January 1, 2013

1880 TO 1899 murder leads

this is a draft post published as backup. these are all cases I need more info on. I'm in the process of adding them to the timeline also


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Garrard. 1880? not on timeline

W. A. Arnold was indicted in the Garrard Circuit Court for the murder of one Robert Boyle




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Lincoln County? 1880? not on timeline

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. March 12, 1880. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1880-03-12/ed-1/seq-3/

[March 12, 1880] -

MURDER. -- Constantine Taylor, the man who was so seriously cut and shot by Enoch and Sam Upthegrove,  and Mae Young some time ago, died Monday of his injuries. County Attorney, W. H. Miller, thereupon changed the charge to murder, and ordered the re-arrest of the party, and the Upthegroves were taken and lodged in jail here Tuesday. Young has fled the country. The Upthegroves were taken to the Highland yesterday for an examining trial, but the case was postponed till next Tuesday, and they were returned to jail. []




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[] Excerpt from "." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. March 19, 1880. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1880-03-19/ed-1/seq-3/

[March 19, 1880] -

THE EXAMINING TRIAL.-- Of the Upthegroves' for the murder of Constantine Taylor was called on Tuesday, but postponed until to-day to allow the doctors time to disinter the body and decide upon the immediate cause of his death. Coroner Goode held the inquest yesterday, when the physicians, Drs. Bronaugh and Moore, on examination decided that, although there was a fracture of the skull, in the immediate cause of his death was pneumonia one lung being nearly gone. The jury therefore found a verdict to that effect. []


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same case?

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. October 28, 1881. Page 3. LOC.

[October 28, 1881] -

Sam Upthegrove forfeited his bond for shooting with intent to kill. The case was continued, and a bench warrant ordered to be issued.

Sam Upthegrove, for carrying concealed weapons, was fined $25 and given ten days in jail. He did not put in an appearance. []




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Rockcastle County. Last week in March 1880. added to timeline

[] Excerpt from Column 6. The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. April 2, 1880. Page 3. LOC.

[April 2, 1880] -

A Fatal Shooting Affray occurred at J. B. Kerby & Co.'s tan-yard, in Rockcastle county, on Monday evening last. W. G. Smith, formerly of Lancaster, and Jas. Hagerty, of Louisville, the former store-keeper and the latter foreman of the tanyard, became involved in a dispute over the breaking of two lamp chimneys in Hagerty's shop by an employee Smith had sent there to barrel some refuse tallow. Hagerty had gone into the store to get some new chimneys, and angry words having passed between the two men, Hagerty advanced towards Smith, who stood behind the counter with a double-barreled shot-gun near him. When Hagerty came opposite to Smith the latter raised the weapon and fired, the muzzle almost touching Hagerty's face. The latter received the entire contents of one barrel, which entered the right corner of his mouth, tore most of the flesh from the right cheek, and came out just behind the right ear. The unfortunate man has been in semi-comatose condition since the shooting, and physicians say his recovery is almost impossible. Hagerty's wife, who resides in Louisville, was telegraphed, and arrived here Tuesday evening--at once proceeding to the scene of the tragedy, where she arrived at 2 o'clock next morning. Smith has not been arrested yet, but efforts are being made to secure him. []




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Sam Campbell / Huston, Lincoln, 1881. not on timeline

[] Excerpt from "Lincoln County." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. Oct 7, 1881. Page 3.

[October 7, 1881] - 

Sam Campbell, whose examination was had at McKinney on Saturday, on the charge of killing Huston, was adjudged justified. []




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Conn / McCoy. 1881? Lincoln. not on timeline

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. Oct 28, 1881. Page 3.

[October 28, 1881] -

The trial of S. B. Conn, for the murder of McCoy, was set for the 8th day of the term, November 1st. []





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[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. Oct 28, 1881. Page 3.

[October 28, 1881] -

The case against Wm. Gresham and John Reid, for the murder of Cam Roswey, was called, but owing to the absence of an important witness, was continued by the Commonwealth till the Spring term. []




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Mullins,  White, Rains / George Adams. 1881? Lincoln. not on timeline

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. Oct 28, 1881. Page 3.

[October 28, 1881] -

The trial of the negroes, Mullins, White and Rains, for the murder of George Adams, was set for Thursday of next week. []


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1881? this is Clay County change of venue case. not on timeline

[] Excerpt from "." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. March 18, 1881. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1881-03-18/ed-1/seq-2/

[March 18, 1881] -

Circuit Court will convene next Monday at London, in Laurel county. The case of the Commonwealth vs. B. P. Simpson for the murder of James White will probably be again tried at this term. It will be remembered that this case has been twice tried already, and the result in each trial was a hung jury. []



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[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. July 25, 1882. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1882-07-25/ed-1/seq-3/

[July 25, 1882] -

THE LAWS DELAY.-- Bart Simpson, who several years ago, killed the County Clerk of Clay and who had four times been on trial for the offence, was acquitted at London, Friday. There were hung juries in three of the trials. The length of time since the killing and the fact that Col. W. O. Bradley was of counsel for the defense the last time, accounts for the result. Judge DeHaven, of the Shelbyville District, presided. []


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[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon Department." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. July 25, 1882. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1882-07-25/ed-1/seq-3/

[July 25, 1882] -

In the Laurel Circuit Court last week, Judge S. E. DeHaven sitting as special judge, B. P. Simpson, charged with murder, was acquitted. He had been three times tried beforee, each trial resulting in a hung jury. Simpson killed James White, clerk of the Clay County Court, several years ago. In addition to his former strong array of counsel, he was defended at his last trial by Hon. W. O. Bradley. []



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Pulaski. 1880. added to timeline

[] Excerpt from "Notes of Current Events." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. April 30, 1880. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1880-04-30/ed-1/seq-2/

[April 30, 1880] -

A reward of $200 has been offered by the Governor for Millard Gilpin charged with murder in Pulaski. []



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[] Excerpt from "Notes of Current Events." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 14, 1880. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1880-05-14/ed-1/seq-2/

[May 14, 1880] -

Millard Gilpin, the murderer of Givens has been caught in Pulaski. The reward offered by the State did the business. []



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[] Excerpt from "." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. April 14, 1882. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1882-04-14/ed-1/seq-2/  Jim Gilpin, pardoned murderer??
[] Excerpt from "." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. April 20, 1883. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1883-04-20/ed-1/seq-2/ Scott Gilpin, same person?
[] Excerpt from "." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 8, 1883. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1883-05-08/ed-1/seq-2/ scott gilpin


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1881. Pulaski County. not on timeline

[] "A Gory Head Without the Body." Cincinnati Daily Gazette, Cincinnati, OH.  May 14, 1881. Page 10. Genealogybank.com.

[May 14, 1881] -


A Gory Head Without the Body.

Special Dispatch to the Cincinnati Gazette.

SOMERSET, KY., May 13. -- The dog of Mr. Gastineau, of the eastern portion of this county, brought the head of a man into his yard last evening. On examination, the head was recognized as belonging to a stock trader who disappeared in a very mysterious manner a few days ago. Decomposition had not set in. The body has not been found yet. [] 



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[] "Another Kentucky Murder Mystery." Cincinnati Commercial Tribune, Cincinnati, OH.. May 28, 1881. Page 1. Genealogybank.com.

[May 28, 1881] -

Another Kentucky Murder Mystery

Special to the Cincinnati Commercial.

SOMERSET, KY., May 27 -- Yesterday while some boys were fishing near Somerset, in a small creek, the body of a man was found. His body was somewhat lacerated, and blood had oozed from his mouth and nose. He was carried to a near house and searched, but as yet no clue to the killing has been discovered. The man's name is unknown.

Three affairs of this kind have transpired in the last week. The body of Lewis Gosset was found on Tuesday, and Wm. Durham was killed by Mulony on Sunday. These affairs were, however, about the railroad and among railroad men. []


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1881. Knox. not on timeline

[] Excerpt from "The Commonwealth." The Courier Journal, Louisville, KY. September 23, 1881. Page 7. Newspapers.com.

[September 23, 1881] -

Stanford correspondence in the Danville Advocate: George and Evan Messer were put in jail here last Friday, charged with two cases of murder. In one they were allowed bail in the sum of $1,500, and in the other they were not allowed any bail. The murder was committed in Knox county, Ky., last August a year ago. One of the men killed was name Bingham. I couldn't learn the name of the other man killed. A brother of these Messers was tried at the last term of the Knox Circuit Court and sentenced to the penitentiary for seven years for these murders. He was taken to the penitentiary at the same time these prisoners were brought here. It was thought best for their safe keeping to bring them here for confinement, as other murders had been committed in Knox county, which had exasperated the people there to such an extent that it was feared that these men might either be liberated or lynched. []



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1881? Rockcastle. not on timeline

[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon Department." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. October 28, 1881. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1881-10-28/ed-1/seq-2/

[October 28, 1881] -

James Burton, who shot and killed Samuel Edmonson at Livingston some time ago, was acquitted upon his examining trial before Esquires Pike and Calloway, last Friday, on the ground that he acted in self-defense. []


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Rockcastle? 1881. not on timeline

[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon Department."  The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. December 9, 1881. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1881-12-09/ed-1/seq-3/

[December 9, 1881] -

On last Sunday morning, at Reedsville, a difficulty occurred between Wm. Roberts an old man, and one King, a young man, who had been working for Roberts, over the paltry sum of six dollars. Roberts made at King with his cane, when the latter drew his little pistol and tried to shoot the former, but the pistol happened to be out of tune and failed to fire. The latter (King), then drew his dirk and commenced to carve the old man, cutting him some several times in the abdomen and ribs, the wounds proving fatal in about half an hour. King is still in the neighborhood but has not been arrested. []






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[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon Department." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. December 16, 1881. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1881-12-16/ed-1/seq-2/

[December 16, 1881] -

King, the man who killed Roberts, an account of which killing was published last week, has not yet been arrested. He had a consultation with his lawyer last week, and concluded to wait awhile before surrendering himself into custody. []




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[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. January 31, 1882. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1882-01-31/ed-1/seq-3/

[January 31, 1882] -

DEAD.-- Tom Jasper, who was shot some time ago by W. C. Owens, in Somerset, died Sunday.



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[] Excerpt from "Notes of Current Events." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. December 22, 1882. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1882-12-22/ed-1/seq-2/

[December 22, 1882] -

A damage suit for $10,000 has been brought against W. C. Owens at Somerset, for killing Jasper last year. []



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Lincoln or Pulaski? 1881.  not on timeline

[] Excerpt from "Notes of Current Events." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. February 4, 1881. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1881-02-04/ed-1/seq-2/

[February 4, 1881] -

William McKinney and Columbus Cass, of Pulaski county, two leading lights in the Methodist Church, settled an old feud last Mond[a]y, while working the county road. The manner was after the usual style of such settlements. Cass took an ax, and knocking McKinney down, beat his head into a jelly and fled. Cass was Superintendent of a Sunday School, but it is not likely that he will be on hand next Sunday. []




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Cobb / Decker. Rockcastle County. 1881? not on timeline

[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon Department." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. December 2, 1881. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1881-12-02/ed-1/seq-2/

[December 2, 1881] -

A recent dispatch to the Enquirer from Frankfort states that Governor Blackburn has offered a reward of $100 each for the apprehension of Martin Cobb and Radford Cobb, indicted in the Circuit Court here for manslaughter. []


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[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon Department." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. February 24, 1882. Page 2. LOC.

[February 24, 1882] -

Some two or three years since, two men by the name of Cobb, brothers, killed a man named Decker. All the parties lived in the Southern portion of this county. The Cobbs were tried by an examining Court and acquitted; they immediately left the county and went to Knox county, and some months ago they went to Henryville, Ind. They were indicted in this [Rockcastle] county, and a reward offered by the Governor for their arrest and conviction. Deputy Sheriff Wm. McGee and Constable Wat. Killion, of Laurel county, went out there and brought them to this place on last Wednesday. They are now in jail in default of one thousand dollars bail each. []




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[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. February 28, 1882. Page 3. LOC.

[February 28, 1882] -

FOR SAFE KEEPING. -- The Cobb Brothers recently arrested in Indiana, and brought to Mt. Vernon, for the murder of a man named Decker, some time since, were delivered to the Jailer here Friday, by Sheriff W. H. Albright and F. L. Thompson, for safe keeping. This makes six prisoners in the jail charged with murder. []




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[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon Department." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. August 18, 1882. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1882-08-18/ed-1/seq-2/

[August 18, 1882] -

The trial of the two Cobbs, now in the Stanford jail, who are indicted for manslaughter, is set down for next Tuesday. []



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[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon Department." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. August 25, 1882. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1882-08-25/ed-1/seq-3/

[August 25, 1882] -

Martin and Radford Cobb, who has been confined in the Stanford jail charged with manslaughter were brought here [Mt. Vernon] for trial Tuesday. For a wonder both sides were ready, a severance of the cases was had, and the trial of Martin Cobb was begun. The testimony showed a plain case of self-defense and the jury after a few moments deliberation returned a verdict of not guilty. Mr. Warren then very properly filed away the case against Radford Cobb. []




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June 1882. Lincoln County. not on timeline.

