1/seq-2/

[April 6, 1888] -


Mrs. Mary and Eliza Jasper fired on a negro trying to break into their house, on Fishing Creek, in Pulaski, and brought down Henry Dick, a notorious negro of that section. []




------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

[] Excerpt from "Danville, Boyle County." Semi-weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. April 13, 1888. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1888-04-13/ed-1/seq-2/

[April 13, 1888] -

The portion of human remains found on McClenden's ridge, in Pulaski county, turns out to be what is left of two peddlers, whom the Hill brothers and their housekeeper murdered and cut up for hog food. The woman has made a confession and says that the men got $200. []



---

[] Excerpt from "." Semi-weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. April 24, 1888. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1888-04-24/ed-1/seq-2/

[April 24, 1888] -

The story about pieces of the dead bodies of two men being found in Pulaski and the subsequent confession of Mrs. Smith, who said she helped John and Henry Hill kill the two Burton boys for their money, turns out to be false all around, by the appearance of the two boys at the examining trial and unmistakable proof that the pieces of flesh came from a dead sheep. []




-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

not on timeline. not a killing, need to move to non-fatal 1880s list

[] Excerpt from "Local Lore." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. April 24, 1888. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1888-04-24/ed-1/seq-3/

[April 24, 1888] -

SHOOTING. -- About 8 o'clock Sunday night three pistol shots were heard and upon investigation it was found that John Cook had shot Andy Yates, another negro, in the arm, breaking it, and in the left breast, the latter a glancing shot, which did no damage, further than to pass through the clothing. Marshal Carpenter arrested both, but Cook gave bail and did not go with his enemy to jail. Cook keeps store on Depot street and Andy came in and raised a row. He was ordered out, but soon returned, when Cook told him not to enter. He tried to do so and Cook let go at him with the above result. Andy only got in one shot before his arm was broken. Cook is a well-behaved man and stands high with his race. Yates has been in many a row and a stay in jail is by no means a new experience with him. Examining trial to-day. []


---

[] Excerpt from "Our Neighbors." Kentucky Advocate, Danville, KY. May 4, 1888. Page 3. Newspapers.com.

[May 4, 1888] -

LINCOLN -- An attempt to break jail was discovered by Jailer Owens this week, before the work had proceeded far, and frustrated ... John Cook was acquitted on the grounds of self defense for shooting Andy Yates, who was also acquitted because he did nothing further than to go into Cook's house after he had ordered him not to ... The negro, Cas Inman, who killed Cy Singleton at Kingsville, a year or two ago, has been arrested in Alabama and Deputy Sheriff J. M. Johnson has gone after him. []



-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1886. Lincoln. Singleton. not on timeline.

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. November 5, 1886. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1886-11-05/ed-1/seq-3/

[November 5, 1886] -

The trials of John Brice, &c, for the murder of Si Singleton at Kings Mountain is set for the 13th day of the term; []



---

[] Excerpt from "Our Neighbors." Kentucky Advocate, Danville, KY. May 4, 1888. Page 3. Newspapers.com.

[May 4, 1888] -

LINCOLN -- An attempt to break jail was discovered by Jailer Owens this week, before the work had proceeded far, and frustrated ... John Cook was acquitted on the grounds of self defense for shooting Andy Yates, who was also acquitted because he did nothing further than to go into Cook's house after he had ordered him not to ... The negro, Cas Inman, who killed Cy Singleton at Kingsville, a year or two ago, has been arrested in Alabama and Deputy Sheriff J. M. Johnson has gone after him. []





-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

not on timeline

[] Excerpt from "Local Lore." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. June 26, 1888. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1888-06-26/ed-1/seq-3/

[June 26, 1888] -

KILLING. -- A man named Shumate, from Bardstown, shot and killed another named McCarty, at Sinks, in Rockcastle county, Friday. We depended on our Mt. Vernon man to give particulars, but his letter failed to come. []




-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

[] "Murdered In the Road." The Courier Journal, Louisville, KY. September 16, 1888. Page 7. Newspapers.com.

[September 16, 1888] -

Murdered In the Road.