[] Excerpt from "City and Vicinity." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. October 26, 1888. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1888-10-26/ed-1/seq-3/

[October 26, 1888] -

CIRCUIT COURT. -- The trial of Samuel Combs for the murder of James Mounce was begun Tuesday evening by the selection of the following jury: L. D. Garner, Eugene Kelley, A. J. Hayden, L. K. Wells, G. D. Hopper, J. B. McKinney, N. W. DePauw, T. J. Hill, R. G. Collier, Harry Dunn, Thomas Metcalf and G. D. Wearen. It will be remembered that Combs did the killing in June 1882, immediately after which he fled to Texas, from whence he was recently brought by J. N. Menefee. The trouble occurred over a wrestle, both parties being under the influence of liquor. The Commonwealth's witnesses made out a pretty severe case of murder, but the jury after hearing the other side evidently did not believe their story, as they brought in a verdict of acquittal in less than five minutes after going to their room Wednesday night. Mr. C. C. Williams, of Mt. Vernon, assisted the Commonwealth and the prisoner was represented by Col. Welch and R. C. Warren. []



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Whitley or Pulaski? 1882. not on timeline

[] Excerpt from "Notes of Current Events." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. January 31, 1882. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1882-01-31/ed-1/seq-2/

[January 31, 1882] -

M. A. Moore, proprietor of the hotel at Williamsburg, Whitley county, shot and killed Hannibal Ross, who was making at him with a drawn knife. []



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[] Excerpt from "State News." The South Kentuckian, Hopkinsville, KY. February 14, 1882. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86069392/1882-02-14/ed-1/seq-1/

[February 14, 1882] -

M. A. Moore shot and killed Hannibal Ross at Somerset, Ky., in self-defense. []




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Lincoln County. 1882. not on timeline.

[] Excerpt from "Two Murders."  Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY.  February 14, 1882. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1882-02-14/ed-1/seq-3/

[February 14, 1882] -

The second murder is that of John Carr, a very industrious and worthy colored man, who was shot dead as he sat with his family, at his home on Dr. Montgomery's place. The shot was fired through the window, and at the Coroner's inquest held yesterday by Squire W. R. Carson, the following facts were elicited: His wife testified that the old man had just returned from a meeting at Turnersville, and was sitting playing with a little child, when the report was heard. He fell over and died immediately, seven buckshot having penetrated his head. Eleven more shot were found embedded in the wall on a line with the others. It was a first thought that the child was also shot, but upon examination it was found that only a piece of the broken glass had struck it. As nothing, pointing to the perpetrator of the murder was adduced, the inquest adjourned until to-day, hoping to find some clue to the act. []



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[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. February 17, 1882. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1882-02-17/ed-1/seq-3/

[February 17, 1882] -


Two negroes, Jim Ingram and Jim Embry, have been arrested and are now in jail for the murder of John Carr last Sunday night. The Coroner's jury has had several meetings and examined a number of witnesses, but being unable yet to find a verdict, has adjourned till Saturday. There is no direct evidence so far against either of the men arrested, though enough of suspicious circumstances have been revealed to hold them for examination. The bottom of the whole matter seems to have been in a church quarrel. John Carr, who was a respectable and honest man, and a steward in the church, objected to such penitentiary birds as Ingram and Embry, both have served terms for stealing, exercising as much church authority as they imposed on themselves, and a bad feeling had been smouldering in their breasts for some time, and there are rumors afloat that they had made threats against him. Ingram's actions on Sunday night and Monday morning are much against him, and although "he doth over much protest" his innocence, he may yet feel the halter draw. The colored people are greatly excited, and whispers of mobbing the guilty party are heard. []




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Lincoln County. 1882. not on timeline.

[] Excerpt from "Two Murders."  Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY.  February 14, 1882. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1882-02-14/ed-1/seq-3/

[February 14, 1882] -


TWO MURDERS.

Robbery the Incentive of One, Revenge the Other.

Two more bloody murder are added to the already bloody record of Lincoln county. On Saturday night, John Shanks, a wealthy farmer, living near Crab Orchard, was shot in the head and neck with squirrel shot fired from a gun, while between his crib and stable, and on Sunday morning was found there cold and stiff by a servant who came to feed his stock. He gave the alarm, when neighbors came in and examined both the body and the premises. His safe keys were found in his pocket, although he was seen with some $20 notes, while in Crab Orchard, the evening before. Mr. Shanks was an eccentric genius, and although possessed of some $50,000 to $60,000 lived like a miser, alone and uncared for. He was always feared that his life would be taken as it has been and had repeatedly told of robbers and others coming to his house at night, but owing to his cranky spells, his stories were not believed. At present no clue to the bloody deed has been divulged, though knowing ones look wise and confident that all will come out in a day or two. The body of the murdered man was taken to his sister's, Mrs. Sarah J. Wells, where it was properly cared for, and from whence it was taken to Crab Orchard Cemetery for interment at 3:30 yesterday evening. From Dr. J. B. Owsley, who attended the burial, we learn that Henry Johnson, the negro who found the dead body, has been arrested for the murder, there being some suspicious circumstances against him. From all that we can learn, however, these are very slight, and we trust that no poor negro will be unjustly made the scape grace of the perpetrator of the deed, as in a former case from that end of the county. []



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[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. February 17, 1882. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1882-02-17/ed-1/seq-3/

[February 17, 1882] -


The Shanks Murder. -- There have been no fresh developments in this matter, but there are rumors afloat that a flood-gate of light will be unloosed at the examining trial of the negro Henry Johnson to-day. It is not thought that he is the perpetrator of the deed, but that he knows all about it, it is almost certain. The real murderer is said to be a white man, and the same who has been suspected of the numerous other robberies in that end of the county. The County Attorney, Mr. Miller, intends to make a searching investigation, and if possible bring the right man to justice. []





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1883. Lincoln County. not on timeline

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. November 6, 1885. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1885-11-06/ed-1/seq-3/

[November 6, 1885] -

The trial of Dolph Bailey, who killed Howard Dudley, another negro in 1883, resulted in his acquittal, the jury retiring but a few minutes. Hon T. P. Hill, Jr., distinguished himself in the defense in this case and made a speech, which showed from what block he was chipped. []



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[] "A Man-Devil." Cincinnati Post, Cincinnati, OH. July 10, 1883. Page 1. Genealogybank.com.

[July 10, 1883] -

A MAN-DEVIL.

William Eades, Rapist, Murderer, and Thief, is Arrested in Missouri and Brought Back to Somerset.

SPECIAL TO THE PENNY POST.

SOMERSET, KY., July 10. -- William Eades, arrested by the sheriff of Adams co., Missouri, for stealing a horse, was brought from that state and jailed here yesterday, to answer for many crimes committed in this vicinity. He is about 35, and was born in what is known as the "White Oaks." This section of Pulaski co. was always prolific of rogues, thieves, and murderers. When 17 he was the trusted farm hand of a man named Moses Muncey near Mill Springs, Wayne co. One night he crept through the bed-room window of Muncey's 16 year-old daughter, Hannah, satisfied his evil passions, and made his escape. He disappeared for a time, but came upon the surface again as one of the Cooper men--a gang of the most desperate characters that ever infested southern Kentucky. He took part in the well-remembered fight between the Cooperites and ku-klux at Somerset, in which seven ku-klux and five of Cooper's men were killed on the public square. He distinguished himself that day by going to the room of a sick man, in the old National hotel, and murdering him in cold blood, because he was suspected of being a ku-klux. Later he came out on the sidewalk, and, while the warm blood was still dripping from his dirk, put the blade, which had been bent against some of the bones of his victim's body, between his teeth and straightened it, remarking at the time: "The blood of a d--n ku-klux is sweeter than honey." Though he thought that Kentucky justice would never overtake him, he was well aware that the hate of his enemies would soon put a stop to his lawless life, and he fled the country. Gradually the history of his misdeeds passed out of mind, and he ventured back again to his old haunts in White Oak. This time he lived with his decrepid old grandmother, who was a fortune-teller, a reputed witch, and who had an underground bar-room, where she sold moonshine whisky for a lot of illicit distillers. Eades soon engaged in the traffic. He would fill a canoe with several kegs of whisky, and paddle up to Burnside on the Cincinnati Southern railroad, and, as it was a considerable place at this time, sell his liquor and get back to his hiding place before the officers got on his track. One day, while at Burnside, he attempted to kiss the pretty wife of a gentleman who lived there. She told her husband of the insult. He remonstrated with Eades, and was immediately shot dead. This was the last exploit of his in the country. A mob of men followed him through the mountains of Tennessee for three days, but he escaped. His personal description had been sent to most of the sheriffs in the adjacent states, but nothing of his whereabouts was known until the news came of his arrest. []



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[] "Murdered By His Uncle." Wheeling Register, Wheeling, WV. August 20, 1883. Page 1. Genealogybank.com.

[August 20, 1883] -

Murdered By His Uncle.

SOMERSET, KY., August 19. -- Eli Sprague shot his nephew, Wiley Sprague, through the heart, near Pine Knot, last night. No provocation had been given. []


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[] Excerpt from "Pulaski County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. November 2, 1883. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1883-11-02/ed-1/seq-3/

[November 2, 1883] -

PULASKI COUNTY.--The dead body of John Williams was found at the foot of a bluff near Barren Fork, having come to his death by falling over the cliff. Williams and a negro by the name of Rufus Sallee had been out together for a day or two on a drunken spree and there are some suspicions of foul play on the part of the negro. []



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[] Excerpt from "State Notes." The Courier-Journal, Louisville, KY. December 15, 1883. Page 3. Newspapers.com.

[December 15, 1883] -

Rufe Sallee, charged with murdering a man named Williams, whose dead body was found in Pulaski at the foot of a cliff eighty feet high, has been acquitted. []



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[] Excerpt from "Crime and Criminals." Trenton Evening Times, Trenton, NJ. June 2, 1884. Page 4. Genealogybank.com.

[June 2, 1884] -

Two Kentucky Tragedies.

LONDON, Ky., June 2.--On Saturday night, at Pittsburg, a mining town near here, a difficulty occurred between James and Peter Riley and David Jackson on one side, and John Lloyd, Sam Taylor, and John Pressnell on the other, in which James Riley, being pressed by John Lloyd, who had a knife in his hand, drew his pistol and fired, killing him instantly. Riley and Jackson then turned upon Lloyd's two friends with clubs, beating them terribly. They are, however, not thought to be mortally wounded. Riley and Jackson escaped. The sheriff and a posse are pursuing them. At the same place, George Delph, a bank boss, struck Neal Beatty, a colored boy. Beatty drew a pistol and shot Delph in the breast, inflicting a very serious wound. []


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[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. June 3, 1884. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1884-06-03/ed-1/seq-3/

[June 3, 1884] -

Two more murders are added to Laurel county's growing list. In a general row a[t] Pittsburg, Saturday, a man named James Riley shot and instantly killed John Lloyd. Riley and his partner, Jackson, then beat two other men severely with clubs and made good their escape. At the same place later in the day Neal Beatty, a negro boy shot and probably fatally wounded George Delph, a coal bank boss, who struck him over the head. []





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[] Excerpt from "Kentucky Knowledge." Semi-Weekly South Kentuckian, Hopkinsville, KY. May 27, 1884. Page 4. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86069394/1884-05-27/ed-1/seq-4/

[May 27, 1884] -

John Ketcham, was shot and instantly killed by a man named Bowles, in Rockcastle county. []




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[] Excerpt from Column 1. IJ. March 27, 1885. Page 2.

Neal
John Sexton/Sexson
George Bowdon / Rowdon




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Lincoln County. August 1884. not on timeline.

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. November 6, 1885. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1885-11-06/ed-1/seq-3/

[November 6, 1885] -

The trial of John Waddle for the killing of Sam Murphy, at Kings Mountain in August, 1884, was begun Wednesday. The proof was that Murphy had called Waddle a s-n of a b---h and was standing with his knife drawn when the defendant threw a beer bottle against his head, crushing his skull, from which he died. He was only indicted for manslaughter. Col. Thos. Z. Morrow, of Somerset, and Welch & Saufley represented him and the case was argued by Morrow, Saufley and Warren yesterday and submitted. The jury was not long in finding a verdict of involuntary manslaughter and fixing a fine of $50. []





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[] Excerpt from "Notes of Current Events." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. January 27, 1885. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1885-01-27/ed-1/seq-2/

[January 27, 1885] -

A man named Smith was lynched for attempt at rape in Pulaski last week. []


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[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. November 6, 1885. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1885-11-06/ed-1/seq-3/

[November 6, 1885] -

CIRCUIT COURT. -- According to the proof admitted in the trial, there has never been a case before the court here, with but one exception, in which there appeared so little of extenuation as in that of Henry Roberts for the killing of Nick Benedict, which was on trial when we went to press Monday night. The crime amounted almost to assassination and yet the jury after reporting that they could not agree, finally agreed after being held all night Tuesday, to give him but 13 years in the penitentiary, just three more than he agreed to take and not go to trial. We learn from the jury that when they first went to their room they stood six for 21 years and six for a less time, none, however, below five years. The youth of the defendant and the statement which partially came out in proof that Benedict had assaulted Roberts' sister, is all that saved his neck or kept him from a life term. Judge Saufley in arguing the case did not plead for acquittal, but ingeniously worked int he unproven charges to his clients great benefit. Messrs. Robert Harding and R. C. Warren both made strong speeches for the prosecution. []



---

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. November 10, 1885. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1885-11-10/ed-1/seq-3/

[November 10, 1885] -

Henry Roberts was brought out for sentence Friday and the Judge after recalling the atrocity of his crime, which, but for his youth, the jury would have punished with death or life imprisonment, admonished him that he yet had enough of life to make amends and hoped that he would come from the State prison resolved to do so. He then passed the sentence of 13 years on him for the murder of Nick Benedict. Roberts is but 17 years of age. []




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[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. November 6, 1885. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1885-11-06/ed-1/seq-3/

[November 6, 1885] -


George T. Ball was indicted for the murder of his father and a bench warrant has been issued for him. []


---

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. November 13, 1885. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1885-11-13/ed-1/seq-3/

[November 13, 1885] -

The case of George T. Ball for the murder of his father, W. M. Ball, was called Wednesday and a jury obtained without much difficulty as follows: James Robinson, A. B. McKinney, J. J. McKinney, A. D. Root, G. G. Fair, Richard Burnett, L. B. Nunnelley, B. F. Powell, H. E. Marcum, K. L. Tanner, T. J. Bosley, Monroe Smith. The prosecution proved besides the facts of the killing, which were substantially given in this paper at the time of the tragedy, that the defendant had made repeated threats that he would kill the old man. The court then permitted Mrs. Ball, widow of the deceased and mother of the accused to tell why George had made such threats. Her account of the killing was that Mr. Ball came to where she and George were and cursed her about the supper. George remonstrated with him for talking so to her and with an oath he started off saying, "I'd fix you." Returning in a moment with a pistol George ran into the room and as the old man started to fire at him he shot first and hen the witness went out and around the house. The story of her treatment by the man who had promised to love, cherish and protect her, was simply horrible. She said that he began shortly after her marriage to ill use her, but the court only permitted her to testify of matters of which George was personally cognizant. On one occasion he ordered her to go to the still house and bring him a bottle of whisky, also a glass with some sugar in it. She did as directed, but because she brought no water he dashed the glass in her face and threw the bottle at her. At another time because some article of food displeased him he cursed her and threw dish and all against her head. Often he would beat her with a stick and otherwise maltreat her. He positively refused to permit her to attend church and on several occasions had used his stick on George. It was a horrible recital of man's inhumanity and such as stirred to pity the heart of every person present. Mrs. Ball's testimony was fully corroborated by several others and by mutual agreement the case was given to the jury at the close of the testimony without argument. After a short retirement a verdict of acquittal was agreed and at 12 o'clock it was so reported and the prisoner discharged. []


---

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. July 5, 1887. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1887-07-05/ed-1/seq-3/

[July 5, 1887] -

DEATH. -- George Ball, after an illness of four weeks, of a brain and spinal affection, died Saturday afternoon, aged about 26. It will be remembered that he interferred in a row between his father, Billy Ball, and his mother, and that he shot the old man dead when he endeavored to assault him for it. He has been drinking a good deal since the act and that no doubt hastened his death. []



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[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. November 6, 1885. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1885-11-06/ed-1/seq-3/

[November 6, 1885] -


The trial of Robert Chappell for the murder of Joe Jones is set for next Tuesday... []



------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

William Carson / [?][?], Lincoln County, 1885? not on timeline

[] Excerpt from "." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. November 6, 1885. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1885-11-06/ed-1/seq-3/

[November 6, 1885] -

Judge Owsley has not decided upon the application of Carson for a new trial but it is not likely he will grant it. Two juries have pronounced him guilty and none of the last jury, which gave him five years, was for less than two and from that to ten years. Should the judge refuse a new trial, one of the attorneys tells us that he will take the case to the Court of Appeals, while another thinks they have done all for their client that they should do. []


---

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. November 10, 1885. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1885-11-10/ed-1/seq-3/

[November 10, 1885] -

William Carson was also sentenced after he had made a little speech in answer to the Judge's question if he had anything to say why the verdict should not be executed. He acknowledged that he had been given two fair trials, but said his act was in self defense and that therefore he ought not to be punished. The sentence was passed but suspended for 60 days to await the result of an appeal. []



------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. November 10, 1885. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1885-11-10/ed-1/seq-3/

[November 10, 1885] -


The case of R. C. Engleman for shooting Smith Baughman was continued as it likely will be till all the witnesses forget who was shot and who did the shooting. []




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[] Excerpt from "Notes of Current Events." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. December 22, 1885. Page 4. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1885-12-22/ed-1/seq-4/

[December 22, 1885] -


At Beaver creek mines, near Somerset, William Parsons killed Frank Wilson. Charles Gooden and W. A. Owens fatally stabbed two other men, names not known. Parsons escaped, but the other two were arrested. []




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[] Excerpt from Column 2. Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. March 12, 1886. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1886-03-12/ed-1/seq-2/

[March 12, 1886] -


All is quiet at the Greenwood mines. But one company of men and a Gatling gun remain and they are sufficient to protect the convicts and maintain the dignity of the State, which can not afford to permit mobs to force her into terms. []



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Pulaski or Lincoln?

[] Excerpt from "Notes of Current Events." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. April 16, 1886. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1886-04-16/ed-1/seq-2/

[April 16, 1886] -

A Somerset dispatch says: Six men accused of complicity in the murder of Ben Wilson on Indian Creek, on April 1, were brought here by six citizens of that neighborhood, who had armed themselves and captured the men near the scene of the murder. []





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[] Excerpt from "Somerset Notes." The Courier Journal, Louisville, KY. May 2, 1886. Page 5. Newspapers.com.

[May 2, 1886] -

SOMERSET, May 1. -- The young man, Geo. McCarty, suspected of the murder of his uncle, Presley McCarty, who was found dead in his yard last Thursday, has left the country. They were both drinking characters and lived in the same house by themselves. The elder man, when found, was shot in the back, the charge passing through the body and making a large hole. The shotgun was found on his bed. George McCarty, the young man suspected, is about twenty years old and has served a term in the penitentiary. []



---

[] Excerpt from "Somerset Reporter." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 4, 1886. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1886-05-04/ed-1/seq-2/

[May 4, 1886] -


A young man named George McCarty, was found dead near his home this morning. A shot-gun was found on his bed. []





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[] Excerpt from "News and Comment." The Courier-Journal, Louisville, KY. September 10, 1886. Page 1. Newspapers.com.

[September 10, 1886] -

A short time since, George Inman was shot and killed, near Livingston, by a man named St. Clair. Tuesday, while John and Andrew Inman were cleaning their pistols, preparatory to going in search of St. Clair, John was accidentally and fatally shot by his brother. []




---

[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon, Rockcastle County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. September 21, 1886. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1886-09-21/ed-1/seq-2/

[September 21, 1886] -

John St. Clair, of Jackson county, who is charged with killing a blind man named Innman near Livingston, in this county, about two weeks ago, came to the county one day last week and surrendered himself to Squire Gran Clark. He was brought to town and allowed to execute bond for his appearance next Friday, when his examining trial will take place. We are not acquainted with the facts in this case, but it does not seem that there could be any lawful excuse for killing an inoffensive blind man. []





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[] "Arrest of a Murderer." Cincinnati Commercial Tribune, Cincinnati, OH. October 10, 1886. Page 8. Genealogybank.com.

[October 10, 1886] -


ARREST OF A MURDERER

Charles Jackson, Wanted in Somerset, Ky., Apprehended in This City.

Charles Jackson (colored), who is wanted in Somerset, Ky., for murder, was arrested last evening by Detectives Crawford, Trussand Carey, and looked up in Central Station, charged with being a fugitive from justice.

The prisoner is accused of shooting William Buzzard, who was working as section hand on the Southern road. The killing occurred last spring, and was the outcome of a quarrel over a game of craps. The prisoner refused to talk. This is said to be the third murder committed by the prisoner. He will be returned to Kentucky tomorrow. []



---

[] Excerpt from "City News." Cincinnati Post, Cincinnati, OH. Monday, October 11, 1886. Page 3. Genealogybank.com.

[October 11, 1886] -


C. S. Jackson, wanted at Somerset, Ky., for the murder of Wm. Buzzard in a game of craps a year ago, was arrested in this city Saturday night, and is being held for the Kentucky authorities. []



---

[] Except from "Notes of Current Events." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. October 12, 1886. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1886-10-12/ed-1/seq-2/

[October 12, 1886] -

Charles Jackson, wanted at Somerset for the murder of William Buzzard, has been captured in Cincinnati. []




------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

[] Excerpt from "Notes of Current Events." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. November 30, 1886. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1886-11-30/ed-1/seq-2/

[November 30, 1886] -


Pinkney White, a negro was arrested in Cincinnati for the murder of George Brown, his room-mate, at Somerset, Ky., in March, 1885. []





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[] "Burned to Death." The Evening Bulletin, Maysville, KY. October 29, 1886. Page 4. Newspapers.com.

Mrs. Pope, Mary Carnes, Lizzie Adams,





---

Col 3. Nov 2, 1886. IJ.

---

Col 3. Nov 30, 1886. IJ.

---

"Murdered and Burned." Nov 27, 1886 Courier Journal.

---

The Hickman Courier
(Hickman, Kentucky)
03 Dec 1886, Fri  • Page 1

ATROCIOUS

Poe





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Notes of Current Events. IJ. April 16, 1886.

Ben Wilson

Dick Baker, James Baker, Daniel Baker, [?] Ferguson




------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon, Rockcastle County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. February 25, 1887. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1887-02-25/ed-1/seq-3/

[February 25, 1887] -

Near Pine Hill, Sunday night, Brownlow Townsend was fatally cut by Charles Childers. The circumstances are about as follows: Townsend and Childers had been paying attention to the same young lady a short distance from Pine Hill. Sunday evening they both went to see her but neither remained long. Toward night they returned under the influence of whisky and staid at the young lady's house until about an hour after dark, when they left in the company of another young man. After going a short distance towards the station a difficulty came up between Townsend and Childers, over their sweetheart, in which rocks and sticks were freely used. Knives were drawn and they began slashing at each other, when Townsend received a thrust in the thigh from which he died within fifteen minutes.  After the cutting Childers fled to the fields and laid in the fodder stack all night. He came to town Monday morning, surrendered himself and was sent to jail. His examining trial was set for Wednesday. Childers' age is about nineteen and that of his victim eighteen. Childers says he don't know who struck the first blow, both being drunk. []




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[] Excerpt from "Notes of Current Events." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. March 15, 1887. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1887-03-15/ed-1/seq-2/

[March 15, 1887] -

Charles Phelps and Jack Howell are the last two Pulaskians to fight to the death over an old grudge. When they met Phelps placed his knife against Howell's breast and remarked: "I've a notion to cut your heart out." How placed his knife against Phelp's throat and coolly replied, "Cut away." Phelps did cut away, but unfortunately for him his knife blade broke off at the second thrust. Howell cut Phelps' throat almost from ear to ear. []




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[] Excerpt from "News and Comment." The Courier-Journal, Louisville, KY. March 29, 1887. Page 1. Newspapers.com.

[March 29, 1887] -

At Mt. Vernon, Ky., yesterday, Willie Levisay and Willette Vowels, boys aged respectively fourteen and ten years, quarreled in a grocery store and going outside to fight it out, Vowels stabbed Levisay near the heart, killing him almost instantly. []




---

[] "The Mt. Vernon Boy Murder." The Courier-Journal, Louisville, KY. March 30, 1887. Page 1. Newspapers.com.

[March 30, 1887] -


The Mt. Vernon Boy Murder.