Mt. Vernon, Ky., Sept. 15. -- (Special.) -- This afternoon, between Brodhead and his home, Allen Haggard was found in the road murdered. Indications point to the murdered man's son-in-law, J. E. Powell, as the assassin, as they had been at outs for some time, over the fact of Powell's wife having made application for divorce, charging her husband with inhuman treatment. The parties had been carrying guns for each other for some time. No arrests. []



---

[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon, Rockcastle County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. September 18, 1888. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1888-09-18/ed-1/seq-1/

[September 18, 1888] -


Saturday afternoon, between Brodhead and his home, Allen Hagard was found in the road murdered. Indications point to the murdered man's son-in-law, J. E. Powell, as the assassin, as they had been at outs for sometime over the fact of Powell's wife having made application for divorce, charging her husband with inhuman treatment. The parties had been carrying guns for each other for sometime. No arrest. []





---

[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon, Rockcastle County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. December 7, 1888. Page 1. LOC.

[December 7, 1888] -

The Widow Haggard is making an effort to have the governor offer a reward for the arrest of Powell, the murderer of her husband. []



-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

[] Excerpt from "." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. December 7, 1888. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1888-12-07/ed-1/seq-3/


---

[] Excerpt from Column 2. Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. December 11, 1888. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1888-12-11/ed-1/seq-3/


Tom Harper, West Hansford, Lincoln


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

One Killed, One Injured In Gunfight On Train, Laurel, 1889

[] "Should Have Given Stringer One." Elkhart Daily Review, Elkhart, IN. January 25, 1889. Page 1. Genealogybank.com.

[January 25, 1889] -


SHOULD HAVE GIVEN STRINGER ONE.

A Brakeman Does Good Shooting, but Not Quite Good Enough.

STANFORD, Ky., Jan. 25. -- Wednesday evening, as Conductor O'Mally's south-bound freight train was passing Pittsburg [Ky.], just above here, James Raines, a brakeman, was fired upon by two desperadoes, Tom Stringer and Sam Graggs. Raines returned the fire, both balls taking effect upon Graggs, one through the heart and the other in the temple, killing him instantly. Raines then started toward the caboose, when Stringer fired at him, striking Raines in the hip. Raines was brought to this place and is in a serious condition. Considerable excitement prevails, as it is reported that a number of Graggs' friends are expected here, who will attempt to take Raines. He is at his father's home, and is guarded by a score of resolute railroad men, and should the mob make the attempt there will be bloodshed. []



---

[] Excerpt from "City and Vicinity." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. January 25, 1889. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1889-01-25/ed-1/seq-3/

[January 25, 1889] -

One Man Killed and Another one Wounded. -- Daniel O'Mally's through freight was switching at Pittsburg Tuesday and two of his brakemen, Joe Prewitt and Jim Raines, were joking each other while they were passing over the box cars attending to their duties, when Tom Stringer and Sam Gragg, two characters noted for their meanness, pretended that they believed Prewitt and Raines intended their jocular remarks for them. After Raines had informed them in a gentlemanly manner that they were talking among themselves about themselves, Stringer, desirous of raising a disturbance, drew his pistol and cursed them and finally commenced shooting at them. Young Raines, who had a pistol in his pocket and who had considerable trouble in getting it out, was unable to defend himself until Stringer had shot a number of times, and Prewitt, who was unarmed, climbed from the box car to the caboose thus leaving Raines to fight the battle alone. A number of shots were fired, one ball from Raines' pistol taking effect in Gragg's shoulder and ranging downward, struck the heart, killing him instantly and one from Stringer hitting Raines in the hip, making a painful wound. Gragg, who was with Stringer, it is thought fired not a single shot and no pistol was found on him when he was picked up from where he fell, but he urged Stringer to continue firing and no doubt would have assisted him had he been armed. Raines was taken to London, where his wound was dressed and afterwards brought to his father's near this place. Stringer has not yet been arrested. When Mr. O'Mally's train returned about 10 o'clock Tuesday night a squad of men with shot guns and Winchester rifles surrounded the depot, intending no doubt to take Raines off and kill him, but the train failed to stop and no further damage was done. The Stringers have declared vengeance on Raines and being of revengeful natures they will no doubt carry out their threats. Gragg, who was killed, lived for many years in this county and made himself notorious by participating in numerous robberies and thefts enacted at and near McKinney, and only a few years ago he with his brother killed a negro, for which he failed to get his just deserts. Stringer is considered a dangerous man, and is related to the Stringer who was a pal of Gragg while he lived in this county. It was rumored that Stringer and other friends of Gragg started to Rowland to take Raines out and hang him, but the report was either untrue or their hearts failed them before their journey's end was reached. []