MT. VERNON, KY., March 29. -- [Special.] -- The stabbing of young Livesay by Will Vowels last night is all the topic here to-day. The funeral will take place this afternoon at 3 o'clock. There is no hard feelings between the families of the parties. All recognize the fact that it was a very unfortunate affair, and that it is equally hard upon the families of both parties. Vowels was arrested last night shortly after the killing by Marshal Tom Proctor and turned over to the County Judge, who placed him in the custody of the Jailer. The examining trial is set for tomorrow, the 30th. On account of the youth of Vowels it is presumed that he will not be vigorously prosecuted. Vowels is eleven years old and Livesay was fourteen. []




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[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 24, 1887. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1887-05-24/ed-1/seq-3/

[May 24, 1887] -

Two of the seven murder cases to be tried in London this court have been disposed of, John Hurley getting five years and Charles Luker a like sentence. []



---

[] Excerpt from "London, Laurel County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 31, 1887. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1887-05-31/ed-1/seq-1/

[May 31, 1887] -


Charles Luker was tried the following week for murder, the victim being Isaac Nelson, and given seven years for "recklessly, wantonly and carelessly firing his pistol at a charivari." []




---

[] Excerpt from "London, Laurel County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. June 7, 1887. Page 6. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1887-06-07/ed-1/seq-6/

[June 7, 1887] -


Bills of exceptions in both the Luker (seven years) and Dizney (life sentence) cases have been filed and will go to the Court of Appeals. []




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[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 24, 1887. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1887-05-24/ed-1/seq-3/

[May 24, 1887] -

Two of the seven murder cases to be tried in London this court have been disposed of, John Hurley getting five years and Charles Luker a like sentence. []



---

[] Excerpt from "London, Laurel County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 31, 1887. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1887-05-31/ed-1/seq-1/

[May 31, 1887] -


The first week, John Hurley, for the murder of Isaac Hyde, was tried and found guilty of manslaughter and assessed five years in the pen. []




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[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 24, 1887. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1887-05-24/ed-1/seq-3/

[May 24, 1887] -

The Wayne circuit court only sent one man to the penitentiary, Eliheu McDonald, for killing Bell, two years. William Sloan, for killing Shelby Gregory, was acquitted. The latter was defended by Messrs. R. C. Warren and M. C. Saufley. []




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Excerpt from "News Condensed." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. April 6, 1888. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1888-04-06/ed-1/seq-2/

[April 6, 1888] -


Mrs. Mary and Eliza Jasper fired on a negro trying to break into their house, on Fishing Creek, in Pulaski, and brought down Henry Dick, a notorious negro of that section. []




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[] Excerpt from "Danville, Boyle County." Semi-weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. April 13, 1888. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1888-04-13/ed-1/seq-2/

[April 13, 1888] -

The portion of human remains found on McClenden's ridge, in Pulaski county, turns out to be what is left of two peddlers, whom the Hill brothers and their housekeeper murdered and cut up for hog food. The woman has made a confession and says that the men got $200. []



---

[] Excerpt from "." Semi-weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. April 24, 1888. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1888-04-24/ed-1/seq-2/

[April 24, 1888] -

The story about pieces of the dead bodies of two men being found in Pulaski and the subsequent confession of Mrs. Smith, who said she helped John and Henry Hill kill the two Burton boys for their money, turns out to be false all around, by the appearance of the two boys at the examining trial and unmistakable proof that the pieces of flesh came from a dead sheep. []




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not on timeline. not a killing, need to move to non-fatal 1880s list

[] Excerpt from "Local Lore." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. April 24, 1888. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1888-04-24/ed-1/seq-3/

[April 24, 1888] -

SHOOTING. -- About 8 o'clock Sunday night three pistol shots were heard and upon investigation it was found that John Cook had shot Andy Yates, another negro, in the arm, breaking it, and in the left breast, the latter a glancing shot, which did no damage, further than to pass through the clothing. Marshal Carpenter arrested both, but Cook gave bail and did not go with his enemy to jail. Cook keeps store on Depot street and Andy came in and raised a row. He was ordered out, but soon returned, when Cook told him not to enter. He tried to do so and Cook let go at him with the above result. Andy only got in one shot before his arm was broken. Cook is a well-behaved man and stands high with his race. Yates has been in many a row and a stay in jail is by no means a new experience with him. Examining trial to-day. []


---

[] Excerpt from "Our Neighbors." Kentucky Advocate, Danville, KY. May 4, 1888. Page 3. Newspapers.com.

[May 4, 1888] -

LINCOLN -- An attempt to break jail was discovered by Jailer Owens this week, before the work had proceeded far, and frustrated ... John Cook was acquitted on the grounds of self defense for shooting Andy Yates, who was also acquitted because he did nothing further than to go into Cook's house after he had ordered him not to ... The negro, Cas Inman, who killed Cy Singleton at Kingsville, a year or two ago, has been arrested in Alabama and Deputy Sheriff J. M. Johnson has gone after him. []



-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

not on timeline

[] Excerpt from "Our Neighbors." Kentucky Advocate, Danville, KY. May 4, 1888. Page 3. Newspapers.com.

[May 4, 1888] -

LINCOLN -- An attempt to break jail was discovered by Jailer Owens this week, before the work had proceeded far, and frustrated ... John Cook was acquitted on the grounds of self defense for shooting Andy Yates, who was also acquitted because he did nothing further than to go into Cook's house after he had ordered him not to ... The negro, Cas Inman, who killed Cy Singleton at Kingsville, a year or two ago, has been arrested in Alabama and Deputy Sheriff J. M. Johnson has gone after him. []




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not on timeline

[] Excerpt from "Local Lore." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. June 26, 1888. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1888-06-26/ed-1/seq-3/

[June 26, 1888] -

KILLING. -- A man named Shumate, from Bardstown, shot and killed another named McCarty, at Sinks, in Rockcastle county, Friday. We depended on our Mt. Vernon man to give particulars, but his letter failed to come. []




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[] "Murdered In the Road." The Courier Journal, Louisville, KY. September 16, 1888. Page 7. Newspapers.com.

[September 16, 1888] -

Murdered In the Road.

Mt. Vernon, Ky., Sept. 15. -- (Special.) -- This afternoon, between Brodhead and his home, Allen Haggard was found in the road murdered. Indications point to the murdered man's son-in-law, J. E. Powell, as the assassin, as they had been at outs for some time, over the fact of Powell's wife having made application for divorce, charging her husband with inhuman treatment. The parties had been carrying guns for each other for some time. No arrests. []



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[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon, Rockcastle County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. September 18, 1888. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1888-09-18/ed-1/seq-1/

[September 18, 1888] -



Saturday afternoon, between Brodhead and his home, Allen Hagard was found in the road murdered. Indications point to the murdered man's son-in-law, J. E. Powell, as the assassin, as they had been at outs for sometime over the fact of Powell's wife having made application for divorce, charging her husband with inhuman treatment. The parties had been carrying guns for each other for sometime. No arrest. []


---

[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon, Rockcastle County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. December 7, 1888. Page 1. LOC.

[December 7, 1888] -

The Widow Haggard is making an effort to have the governor offer a reward for the arrest of Powell, the murderer of her husband. []



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[] Excerpt from "." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. December 7, 1888. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1888-12-07/ed-1/seq-3/

[] Excerpt from Column 2. Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. December 11, 1888. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1888-12-11/ed-1/seq-3/


Tom Harper, West Hansford, Lincoln


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One Killed, One Injured In Gunfight On Train, Laurel, 1889

[] "Should Have Given Stringer One." Elkhart Daily Review, Elkhart, IN. January 25, 1889. Page 1. Genealogybank.com.

[January 25, 1889] -


SHOULD HAVE GIVEN STRINGER ONE.

A Brakeman Does Good Shooting, but Not Quite Good Enough.

STANFORD, Ky., Jan. 25. -- Wednesday evening, as Conductor O'Mally's south-bound freight train was passing Pittsburg [Ky.], just above here, James Raines, a brakeman, was fired upon by two desperadoes, Tom Stringer and Sam Graggs. Raines returned the fire, both balls taking effect upon Graggs, one through the heart and the other in the temple, killing him instantly. Raines then started toward the caboose, when Stringer fired at him, striking Raines in the hip. Raines was brought to this place and is in a serious condition. Considerable excitement prevails, as it is reported that a number of Graggs' friends are expected here, who will attempt to take Raines. He is at his father's home, and is guarded by a score of resolute railroad men, and should the mob make the attempt there will be bloodshed. []



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[] Excerpt from "City and Vicinity." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. January 25, 1889. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1889-01-25/ed-1/seq-3/

[January 25, 1889] -

One Man Killed and Another one Wounded. -- Daniel O'Mally's through freight was switching at Pittsburg Tuesday and two of his brakemen, Joe Prewitt and Jim Raines, were joking each other while they were passing over the box cars attending to their duties, when Tom Stringer and Sam Gragg, two characters noted for their meanness, pretended that they believed Prewitt and Raines intended their jocular remarks for them. After Raines had informed them in a gentlemanly manner that they were talking among themselves about themselves, Stringer, desirous of raising a disturbance, drew his pistol and cursed them and finally commenced shooting at them. Young Raines, who had a pistol in his pocket and who had considerable trouble in getting it out, was unable to defend himself until Stringer had shot a number of times, and Prewitt, who was unarmed, climbed from the box car to the caboose thus leaving Raines to fight the battle alone. A number of shots were fired, one ball from Raines' pistol taking effect in Gragg's shoulder and ranging downward, struck the heart, killing him instantly and one from Stringer hitting Raines in the hip, making a painful wound. Gragg, who was with Stringer, it is thought fired not a single shot and no pistol was found on him when he was picked up from where he fell, but he urged Stringer to continue firing and no doubt would have assisted him had he been armed. Raines was taken to London, where his wound was dressed and afterwards brought to his father's near this place. Stringer has not yet been arrested. When Mr. O'Mally's train returned about 10 o'clock Tuesday night a squad of men with shot guns and Winchester rifles surrounded the depot, intending no doubt to take Raines off and kill him, but the train failed to stop and no further damage was done. The Stringers have declared vengeance on Raines and being of revengeful natures they will no doubt carry out their threats. Gragg, who was killed, lived for many years in this county and made himself notorious by participating in numerous robberies and thefts enacted at and near McKinney, and only a few years ago he with his brother killed a negro, for which he failed to get his just deserts. Stringer is considered a dangerous man, and is related to the Stringer who was a pal of Gragg while he lived in this county. It was rumored that Stringer and other friends of Gragg started to Rowland to take Raines out and hang him, but the report was either untrue or their hearts failed them before their journey's end was reached. []

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[] Excerpt from "News in Brief." The Evening Bulletin, Maysville, KY. February 19, 1889. Page 4. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87060190/1889-02-19/ed-1/seq-4/

[February 19, 1889] -


Henry Worley, charged, with ten other persons, with the murder of Lee Troxtile, at Somerset, Ky., has been arrested. []



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[] Excerpt from "London, Laurel County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 28, 1889. Page 4. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1889-05-28/ed-1/seq-4/

[May 28, 1889] -

Tom Hansford, three other men and a cyprian named Lizzie Tucker, were tried for the murder of John Hardick, who was found dead by the railroad near East Bernstadt 2 months ago. The jury failed to agree until 9 o'clock Sunday morning, when a verdict of not guilty was rendered. Hansford was held for false swearing in the case, and he is also under bond for robbing the depot last winter. The young man will probably get there yet. []




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[] Excerpt from "News Condensed." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. July 26, 1889. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1889-07-26/ed-1/seq-2/

[July 26, 1889] -


Wm. Baugh and Green Flynn, at Faubush, Pulaski, were wrestling, when Baugh's brother struck Flynn on the head with a hand spike, crushing the skull. Drs. Warren and Perkins removed the skull and found that death resulted from concussion of the brain. []




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[] Excerpt from Column 1. The Courier Journal, Louisville, KY. July 26, 1889. Page 2. Newspapers.com.

[July 26, 1889] -


Tuesday was a good day for killing in Kentucky. John Rose was assassinated from ambush in Powell county. Evan S. Warren was killed by three negroes at Danville. Wm. Baugh murdered Green Flynn near Somerset with a handspike and Miss Mary Gilders, the victim of a seducer, committed suicide near the same place. []









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[] Excerpt from "City and Vicinity." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. July 26, 1889. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1889-07-26/ed-1/seq-3/

[July 26, 1889] -

MURDERED. -- Mr. Evan S. Warren, who was a brother of Hon R. C. Warren, was shot by a negro named Beatty Wickliffe at the Danville depot, Monday afternoon and died that night at 10:30. He and the negro had had a difficulty in the morning when the latter remarked that he would see him again. He was as good as his word as the following dying declaration of Mr. Warrens hows:

A half hour before his death he made substantially the following statement: 'I believe that I am going to die. The circumstances attending the shooting are as follows: I went to the debot in the omnibus, got out and went into the ladies' waiting room. As I came out Beatty Wickliffe came out of the men's waiting room and followed me to the south end of the platform, glaring at me, and with his right hand in his pocket. As he came up to me he began drawing his pistol. I fired at him and he ran. Just as I fired, Bob Mayho and Flem Murphy, both colored, seized me, one by each arm and wrist, and while they were still holding me Wickliffe, who had run away out of sight, came back, and coming close to me shot me several times."

The murder has caused much excitement in Danville and there is a question as to whether the negroes were holding Mr. Warren as peacemakers or accomplices. They had not been arrested at last accounts, the authorities preferring to await the result of the examining trial. Mr. Warren was a warm-hearted, whole-souled man and leaves many friends, who sincerely regret his untimely taking off. He was conscious nearly up to the last and in response to his brother Dick's question, said he would like to talk with Rev. Dr. Green. He was sent for and after praying with and for him, had a very satisfactory talk on spiritual matters. The funeral occurred Wednesday at Danville, after a service by Dr. Green, and was largely attended. The family, and especially Mr. R. C. Warren, whose engagements must be irksome to him under the circumstances, have the hearty sympathy of everybody. []



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[] Excerpt from "London, Laurel County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. July 30, 1889. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1889-07-30/ed-1/seq-1/

[July 30, 1889] -

It is now believed that the man Jones, who was run over by the cars at Barbourville last Sunday night, was murdered and placed on the track, as a club with considerable blood on it was found near by. []




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[] Excerpt from "News Condensed." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. August 27, 1889. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1889-08-27/ed-1/seq-2/

[August 27, 1889] -

Henry Goodman plunged a knife to the hilt into the breast of D. J. Sharp in a magistrate's court in Pulaski, when he made at a sister of Goodman who had called him a liar. Sharp expired immediately. []




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6th col says this is not somerset ? (buckeyetown = buckeye, garrard ???)

[] Excerpt from "The Commonwealth." The Hickman Courier, Hickman, KY. Septemer 6, 1889. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052141/1889-09-06/ed-1/seq-1/

[September 6, 1889] -


D. J. Sharp was stabbed to death at Buckeyetown by Henry Goodman, with whose sister Sharp had quarrelled. []





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Pulaski. 1890. not on timeline

[] "Settling Old Scores." The Courier Journal, Louisville, KY. August 6, 1890. Page 5. Newspapers.com.

[August 6, 1890] -


SETTLING OLD SCORES.

Grudges Revived By Enemies and Settled in Mortal Combat.

Two Officers and Three Citizens in a Deadly Encounter at Burnside.

All of the Participants Badly Injured, Two of Whom Will die.

Somerset, Ky., Aug. 5. -- (Special.)--A very serious riot occurred at Burnside late last evening between the Police Judge and Town Marshal on one side and Ben Chestnut and his two sons, John and Hiram, on the other, which resulted in the fatal wounding of two of the participants, and the serious and probably fatal wounding of the other three. An old feud has existed between P. F. Smith and Ben Chestnut for some time. Smith was recently elected Police Judge of Burnside, and Chestnut declared to some friends that he would never permit any one to arrest him under a warrant issued by Smith. Chestnut, who lives on the north side of Cumberland river and votes at the Somerset precinct, attended the election here yesterday, but went home late in the evening and went over to see the progress of the election at the Burnside voting place. His son John, who accompanied him, became boisterous and was arrested by John Coomer, the Town Marshal, and gave bond. Ben Chestnut hearing of this caused the bondsmen to surrender John to the officers, who proceeded to take him to the lock-up. Ben Chestnut and Hiram attacked the officers and demanded John's release. A fight ensued, in which Judge Smith was fatally stabbed, all of the Chestnuts were shot. John's wound is necessarily fatal, a ball passing through the abdomen. The other two also received serious pistol shots in the arms and body. Coomer received sever severe gashes with a knife. All the participants, who are not dead or dying, are confined to their beds and no arrests have been made. Great excitement prevails at Burnside. It is feared that this is only the beginning of more serious trouble, as both parties have many friends. []


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[] Excerpt from Column 4. Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. August 8, 1890. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1890-08-08/ed-1/seq-1/

[August 8, 1890] -

A dispatch from Burnside says there was a fight between the police judge and town marshal on one side and Ben Chestnut and his two sons, John and Hiram, on the other. There was an old feud between P. F. Smith, the police judge, and Ben Chestnut. Chestnut said when Smith was elected that he would never submit to arrest under warrant from him. Monday Jno. Chestnut was arrested and gave bond. His father caused his bondsmen to surrender him and then with his son, Hiram, started to take John away from Marshal Coomer and Judge Smith. In the fight that followed John Chestnut and Judge Smith received several wounds, but Smith is not dangerously hurt. The Chestnuts have long persecuted Smith in very cowardly ways, such as shooting at his house at night, wounding his stock, &c. []



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[] Excerpt from "News Condensed." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. August 26, 1890. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1890-08-26/ed-1/seq-2/

[August 26, 1890] -

P. F. Smith, police judge, and John Coomer, marshal of Burnside, were tried before Judge Denton, charged with killing John Chestnut at Burnside election day, and acquitted on the grounds of self defense. The Burnside reporter of the Republican says that the decision gives general satisfaction. []




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[] Excerpt from "Sparks From The Wire." The Evening Bulletin, Maysville, KY. September 1, 1890. Page 4. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87060190/1890-09-01/ed-1/seq-4/

[September 1, 1890] -


Andy Bowman, wanted at Somerset, Ky., for murder, was arrested at Birmingham, Ala., Saturday. It is said he has killed three men. He was heavily armed when captured. []




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1890?

[] "Captured After 12 Years." The Paducah Sun, Paducah, KY. July 30, 1903. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052116/1903-07-30/ed-1/seq-1/

[July 30, 1903] -

CAPTURED AFTER 12 YEARS

Somerset, Ky., July 30 -- Richard Taylor, charged with the murder of Clay Haynes, and who has been a fugitive for 12 years, was arrested at Stearns and lodged in jail here. Taylor was 14 years of age, and had been mistreated by Haynes. Taylor afterwards met Haynes and, it is alleged, told him that he was going to kill him, and that he had better say his prayers at the same time drawing a pistol. After Haynes had finished praying he shot him to death. He then fled the county and has been in Mexico ever since. []




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[] Excerpt from "City and Vicinity." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. January 13, 1891. Page 3. LOC.

[January 13, 1891] -

KILLED HER SON. -- Jane Mullins, colored, shot her son Henry through the lungs Sunday night, killing him instantly. The parties lived in Crab Orchard and there are conflicting reports of the murder. One is that it was a deliberate and premeditated deed, the other that it was accidental and happened during a scuffle for the weapon. The woman has since made herself scarce. []





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[] Excerpt from "City and Vicinity." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 1, 1891. Page 5. LOC. 

[May 1, 1891] -

FATALLY SHOT. -- In a difficulty at Kingsville this week John Wesley Gooch was shot in the right side by a fellow named Lasley from Pulaski, the ball going clear through him. The origin of the difficulty is rather obscure. Mr. Gooch, it will be remembered, killed Constable Killion at Highland 10 years ago, but was acquitted on the ground that he acted under a misapprehension of the part Mr. Killion took in a fight he was having with another man. []





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[] Excerpt from "London, Laurel County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 29, 1891. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1891-05-29/ed-1/seq-1/

[May 29, 1891] -

At this writing Ben Martin's case for killing Tom Hodge is before the court and will be tried, both sides being ready. []



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[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon, Rockcastle County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. August 7, 1891. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1891-08-07/ed-1/seq-3/

[August 7, 1891] -

The only trouble in the county on election day was at Crooked Creek precinct where John D. Mullins met his death at the hands of Bill Damerel. It appears that Damerel was drunk and had been noisy around the polls and was displaying his money. Young Mullins, the sheriff of the election, spoke to Damerel and requested him to settle an old debt due Mullins, whereupon Damerel flew into a passion and replied that he would whip out the amount with Mullins. Later when Damerel was flourishing a pistol and making a noise around the polls, Mullins asked him to be quiet. Damerel replied that he would "burn it off in his face." Damerel was persuaded to leave, but before starting away it is said he remarked that he would kill some one before he left the place. He with Jones Durham went to where their horses were hitched and after mounting both began firing their pistols. After the fifth shot young Mullins, who was sitting inside the house where the voting was going on, leaning his head over on one hand was seen to fail from his chair a corpse. Damerel and Durham put spurs to their horses and fled. Several parties pursued them, but others on foot cut across a mountain and headed them off and captured them, bringing them on here to jail that night. Mullins was shot in the center of the nose, the ball passing to the back of the neck and ranged downward, producing instant death. Witnesses say that Durham pointed his pistol downward when he was shooting, and that Damerel took deliberate aim at his victim. Damerel says that he don't know that he shot Mullins, but that if he did it was accidental. The examination trial is set for Friday, when it is thought Durham will be released. Considerable feeling exists int he whole eastern portion of the county over the tragic death of young Mullins, as he was a very popular man and highly esteemed by everyone and a useful citizen. Damerel is not a native of the county but is from East Tennessee, and has been here but a few years. []


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[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon, Rockcastle County." Semi-weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY.   September 13, 1892. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1892-09-13/ed-1/seq-1/

[September 13, 1892] -

The testimony and speeches were finished Saturday at noon in the Dameron case and was then given to the jury, which returned a verdict after five hours consultation, finding the defendant guilty of voluntary manslaughter and fixing his punishment at two years in the "pen." []



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[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon, Rockcastle County." Semi-weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY.  September 23, 1892. Page 5. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1892-09-23/ed-1/seq-5/

[September 23, 1892] -

Bill Damerel, who got two years at last term of court, was taken to Frankfort last Thursday. Fain, who was given 17 years for killing Jesse Hilton, has taken an appeal. []



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[] Excerpt from "London, Laurel County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. August 25, 1891. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1891-08-25/ed-1/seq-2/

[August 25, 1891] -

There was a shooting scrape at Pittsburg Saturday night between Deputy Town-Marshal George Gragg and Bill Miller, of that place, in which Miller was slightly wounded in three places. Particulars could not be obtained. []




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[] Excerpt from "London, Laurel County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. August 28, 1891. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1891-08-28/ed-1/seq-1/

[August 28, 1891] -

Bill Miller, who was shot by Geo. Gragg Saturday night at Pittsburg, died Monday morning. The wounds were supposed to be slight at the time of the shooting. []




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[] Excerpt from "City and Vicinity." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 24, 1892. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1892-05-24/ed-1/seq-3/

[May 24, 1892] -

George Gragg, formerly of this county, was lodged in jail here Sunday by Sheriff Moren, of Laurel, for safe keeping. He is charged with murder, committed about eight months ago, and since then has been under bail of $3,000. His bondsmen surrendered him at the present term of the circuit court and the case not being ready for trial, he will probably lay in jail here till the fall term. It is suspicioned that the reason he was surrendered was that Gragg hoped to be placed in the London jail from which he could be easily released by his Jellico friends. []




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[] Excerpt from "London, Laurel County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. October 10, 1893. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1893-10-10/ed-1/seq-1/

[October 10, 1893] -

George Gragg, for killing Wm. Miller at Pittsburg, was given 21 years. Gragg was deputy town marshal at the time of the killing. []






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[] Excerpt from "News of the Vicinage." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. April 12, 1898. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1898-04-12/ed-1/seq-1/

[April 12, 1898] -

Hamp Gragg, a brother of Craig and George Gragg, who were sent to the penitentiary from Laurel for murder, shot and seriously wounded James Ellison at Pittsburg, and is now in jail at London. []




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[] Excerpt from "City and Vicinity." Semi-weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. September 22, 1891. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1891-09-22/ed-1/seq-3/

[September 22, 1891] -

If the reports, which come from Somerset about the killing of Engineer John White of the C. S., by John Catron, a saloon keeper, be true, Judge Lynch might with much propriety resume his operations there. With no apparent provocation whatever, he struck his victim with a stick, knocking him down, and drawing a pistol, shot him as he lay on the floor. The only excuse given for the crime is that Catron was drunk. []



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[] "Brutally Murdered." The Crittenden Press, Marion, KY. September 24, 1891. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86069457/1891-09-24/ed-1/seq-1/
2nd col

[September 24, 1891] -

BRUTALLY MURDERED.

A Cincinnati Southern Engineer Shot to Death by a Saloon Keeper.