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

[] Excerpt from "News in Brief." The Evening Bulletin, Maysville, KY. February 19, 1889. Page 4. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87060190/1889-02-19/ed-1/seq-4/

[February 19, 1889] -


Henry Worley, charged, with ten other persons, with the murder of Lee Troxtile, at Somerset, Ky., has been arrested. []



-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

[] Excerpt from "London, Laurel County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 28, 1889. Page 4. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1889-05-28/ed-1/seq-4/

[May 28, 1889] -

Tom Hansford, three other men and a cyprian named Lizzie Tucker, were tried for the murder of John Hardick, who was found dead by the railroad near East Bernstadt 2 months ago. The jury failed to agree until 9 o'clock Sunday morning, when a verdict of not guilty was rendered. Hansford was held for false swearing in the case, and he is also under bond for robbing the depot last winter. The young man will probably get there yet. []




-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

[] Excerpt from "News Condensed." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. July 26, 1889. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1889-07-26/ed-1/seq-2/

[July 26, 1889] -


Wm. Baugh and Green Flynn, at Faubush, Pulaski, were wrestling, when Baugh's brother struck Flynn on the head with a hand spike, crushing the skull. Drs. Warren and Perkins removed the skull and found that death resulted from concussion of the brain. []




---

[] Excerpt from Column 1. The Courier Journal, Louisville, KY. July 26, 1889. Page 2. Newspapers.com.

[July 26, 1889] -


Tuesday was a good day for killing in Kentucky. John Rose was assassinated from ambush in Powell county. Evan S. Warren was killed by three negroes at Danville. Wm. Baugh murdered Green Flynn near Somerset with a handspike and Miss Mary Gilders, the victim of a seducer, committed suicide near the same place. []









-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

[] Excerpt from "City and Vicinity." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. July 26, 1889. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1889-07-26/ed-1/seq-3/

[July 26, 1889] -

MURDERED. -- Mr. Evan S. Warren, who was a brother of Hon R. C. Warren, was shot by a negro named Beatty Wickliffe at the Danville depot, Monday afternoon and died that night at 10:30. He and the negro had had a difficulty in the morning when the latter remarked that he would see him again. He was as good as his word as the following dying declaration of Mr. Warrens hows:

A half hour before his death he made substantially the following statement: 'I believe that I am going to die. The circumstances attending the shooting are as follows: I went to the debot in the omnibus, got out and went into the ladies' waiting room. As I came out Beatty Wickliffe came out of the men's waiting room and followed me to the south end of the platform, glaring at me, and with his right hand in his pocket. As he came up to me he began drawing his pistol. I fired at him and he ran. Just as I fired, Bob Mayho and Flem Murphy, both colored, seized me, one by each arm and wrist, and while they were still holding me Wickliffe, who had run away out of sight, came back, and coming close to me shot me several times."

The murder has caused much excitement in Danville and there is a question as to whether the negroes were holding Mr. Warren as peacemakers or accomplices. They had not been arrested at last accounts, the authorities preferring to await the result of the examining trial. Mr. Warren was a warm-hearted, whole-souled man and leaves many friends, who sincerely regret his untimely taking off. He was conscious nearly up to the last and in response to his brother Dick's question, said he would like to talk with Rev. Dr. Green. He was sent for and after praying with and for him, had a very satisfactory talk on spiritual matters. The funeral occurred Wednesday at Danville, after a service by Dr. Green, and was largely attended. The family, and especially Mr. R. C. Warren, whose engagements must be irksome to him under the circumstances, have the hearty sympathy of everybody. []