LEXINGTON, Ky., Sept. 21.-- Another brutal murder was committed in Somerset Friday morning, about 1 o'clock. At that hour John White, a well known and highly respected engineer on the second division of the Cincinnati Southern railroad, entered a grocery store in Somerset to pay a bill of $5.15 that he owed the proprietor. In the store was John Catron, a saloon keeper, of Somerset, who was drunk. He made some insulting remark to White, who resented the same. He then picked up a stick, and struck White a terrible blow, felling him to the floor. He then drew his pistol, and while the unfortunate man was on the floor, shot him three times, producing fatal wounds, from which he died three hours afterwards. White leaves a wife and children, who live in Ohio. []


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[] Excerpt from "City and Vicinity." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. September 25, 1891. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1891-09-25/ed-1/seq-3/

[September 25, 1891] -

A dispatch to the Courier-Journal from Crab Orchard says: Two neighboring youths, Frank Bastin and Joe Henry, aged respectively 12 and 19, while on their way to church at Highland became involved in a quarrel as to which should have the empty pint bottle which they had just drained of its liquor, and Bastin drew his pocket-knife and plunged it up to the handle in his companion's side. Henry, it is thought, will die. []





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[] "Acted in Self-Defense." The Courier Journal, Louisville, KY. December 11, 1891. Page 1. Newspapers.com.

[December 11, 1891] -


Acted in Self-Defense.

Somerset, Ky., Dec. 10. -- (Special.) -- Thos. Candler, of this place, was given a preliminary hearing to-day in Judge Denton's court for the killing, last month, of J. P. Brewer, in a saloon fight. After examining thirty witnesses, the court released Candler, as he was justified in his act. []



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Lincoln county? not on timeline

[] Excerpt from "City and Vicinity." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. February 16, 1892. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1892-02-16/ed-1/seq-3/

[February 16, 1892] -

The killing of Joe Goode by Green Gentry in Anderson Carr's bar-room, making the second person to be killed there, has raised the question as to whether he is keeping a proper house under his license. An effort was made to have the council recind his license at its last meeting, but it was decided that the proper method of procedure against him was before the county judge on complaint of citizens. Accordingly a warrant was issued returnable before Judge Varnon next Thursday, when proof will be heard on the question of revoking Carr's license. The fact that the killing occurred in his saloon is not of itself proof that he is keeping a disorderly house and that alone is not sufficient to convict him, since it might have occurred anywhere, but it is said that additional proof will be brought forward to sustain the charge. In this connection it would be well also to investigate the other saloons in town. We are told that liquors can be obtained from them  at any time Sunday through private entrances and that there is complaint against them for selling to inebriates, which is expressly forbidden under the law. Let there be a searching investigation and let no one be spared because of race or other reasons. If the saloon men want to have the license law continued, it will stand them in hand to live squarely up to the bonds that they have given. They can do more to make that law odious than all other agencies combined. The law and order men who are not prohibitionists, will be forced to change their opinions as to license, if the safeguards are continually and openly violated. []



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[] Excerpt from "London, Laurel County."  Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. February 26, 1892. Page 7. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1892-02-26/ed-1/seq-7/

[February 26, 1892] -

The notorious Craig Gragg is again in jail. He cut a passenger on the train, Sunday evening, near Pittsburg, and he received a flesh wound in the hip from a pistol. The man cut on the train was named Garrard Thompson. Gragg was out on bond for burglary and this episode caused them to give him up. []




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[] Excerpt from "London, Laurel County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. April 19, 1892. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1892-04-19/ed-1/seq-1/

[April 19, 1892] -

Detective Anderson, of Somerset, arrived here Sunday evening with the notorious Craig Gragg, who has several times escaped from the jail here. He told the writer he did not expect to be in jail longer than a week this time at the fartherest. []





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[] Excerpt from "London, Laurel County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 6, 1892. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1892-05-06/ed-1/seq-1/

[May 6, 1892] -

Five prisoners, led by the notorious Craig Gragg, escaped from the London jail Monday night by prizing out a cross bar of the cage. The following are the names of the parties: Craig Gragg, for robbing the Pittsburgh depot; Enoch Boone, for seducing a girl under 16; Wm. Osby, carrying a pistol; John Parrot and Larkin Cress for selling liquor. Cy Ping, in for selling liquor, got out at the same holes Tuesday night while Jailer Lovell was out hunting the other prisoners. They had smuggled in a crow-bar about 5 1/2 feet long with which they did their work and which they took with them. Craig Gragg is as hard to catch and harder to hold than a flea. []





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[] Excerpt from "London, Laurel County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 10, 1892. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1892-05-10/ed-1/seq-1/

[May 10, 1892] -

John Warren was arrested and put in jail last Wednesday, charged with stealing a mule and two hams from some parties near Pittsburgh, and was caught with both in his possession. It is thought he had no intention of keeping the mule, but had taken it to carry the hams home as he lived near. Friday he succeeded in picking a lock in the corridor, next to the sleeping cell that Craig Gragg and others got out of and escaped through the same holes. Dick Harbin and Rowan Hardin gave him a foot race, while Simp Stanifer, who had a horse hitched convenient, also gave him a chase and the trio succeeded in capturing him before he got to the top of cemetery hill and he has since been confined in a sleeping cell. It has been several days since the jail was broken open, and yet the bars have not been mended and even the bricks on the outside wall have not been put in. Both the jailer and the county judge are personal friends of the writer, but that don't keep me from saying that it shows a most willful neglect of duty in not making these necessary repairs. []


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[] Excerpt from "City and Vicinity." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. June 7, 1892. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1892-06-07/ed-1/seq-3/

[June 7, 1892] -

Another Gragg has been placed in jail to keep the other one's company. Craig Gragg was delivered to Jailer Owens Friday night by Sheriff Moren, of Laurel, charged with robbing the depot at London and malicious wounding. Gragg was originally from this [Lincoln] county and his character does not seem to have improved since he left it, when it was bad enough. He has broken out of the London jail, or been let out, four times. []






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[] Excerpt from "London, Laurel County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. December 9, 1892. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1892-12-09/ed-1/seq-1/

[December 9, 1892] -

That bad Craig Gragg was sent to the penitentiary for one year at the late circuit court for house breaking. []



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[] Excerpt from "London, Laurel County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. December 5, 1893. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1893-12-05/ed-1/seq-1/

[December 5, 1893] -

Craig Gragg, who about two months ago returned from a two-years imprisonment in the penitentiary at Frankfort for manslaughter, was shot and mortally wounded in a saloon near Pittsburg by James Smallwood. He was shot in the bowels and died next morning. []




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[] Excerpt from "London, Laurel County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. December 12, 1893. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1893-12-12/ed-1/seq-1/

[December 12, 1893] -

Craig Gragg is not dead by a great big lots. Although there is a bullet hole clear through his body, he was on the streets of Pittsburg Saturday. When a doctor told him he was certain to die, he replied with the assertion that he "was not going to do any such a blank, blank thing." []




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[] Excerpt from "City and Vicinity." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. October 9, 1896. Page 5. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1896-10-09/ed-1/seq-5/

[October 9, 1896] -

FOR TRIAL. -- Deputy Sheriff L. B. McHargue and Deputy Jailer E. W. Moren, of London, came down Wednesday and took back with them for trial Craig and Joe Gragg, who have been in jail here for safe-keeping for 117 days. The former is charged with robbery and the latter with seduction. []





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[] Excerpt from "News of the Vicinage." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. April 12, 1898. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1898-04-12/ed-1/seq-1/

[April 12, 1898] -

Hamp Gragg, a brother of Craig and George Gragg, who were sent to the penitentiary from Laurel for murder, shot and seriously wounded James Ellison at Pittsburg, and is now in jail at London. []




---

[] Excerpt from Column 3. Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. June 6, 1899. Page 4. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1899-06-06/ed-1/seq-4/

[June 6, 1899] -

A dispatch from London says that Mrs. Frances Gragg, offers $25 to any man who will arrest her husband, Craig Gragg, a noted criminal. He beat her up and ran away from their home, at Pittsburg. Marshal E. B. Moren and his friend, John Harkleroad, tried to earn the $25, but Gragg got the drop on them with a 45-caliber Colt and made them hunt the high brush. The woman met Gragg while she was visiting the jail one day and fell in love with him. She put up $600 cash as a bond and married him. []





---

[] Excerpt from "News of the Vicinage." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. June 9, 1899. Page 1. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1899-06-09/ed-1/seq-1/

[June 9, 1899] -

Deputy Marshall G. C. Thompson has captured Craig Gragg, wanted in London, on felony charges. Gragg has served two terms, is desperate and showed fight. If convicted he will go to the penitentiary for life. []





---

[] Excerpt from "News of the Vicinage." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. July 11, 1899. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1899-07-11/ed-1/seq-1/

[July 11, 1899] -

Craig Gragg was captured by a sheriff's posse in Laurel. He cut one or two men. []



---

[] "A Bad Man." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. July 18, 1899. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1899-07-18/ed-1/seq-3/

[July 18, 1899] -

A BAD MAN. -- A dispatch from London says Craig Gragg was tried there Friday on several charges. His wife testified against him, told a pitiful story of mistreatment by her husband, and exhibited fearful bruises and wounds on her body that Gragg inflicted two weeks ago. Robert Ridings showed the court ugly gashes in the breast, inflicted by Gragg with a dirk. He testified he didn't know Gragg was mad at him until he was cut. The court held him on various bonds, one for $2,000, to keep the peace. He can't provide bond, and will be sent to Stanford for safe-keeping till the October court.

He was brought here by Sheriff Lee McHargue Sunday and turned over to Jailer DeBord. Gragg is a pretty bad man, judging from his record. It is said that he has served two terms in the penitentiary and the mittimus states that he is held for cutting and wounding with intent to kill for which he is yet to be indicted, that he is already under indictment for housebreaking, for malicious shooting and wounding with intent to kill and for false swearing. There is hardly a doubt that he will go up on one or the other of the charges and then he will cease from troubling. A third sentence to the penitentiary carries a life term with it. Our readers will remember that while he was in jail at London a few months ago, the woman, who now testifies against him, fell in love with him and not only married him but bailed him out of prison. He has led her a merry dance since, though there are those mean enough to say she deserves all the trouble she brought on herself. []




---

[] "Five Prisoners Paroled." Lexington Herald, Lexington, KY. August 23, 1925. Page 6. Genealogybank.com.

[August 23, 1925] -

FIVE PRISONERS PAROLED

Given Leave by State Board of Charities and Corrections

[Special to The Herald]

FRANKFORT, Ky., Aug. 22. -- Five reformatory prisoners were paroled today by the state board of charities and corrections, as follows:

John Abbott, of Wayne county, housebreaking, three years, February 1924; Robert Fugate, of Mason county, attempted rape, five to 20 years; October 1913; Craig Gragg, of Whitley county, detaining a female, and previous conviction, life, November 1907; John S. Hall, of Pike county, forgery, four years, June 1923; and W. E. Hawthorne, of Fayette county, obtaining signature of another by false pretenses, five year, June 1920. []




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murder case?

[] Excerpt from "London, Laurel County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. March 18, 1892. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1892-03-18/ed-1/seq-2/

[March 18, 1892] -

George C. Thompson, who has been confined in jail here since last circuit court awaiting the action of the court of appeals in his case, in which he was sentenced to two years in the penitentiary, has had his case reversed again and will in a few days be a free man again, until next circuit court anyway. There will be no trouble for him to give any amount of bond required. []





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[] "A $3 Murder." The Courier Journal, Louisville, KY. March 26, 1892. Page 2. Newspapers.com.

[March 26, 1892] -


A $3 Murder.

Robert Eldridge, a Butcher, Kills Jesse Davies At Somerset.

A Small Meat Bill Owed By the Victim Causes the Tragedy.

Somerset, Ky., March 25. -- (Special.) -- Jesse Davies was shot and killed by Robert Eldridge, a butcher in the store of B. V. Grinstead, at 5:30 o'clock this afternoon. Eldridge walked in and bought a plug of tobacco. He met Davies near the front and they began to quarrel. Suddenly Eldridge drew a pistol and fired four times at Davies, who fell to the floor, where he died almost immediately.

Three of the four shots struck him, one in the wrist, one in the temple, and the last, which was fired after he fell, penetrated to the heart. Doctors Perkins and Owens were called, but when they arrived Davies was dead. Davies and Eldridge have had trouble over a meat bill of $3, and it was that which caused the killing. Davies had no regular employment, but worked at odd jobs. He was shiftless, but not of a quarrelsome disposition.

The victim was thirty years of age and the son of D. A. Davies, a prominent pension attorney of this place. He leaves a wife and four small children in poor circumstances. Eldridge is a son-in-law of his business partner, John Babbitt, and has only resided at this place about six months, having come from the Flat Lick country, nine miles east of this place. Eldridge has been looked upon as a hot tempered, dangerous man, but this is the first trouble he has ever been connected with. He is about thirty years of age, is married and has two small children. []



---

[] "Jesse Davis Killed." Cincinnati Post, Cincinnati, OH. March 26, 1892. Page 8. Genealogybank.com.

[March 26, 1892] -

Jesse Davis Killed.

SOMERSET, Ky., March 26, -- [Special.] -- Last night Robert Eldridge shot and killed Jesse Davis, son of a well-known pension attorney. Davis was shot in the arm, temple and heart. The trouble occurred in Eldridge's butcher shop over a bill of $8 which Davis owed for meat. After the shooting Eldridge surrendered. []


---

[] "Somerset's Last Tragedy." The Courier Journal, Louisville, KY. March 27, 1892. Page 4. Newspapers.com.

[March 27, 1892] -


SOMERSET'S LAST TRAGEDY.

A Coroner's Jury Views the Body of Jesse Davies--The Jail Guarded.

Somerset, Ky., March 26. -- (Special.) -- The Coroner's jury, after viewing the remains Jesse Davies, the victim of yesterday's tragedy, returned a verdict on the statement of Eldridge without hearing the testimony that Davies came to his death by a pistol shot fired by Eldridge. The examination trial was set for 3 o'clock this afternoon on before Mayor James L. Colyer, but was postponed on account of the absence of County Judge George Shadoan until Monday morning at 10 o'clock. Large crowds came to town from Eldridge's old neighborhood, and Chief of Police J. C. Anderson and Sheriff L. Denton put extra officers on duty to guard the jail.

Eldridge came to Somerset from the Gilliland vicinity, and while he has not been immediately connected with their misdeeds still he has sympathy from that quarter. []



---

[] Excerpt from "Newsy Notes." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. April 1, 1892. Page 4. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1892-04-01/ed-1/seq-4/

[April 1, 1892] -

The examining trial of Robert Eldridge, for the killing of Jesse Davies, was held in Somerset, and Eldridge was held over for the grand jury in $1,000 bond. []


---

[] "Indicted for Manslaughter." The Courier Journal, Louisville, KY. April 27, 1892. Page 3. Newspapers.com.

[April 27, 1892] -


Indicted For Manslaughter.

Somerset, Ky., April 26. -- (Special.) -- The grand jury to-day found a true bill against Robert Eldridge for manslaughter. Eldridge shot and killed Jesse Davis at this place May 8, over a dispute about a meat bill. Eldridge's trial is set for Wednesday. []



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[] "A Murderer Brought Back." The Courier Journal, Louisville, KY. June 1, 1892. Page 5. Newspapers.com.

[June 1, 1892] -


A Murderer Brought Back.

Somerset, Ky., May 31. -- (Special.) -- T. R. Griffin, railroad detective for the Cincinnati Southern railroad at this place, arrived here to-day with Yellow Hammer, alias Charles Aklen, one of the most desperate negro characters in this part of Kentucky. Aklen was captured at Kingston, Tenn. He is brought back for the murder of Hiram Taylor, last February, at tunnel, No. 7, a few miles below this place. []


---

[] Excerpt from "Newsy Notes." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. June 3, 1892. Page 4. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1892-06-03/ed-1/seq-4/

[June 3, 1892] -

Charles Atkin, who is wanted at Somerset for the murder of Hiram Taylor, has been arrested in Tennessee and taken back to Somerset. []


---

[] Excerpt from Column 2. Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY.  April 4, 1893. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1893-04-04/ed-1/seq-1/

[April 4, 1893] -

Yellow Hammer Ackles 21 years for the murder of John Taylor by the Somerset court. []




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[] Excerpt from "City and Vicinity." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. June 3, 1892. Page 5. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1892-06-03/ed-1/seq-5/

[June 3, 1892] -

WAIVED. -- West King, who killed Frank Fish at Crab Orchard, waived an examination when his case was called Wednesday and he was held in $1,500 bail to circuit court. Of course he will not be able to give it. The mitigating circumstances are that Fish drew a pistol on him in the afternoon and when King told him he was not armed, said: "Go and arm yourself, I intend to kill you." King went home and got his pistol and returning told Fish he was ready for him, at the same time opening fire. Fish's pistol wouldn't work and King got in his work on the fifth fire. []





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[] "Caused by an Ancient Grudge." Cleveland Leader, Cleveland, OH. October 23, 1892. Page 7. Genealogybank.com.

[October 23, 1892] -

Caused by an Ancient Grudge.

CINCINNATI, October 22. -- An Enquirer special from Somerset, Ky., says that at 10 o'clock this forenoon at Greenwood, Pulaski county, Ky., Jim Patterson and Joe Haines quarreled and resorted at once to firearms. Haines fired the first two shots from his revolver. Both missed Patterson, but one bullet killed a Negro, name unknown, and the other wounded Mr. Weatherford, station agent of the Cincinnati Southern Railway, in the shoulder, but not fatally. Patterson immediately, with one shot from a Winchester rifle, killed Haines and then surrendered to the officers. The result of this is two men killed and one badly wounded. The cause is an ancient grudge. []


---

[] "A Peacemaker Killed." Plaindealer, Detroit, MI. October 28, 1892. Page 1. Genealogybank.com.

[October 28, 1892] -

A Peacemaker Killed.

Somerset, Ky., Oct. 22. -- A shooting affray occurred at Greenwood, twelve miles South of the Cumberland river, and which is a considerable mining town, this morning about 10:00 o'clock. Chas. Haynes and Lucien Patterson have had an old grudge at one another for a long time, and this morning they concluded to shoot it out. Haynes drew his pistol and attempted to shoot Patterson, but an Afro-American named John Jewett tried to part them, when he was shot through and through and killed instantly. The agent, Mr. Weatherford, was also accidentally shot in the breast, but his wound is not necessarily fatal and he will recover. Patterson then shot with a Winchester rifle and instantly killed Haynes. It is said that Patterson acted in self-defense. []



---

[] Excerpt from "Newsy Notes." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. April 24, 1894. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1894-04-24/ed-1/seq-2/

[April 24, 1894] -

Lucien Patterson was given two years at Somerset for the murder of Charles Hines at Greenwood. []




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[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon, Rockcastle County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. September 13, 1892. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1892-09-13/ed-1/seq-1/

[September 13, 1892] -

Mr. Bruce Wilmot died at Brodhead Friday morning from the effects of the gun shot wound received at the hands of Joe Howard. He was buried Saturday by the Masons. He was popular throughout the county and his death is deeply deplored by every one. It was one of the longest funeral processions ever seen hereabouts. []





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accidental?

[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon, Rockcastle County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. November 4, 1892. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1892-11-04/ed-1/seq-2/

[November 4, 1892] -

Monday on Brush creek, this county, Bill Hubbard, while sitting at dinner, was shot and instantly killed. Whether the killing was accidental or not is not known. It is said Dr. Hunly and Tom Bowles were at the house of Hubbard and were drinking and firing off their pistols while sitting out on the porch and a ball from one of their weapons passed through the board partition of the house, striking him in the neck. All are Jackson county men. No arrests. []




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Pulaski

[] Excerpt from "Newsy Notes." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. December 20, 1892. Page 4. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1892-12-20/ed-1/seq-4/

[December 20, 1892] -

Mrs. Eveline Burdine is in jail at Somerset charged with the murder of Joseph Arthur. She claims that Arthur was attempting to gain admittance to her room and that she killed him in self defense. []




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[December 9, 1892] -


[Laurel County] Grand jury returned 92 indictments, 18 of which were for concealed weapons, 36 for liquor, 4 for grand larceny and one for murder -- Patton Whitley for killing Augustus Fogle, a woman, both colored. [1]




---

[April 27, 1894] -


R. C. Scobee, sheriff of Clark county, brought Patton Whitley, colored, here [London] Monday.  He killed his wife at East Bernstadt about two years ago.  Jas. W. Moran took him to the Stanford jail Tuesday for safe keeping, and says he is the toughest customer he has had in his charge for many years. [2]




---

[May 3, 1894] -


A Tough Negro.


On information from London, Laurel county, Sheriff Scobee and Deputy Stokely went out to Rankin station on the K. C. railroad, Sunday evening, and arrested a negro known here as Jack Williams.  His right name is Pate Whitley.  About eighteen months ago he killed a negro woman in Laurel county, and has since been a fugitive from justice.  He had been in this county about a year.  He is a desperate character and was not taken without difficulty.  At first he started to run, and the sheriff and his deputy fired eleven shots at him, one ball striking him in the back of the head and glancing upward.  The negro fired three or four shots in return without effect, and then surrendered.  Sheriff Scobee took him to London Monday. -- Winchester Sun. [3]



---

[May 29, 1894] -

There were 71 indictments returned this court, of this number 19 were for concealed weapons and 14 for selling liquor.  Indictments for murder were made against Alex and Sim Tuttle, for killing young Williams; Pate Whitley, for killing a colored woman a few years ago; Wm. Stott, for killing John Collins at Lily; Robert Jackson, for killing Ed. Chestnut; Eb. Moran, Sam Warnack and C. Godsey, were indicted for manslaughter.  This was for shooting the negro, John Ely, who was trying to make his escape while under arrest.  Wm. Harkleroads, Jr., was indicted for manslaughter for shooting Bob Dees, about a year ago.  Sam Broughton, of near Hazel Patch, was indicted for incest.  The only murder that has been tried this court was against Pate Whitley and he was sent up for 16 years.  This is the only conviction.  Several visiting attorneys are present. [4] 


---

[1] Excerpt from "London, Laurel County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. December 9, 1892. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1892-12-09/ed-1/seq-1/

[2] Excerpt from "London, Laurel County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. April 27, 1894. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1894-04-27/ed-1/seq-1/

[3] "A Tough Negro." Hazel Green Herald, Hazel Green, KY. May 3, 1894. Page 11. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86063242/1894-05-03/ed-1/seq-11/

[4] Excerpt from "London, Laurel County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 29, 1894. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1894-05-29/ed-1/seq-3/

.
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[] Excerpt from "Newsy Notes." Semi-weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. January 27, 1893. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1893-01-27/ed-1/seq-2/

[January 27, 1893] -


Near Somerset, at the Barren Fork coal mines, John and Jim Ledford shot and killed a negro named Luck Sutton. The shooting was the result of a drunken row. []



---

[] Excerpt from "Personal." Daily Public Ledger, Maysville, KY. February 27, 1893. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86069117/1893-02-27/ed-1/seq-1/

[February 27, 1893] -

Governor Brown will pay $100 for the arrest of James and John Ledford, who are charged with murder in Pulaski county. []



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Laurel. 1893.

[] Excerpt from "London, Laurel County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 29, 1894. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1894-05-29/ed-1/seq-3/

[May 29, 1894] -

There were 71 indictments returned this court, of this number 19 were for concealed weapons and 14 for selling liquor.  Indictments for murder were made against Alex and Sim Tuttle, for killing young Williams; Pate Whitley, for killing a colored woman a few years ago; Wm. Stott, for killing John Collins at Lily; Robert Jackson, for killing Ed. Chestnut; Eb. Moran, Sam Warnack and C. Godsey, were indicted for manslaughter.  This was for shooting the negro, John Ely, who was trying to make his escape while under arrest.  Wm. Harkleroads, Jr., was indicted for manslaughter for shooting Bob Dees, about a year ago.  Sam Broughton, of near Hazel Patch, was indicted for incest.  The only murder that has been tried this court was against Pate Whitley and he was sent up for 16 years.  This is the only conviction.  Several visiting attorneys are present. [] 



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Pulaski.

[] "Murder Confessed." The Courier Journal, Louisville, KY. April 27, 1893. Page 3. Newspapers.com.

[April 27, 1893] -

MURDER CONFESSED.

William Neeley Says He and Four Others Killed Gilson New.

Somerset, Ky., April 26. -- (Special.) -- Seven weeks ago the body of Gilson New was found floating in the south fork of the Cumberland river, about twenty-five miles south of this place. The Coroner's inquest brought to light the fact that New had been the victim of foul play, but no clew could be found, and the New murder case was filed away as a mystery which in all probability would never be solved.

Yesterday William Neeley, who resides near where New's body was found, was arrested in Wayne county for breaking into Leo Dolson's store. He was taken to Monticello and placed in the county jail at that place. The arrest was made by Sheriff John Duncan.

Last night Neeley sent for Sheriff Duncan and made a statement to him which, if true, will clear up the mystery surrounding the Gilson New murder. Neeley says that Tom Tucker, Sam Young, Mose and Jerry Morrow and himself killed Nwe and threw the body into the Cumberland river. The statement caused no end of excitement at Monticello and at New's home.