-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1889. Laurel. Jones / ?. not on timeline

[] Excerpt from "London, Laurel County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. July 30, 1889. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1889-07-30/ed-1/seq-1/

[July 30, 1889] -

It is now believed that the man Jones, who was run over by the cars at Barbourville last Sunday night, was murdered and placed on the track, as a club with considerable blood on it was found near by. []




-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1889. Pulaski or Garrard? Sharp / Goodman. not on timeline

[] Excerpt from "News Condensed." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. August 27, 1889. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1889-08-27/ed-1/seq-2/

[August 27, 1889] -

Henry Goodman plunged a knife to the hilt into the breast of D. J. Sharp in a magistrate's court in Pulaski, when he made at a sister of Goodman who had called him a liar. Sharp expired immediately. []




---

6th col says this is not somerset ? (buckeyetown = buckeye, garrard ???)

[] Excerpt from "The Commonwealth." The Hickman Courier, Hickman, KY. Septemer 6, 1889. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052141/1889-09-06/ed-1/seq-1/

[September 6, 1889] -


D. J. Sharp was stabbed to death at Buckeyetown by Henry Goodman, with whose sister Sharp had quarrelled. []




-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Pulaski. Bowman / ? ? ?. not on timeline.

[] Excerpt from "Sparks From The Wire." The Evening Bulletin, Maysville, KY. September 1, 1890. Page 4. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87060190/1890-09-01/ed-1/seq-4/

[September 1, 1890] -

Andy Bowman, wanted at Somerset, Ky., for murder, was arrested at Birmingham, Ala., Saturday. It is said he has killed three men. He was heavily armed when captured. []





-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

[] Excerpts from "Report of Persons Murdered in the State of Kentucky from July 1, 1867 to July 1, 1868." Report of the Secretary of War. Executive Documents of The House of Representatives during the Third Session of the Fortieth Congress, 1868-1869. Pages 191 to ___. Googlebooks.

Report is from a letter by S. Burbank with the Freedmen's Bureau who says it's an incomplete list of murders that have come to the attention of bureau agents.

Victim Name / Complexion / Murderer / Complexion / When / Where / Remarks

Albert L. Jones / White / Dr. Metcalfe / White / Aug --, 1867 / Garrardsburg / No indictment found.

Major J. H. Bridgewater / White / Tom Sanders, et al / White / Jully 18, 1867 / Lincoln County / Acquitted before the examining court. (sep. draft post in progress)

Courtney Green / colored / J. Brent Aikin / White / Sept. 1, 1867 / Boyle County / Acquitted by civil court; case carried to U.S. court (in leads)

2 men unknown / White / Unknown / ... / April 30, 1868 / Pulaski county / No arrest

James Cheaney / White / Andrew Decker / White / May --, 1868 / Pulaski county / in jail awaiting trial by civil court. (in reg. draft post)

James Baker / White / Unknown / ... / June 13, 1868 / Pulaski county / No arrest. (in reg. draft post)


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

[] Excerpts from "List of Pardons." List of pardons granted by Governor Luke P. Blackburn, from September 3, 1879 to March 23, 1881. Kentucky Legislative Documents, Volumes 2 and 3. Pages 4 through 26. Googlebooks.

Date Pardoned / Name / County / Offense 

Sept. 22, 1879. / A. G. Cosby / Boyle / Manslaughter (in leads)
Sept. 22, 1879. / James Bishop / Whitley / Manslaughter
Oct. 3, 1879. / William McCoy / Garrard / Murder (in leads)
Oct. 8, 1879. / Peter Goff / Rockcastle / Manslaughter (in leads)
Oct. 10, 1879. / T. F. Edwards / Boyle / Manslaughter
Nov. 14, 1879. / E. D. Kennedy / Garrard / Murder (in leads)
Nov. 14, 1879. / Wm. F. Kennedy / Garrard / Murder (in leads)
Dec. 19, 1879. / James J. Richardson / Wayne / Misconduct in office
Jan. 15, 1880. / John Cain / Lincoln / Arson (in leads)
Jan. 23, 1880. / William Mayfield / Garrard / Malicious wounding (in non-fatal)
Mar. 31, 1880. / Thos. J. Stone / Madison / Shooting and wounding
Apr. 12, 1880. / Aquilla Riddell / Pulaski / Manslaughter (in leads)
Apr. 15, 1880. / Shelt. Chambers / Madison / Malicious wounding
Apr. 25, 1880. / Robert Ferrill / Garrard / Concealed weapons 
May 5, 1880. / Wm. Johnson / Rockcastle / Horse-stealing &c.
Jun. 14, 1880. / Logan Sally / Wayne / Malicious wounding (in non-fatal)
Aug. 28, 1880. / W. M. Howard / Laurel / Malicious shooting
Dec. 29, 1880. / Samuel Holmes / Pulaski / Manslaughter (view)
Jan. 29, 1881. / Lloyd B. McCurry / Laurel / Horse-stealing
Mar. 1, 1881. / C. K. Humber / Lincoln / Malicious wounding


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

[] "Remarkable Contrast in Pardon Records." The Courier-Journal, Louisville, KY. August 29, 1903. Page 2. Newspapers.com.

Name / Crime / Sentence / County / Rec'd / Pardoned

Frankfort Penitentiary by Gov. Beckham
Ellis, Frank / Manslaughter / 21 / Lincoln / July 7, 1896 / May 8, 1900
Daugherty, H. C. / Manslaughter / 2 / Whitley / May 29, 1900 / Sept 13, 1900
Pence, Alex. / Manslaughter / 10 / Madison / July 27, 1899 / Nov 5, 1900
McDowell, Jno. / Murder / Life / Whitley / Oct 23, 1882 / Nov 29, 1900
King, John / Manslaughter / 21 / Whitley / Dec 19, 1893 / Jan 1, 1901
Ferrill, E. M. / Murder / 10 / Lincoln / Oct. 11, 1893 / June 1, 1901

Watkins, Jack / Manslaughter / 2 / Laurel / June 5, 1901 / July 16, 1901 (view)
Johnson, Morgan / Murder / Life / Rockcastle / Aug 25, 1884 / May 23, 1902 (view)
Bryant, J. C. / Manslaughter / 7 / Whitley / April 9, 1901 / Feb 9, 1903
Huffaker, Shelby / Manslaughter / 5 / Wayne / June 25, 1901 / Feb 24, 1903
Philpot, Millard / Manslaughter / 14 / Laurel / October 27, 1902 / March 14, 1903 

Frankfort Penitentiary by Gov. Wm. O. Bradley
Fain, Wm. / Manslaughter / 17 / Rockcastle / Nov 23, 1892 / Dec 24, 1895 (view)
Washington, Geo. / Murder / Life / Whitley / May 5, 1885 / Jan 28, 1896 
Doolin, Wm. R. / Manslaughter / 8 / Pulaski / June 27, 1894 / Mar 26, 1896 (view)
Spradlin, Eli. / Murder / Life / Whitley / Feb 22, 1886 / April 28, 1896
Hammer, John / Manslaughter / 2 / Boyle / Sept 30, 1895 / June 4, 1896
Cane, Pat / Manslaughter / 3 / Boyle / Feb 5, 1895 / July 14, 1896
Norfleet, Wyatt / Manslaughter / 2 / Wayne / Jan 30, 1896 / July 30, 1896 (view)
Coffey, Louis / Manslaughter / 2 / Wayne / Mar 11, 1896 / Aug 15, 1896 (in leads)
Crabtree, Peter / Manslaughter / 5 / Pulaski / Apr 18, 1895 / Sept 5, 1896 (need follow up)
Ward, George / Manslaughter / 5 / Boyle / Feb 1, 1893 / Sept 14, 1896
Woods,  Horace / Manslaughter / 3 / Garrard / Sept 11, 1895 / Sept 16, 1896
Tuttle, Simeon / Manslaughter / 3 / Laurel / Nov 27, 1896 / Dec 3, 1896 (view)
Garth, Mary / Murder / Life / Pulaski / Nov 29, 1893 / Dec 3,1895 
Barclay, Geo / Kukluxing / 3/4 / Rockcastle / June 3, 1896 / Dec 8, 1896
Freeman, John / Manslaughter / 21 / Madison / Sept 30, 1884 / Dec 10, 1896
Young, Charlie / Manslaughter / 2 / Laurel / Feb 23, 1896 / March 16, 1897 
Adams, Jack / Manslaughter / 6 / Rockcastle / Feb 20, 1896 / April 10, 1897 (view)
Clark, Nancy / Concealing Birth of child / 1 / Laurel / May 29, 1897 / June 24, 1897
Tuttle, Alex / Manslaughter / 15 / Laurel / Feb 1, 1896 / June 24, 1897
Bowman, James / Manslaughter / 4 / Whitley / Feb 11, 1895 / Oct 7, (1897?)
Eldridge, Robert / Manslaughter / 5 / Pulaski / June 26, 1897 / Nov 6, 1897 (in leads) 
Davis, Tolbert / Manslaughter / 5 / Pulaski / Nov 29, 1895 / Mar 23, 1898
Jarrett, John / Murder / 3 / Rockcastle / June 10, 1898 / Mar 24, 1899   (view)
Sharp, Albert / Murder / Life / Pulaski / May 1, 1886 / May 22, 1899 (in leads)
Green, Milt / Manslaughter / 5 / Laurel / Feb 27, 1899 / June 20, 1899
Young, Will / Manslaughter / 2 / Whitley / Jan 27, 1899 / Sept 19, 1899 (view)
Cox, Will / Manslaughter / 2 / Whitley / Jan 27, 1899 / Sept 19, 1899 (view)
Kidd, George / Manslaughter / 2 / Whitley / Jan 27, 1899 / Sept 19, 1899 (view)
Reedy, James / Manslaughter / 21 / Whitley / Aug 24, 1897 / Sept 22, 1899
Todd, William / Murder / 30 / Madison / Nov 1894 / Dec 6, 1899 

Eddyville Penitentiary by Gov. Wm. O. Bradley
Ferrell, John / Murder / Life / Lincoln / May 6, 1879 / June 29, 1897 (
Merritt, W. R. / Murder / Life / Pulaski / May 8, 1883 / May 19, 1899  (view)
King, Isham / Murder / Life / Whitley / April 20, 1887 / Feb 29, 1896

Frankfort Penitentiary by Gov. John Young Brown
Dizney, Thos. / Murder / Life / Laurel / Nov 7, 1887 / March 10, 1892 (view)
Wilder, William / Manslaughter / 6 / Madison / Sept 7, 1891 / May 20, 1893
Henry, William / Murder / Life / Pulaski / May 14, 1884 / Aug 29, 1894 
Fee, Granville / Murder / Life / Whitley / Oct 8, 1891 / July 3, 1895
Powl, Odie / Manslaughter / 8 / Lincoln / May 30, 1894 / Sept 24, 1895
Miller, William / Manslaughter / 4 / Boyle / February 1, 1893 / November 18, 1893
Morris, Robert / Manslaughter / 12 / Laurel / May 2, 1889 / Dec 6, 1893 (view)

Eddyville Penitentiary by Gov. John Young Brown
Coyle, Henry / Murder / Life / Pulaski / [blank] / [blank] (view)
Embry, James / Murder / Life / Lincoln / Nov 27, 1884 / Nov 13, 1893
Jones, C. Z. / Manslaughter / 3 / Pulaski / Oct 22, 1890 / Apr 24, 1893 (view)
Minor, A. F. / Murder / Life / Lincoln / Aug 17, 1883 / November 29, 1893
Leavell, G. / Manslaughter / 15 / Garrard / Sept 2, 1890 / Sept 13, 1893
Smith, Lewis C. / Manslaughter / 12 / Whitley / July 23, 1889 / Aug 20, 1893
Brooks, Richard / Murder / Life / Madison / June 27, 1879 / Nov 13, 1895





No comments:

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...