Neeley says that New was killed to keep him from implicating Mason and John Johnson for the killing of Joseph Keith at Greenwood, this county, seven months ago, for which John Johnson was sent to the penitentiary for a term of two years, and Mason is yet to be tried. The case will be thoroughly investigated by the authorities at this place and the criminals brought to justice. The gang is a desperate one. []



---

[] Excerpt from "Newsy Notes." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. April 28, 1893. Page 4. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1893-04-28/ed-1/seq-4/

[April 28, 1893] -

Wm. Neeley, who is in jail at Monticello for house breaking, says he saw Tom Tucker, Sam Young and Mose and Jerry Morrow kill Gilson New and throw his body into the Cumberland river. The murder has been a mystery. Neeley says that New was killed to keep him from implicating Mason and John Johnson for the killing of Joseph Kieth at Greenwood seven months ago, for which John Johnson was sent to the penitentiary for two years and Mason is yet to be tried. []





---

[] Excerpt from "Newsy Notes." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 12, 1893. Page 4. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1893-05-12/ed-1/seq-4/

[May 12, 1893] -

Thomas Tucker, Sam Young and Mose Morrow, charged with killing Gilson New, were bound over to the grand jury in Pulaski in the sum of $3,000 each. It is alleged that the men were paid $180 to kill New. []




---

[] "On Trial For His Life." The Courier Journal, Louisville, KY. June 30, 1894. Page 2. Newspapers.com.

[June 30, 1894] -

On Trial For His Life.

Somerset, Ky., June 29. -- (Special.) -- Jerry Morrow, charged with killing Jilts New, and throwing his body into the Cumberland river, is now on trial in the Circuit Court. The crime was committed about two years ago, and at the time created no little excitement. Morrow was tried once before, which resulted in a hung jury. Considerable interest is being manifested in the trial. []



---

[] "His Third Trial For Murder." The Courier Journal, Louisville, KY. November 1, 1894. Page 3. Newspapers.com.

[November 1, 1894] -

His Third Trial For Murder.

Somerset, Ky., Oct. 31. -- (Special.) -- Jerry Morrow, charged with the murder of Jils New, is on trial at this place. Jils New disappeared some two years ago, and was found about two weeks after his disappearance floating in the Cumberland river. Marks of violence were found on him, and circumstances pointed to Jerry Morrow as his murderer. Morrow was arrested and this is his third trial, the last two juries having failed to agree. Morrow is a notorious character and has been dreaded for many years in his neighborhood. []



---

[March 1895] -

Jerry Morrow is killed during an attempted train robbery near Greenwood, KY. See Somerset Mayor T. R. Griffin Helps Foil Train Robbery Attempt, Pulaski, 1895 for more information.


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[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon, Rockcastle County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 26, 1893. Page 4. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1893-05-26/ed-1/seq-4/

[May 26, 1893] -

The case against Robt. Cook, charged with murder was dismissed on peremptory instructions of the judge. It will be remembered that Miss Burnett, of the Scaffold Cane neighborhood, committed suicide about a year since. Young Cook was charged with having furnished her with the poison with which she took her life and a grand jury returned an indictment last September. []




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[] Excerpt from "." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 23, 1893. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1893-05-23/ed-1/seq-2/

[May 23, 1893] -

Miss Mary Hardwick, of Science Hill, was shot by unknown parties and placed on a freight train. []




---

[] Excerpt from "." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 30, 1893. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1893-05-30/ed-1/seq-2/

[May 30, 1893] -

Mike Lynch has been named by the coroner's jury at Somerset as the murderer of Mary Hardwick, who was mysteriously shot a week ago. Lynch is a railroad section boss and the woman was of bad reputation. []



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Lincoln. not on timeline

[] Excerpt from "City and Vicinity." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. June 27, 1893. Page 3. LOC.

[June 27, 1893] -

Mack Ferrell was sentenced Saturday. Judge Saufley asked him if he had anything to say why he should not pass sentence and his response was, "I am not satisfied with my trial." The sentence was then passed on him in a few words and was that he be confined at hard labor in the penitentiary for the period of his natural life. It was suspended, however, for 60 days pending an appeal from the lower court, which refused a new trial. There was no appreciable change in the prisoner's countenance during the sentence. He either has great hope or does not realize the gravity of his position. []





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[] Excerpt from "." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. July 4, 1893. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1893-07-04/ed-1/seq-3/

[July 4, 1893] -

Another killing has been added to Lincoln county's distressingly long list and from what we can gather it is a most horrible case of murder. Ike Helm, a well-behaved colored man, was shot and killed by Odie Paul, at McKinney, Saturday evening about 5 o'clock. Paul and a painter named Perry hired a horse and buggy from McAfee & Alford, for which firm Helm worked, and they had driven it very rapidly from Hustonville. Helm remarked that the horse was nearly dead and that they ought not to have driven so rapidly. Perry said that Paul did the driving and that he could see him about it. Helm continued to talk about the horse's condition and Perry says he started at him with a knife, when he, Perry, knocked him down with a chair, making an ugly cut in the forehead and badly fracturing his skull. Mr. William Marksburg, who stays at the stable, seeing that Perry would hurt Helm, pushed him down and out of the way. Paul, who had had nothing to say up to this time, remarked to Helm, "Probably you want to say something to me about the horse." Helm's answer was, "All I've got to say is the horse has been driven almost to death." Paul, with an oath, pulled his 44 Colt's revolver and shot Helm in the left breast, near the heart, from the effects of which he died in less than an hour. Paul, realizing what he had done, took to his heels across a field and thence to the knobs, with a party of citizens close after him. He paid no attention to their "halts," but continued to run, when Joe Carson fired his pistol at him. Even at this he gave only a glance and continued to leave the scene of his awful crime. It was reported here that he had been traced to John Paul's, on Green river, and that the house was guarded while reinforcements were sent for, but he escaped some way and is still at large. Perry was brought to jail here Saturday night by W. M. McAfee and "Dutch" Singleton and will be held till Paul is caught and tried. He is a painter, as has been stated, and claims Charleston, S.C., as his home. Both Paul and Perry were drinking and Perry states that he gave Helm a couple of drinks during the day. If Paul and Helm had had any trouble prior to the killing it is not known. Paul is 25, dark skin and eyes and is about 6 feet tall and was married about a year ago to a Miss Huston, of the West End. Helm was a married man about 30 and leaves besides a wife, several little children. []



---

[] Excerpt from "." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. July 7, 1893. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1893-07-07/ed-1/seq-3/

[July 7, 1893] -

STILL A FUGITIVE. -- Odie Paul, the man who shot Ike Helm at McKinney, an account of which was published in our last issue, is still at large, the efforts of the sheriff and others to apprehend him proving futile. Judge Varnon yesterday applied to the governor to offer a reward for Paul. Perry, who was with Paul at the time of the killing and who is alleged to have fractured Helm's skull with a chair before he was shot, will have his examining trial to-morrow. He is now in jail. []





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[] "To Answer For Murder." The Courier Journal, Louisville, KY. June 26, 1893. Page 1. Newspapers.com.

[June 26, 1893] -


TO ANSWER FOR MURDER.

Three Men Held For Killing Andrew Dolson Near Somerset.

Somerset, Ky., June 25. -- (Special.) -- Yesterday before County Judge James Denlin, Seth Mofield, Sanford Orwin and Beinger Dye were held over to the grand jury without bail for the murder of Andrew Dolson, which occurred the 11th inst. John Dye, Fount Mofield Jr., Thomas Mofield, and Elisha Mofield were held over in the sum of $500 bail as accessories to the killing. The accused are charged with calling Andrew Dolson to his door and shooting him down. Dolson resided about eleven miles west of this place, and was a cousin of the accused. The trial yesterday created some excitement, as the accused all bear good reputations. []


---

[] Excerpt from Column 3. The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. June 27, 1893. Page 1. LOC.

[June 27, 1893] -

Three men have been held for the grand jury without bail and four others placed under bond, charged with killing Andrew Dolson in Pulaski county. []



---

[] "Lack of Evidence." Cincinnati Post, Cincinnati, OH. November 11, 1893. Page 6. Genealogybank.com.

[November 11, 1893] -

LACK OF EVIDENCE.

Grand Jury Ordered to Ignore a Murder Case.

SOMERSET, KY., Nov 11. -- [Special.] -- In the Circuit Court here this morning Judge Morrow ordered the jury to find Seth Mofield and others not guilty of the murder of Andy Dodson. The evidence was purely circumstantial. []




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Whitley county. not on timeline

[] Excerpt from "City and Vicinity." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. July 7, 1893. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1893-07-07/ed-1/seq-3/

[July 7, 1893] -

ONLY THREE KILLED. --  Whisky and pistols are a bad pair to draw on any occasion, especially on the 4th of July when patriotism and the temperature are both at red heat. At a celebration near Woodbine, Tuesday, John Marsee, James Francis and Dempsey Smith, were killed in a row. Joel Mitchell, who is still thought to have done the killing, is still at large. []





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[] Excerpt from "City and Vicinity." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. August 25, 1893. Page 5. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1893-08-25/ed-1/seq-5/

[August 25, 1893] -

Robert Eldridge, who shot John Brinkley in the most cowardly manner at the 4th of July picnic near Mt. Vernon, was captured by Sheriff Watson, of Pulaski, but escaped. The dead man was a cousin of M. F. Brinkley, the drummer, who is using every effort to bring Eldridge to justice. []





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[] Excerpt from "City and Vicinity." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. August 25, 1893. Page 5. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1893-08-25/ed-1/seq-5/

[August 25, 1893] -

Ross Dutton, a bad man from the head waters of Bitter Creek, in Pulaski, was registered at Jailer Owens' hotel Tuesday night. Mr. Dutton was en route to Williamsburg to answer numerous and sundry charges that the grand jury there had seen fit to bring against him. Deputy Sheriff M. E. Barnett kindly came along with Mr. Dutton to keep him company and see that the trip was made in safety. []




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[] Excerpt from "City and Vicinity." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. August 25, 1893. Page 5. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1893-08-25/ed-1/seq-5/

[August 25, 1893] -

T. S. Farris, deputy sheriff of Garrard, was here Wednesday night to get 50 jurors in the Canon Roberts murder case. It will be remembered that he killed the deputy jailer of Madison when he was after his brother for a misdemeanor. []




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[] Excerpt from "London, Laurel County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. October 20, 1893. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1893-10-20/ed-1/seq-2/

[October 20, 1893] -

W. S. Baxter for killing his uncle, John Baxter, was given 21 years. []


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[] "Jeff Arnold's Wound Proves Fatal." The Courier Journal, Louisville, KY. October 26, 1893. Page 1. Newspapers.com.

[October 26, 1893] -


Jeff Arnold's Wound Proves Fatal.

Somerset, Ky., Oct. 25. -- (Special.) -- Jeff Arnold, who was shot several days ago by Jim Ramey and Jess Bullock, died at his home, near Line Creek, last night. Ramey gave himself up to the Sheriff at this place today and is at present under guard. Bullock is still at large. The killing was the outcome of a quarrel. []



---

[] Excerpt from "." Daily Public Ledger, Maysville, KY. October 27, 1893. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86069117/1893-10-27/ed-1/seq-1/

[October 27, 1893] -

Jeff Arnold died from wounds inflicted by James Ramey and Jesse Bullock at his home near Somerset. []




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[] "A Son's Revenge." The Courier Journal, Louisville, KY. November 28, 1893. Page 3. Newspapers.com.

[November 28, 1893] -


A Son's Revenge.

Somerset, Ky., Nov. 27. -- (Special.) -- Dolly Maize [Dooly Mize?] and Robert Sears, of Dallas, this county, became involved in a quarrel yesterday, when Maize shot Sears through the brain, inflicting a serious wound, John Sears, a son of Robert Sears, the wounded man, hunted up Maize and shot him, inflicting a flesh wound. []




---

[] Excerpt from "City and Vicinity." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. November 28, 1893. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1893-11-28/ed-1/seq-3/

[November 28, 1893] -

Marshall Newland got a dispatch yesterday from Judge G. W. McClure, county attorney of Rockcastle, to arrest Dooley Mize, 22 years old, 5 feet 8 inches, 135 pounds, light hair and red complexion, on a charge of murder committed in Pulaski. The marshal searched all the trains yesterday and kept his eye skinned for the man, but failed to catch him. []




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[] "Shooting at Somerset." The Courier Journal, Louisville, KY. October 9, 1893. Page 2. Newspapers.com.

[October 9, 1893] -


SHOOTING AT SOMERSET.

Freight Conductor Trainham Mortally Wounded in His Caboose.

Somerset, Ky., Oct. 8. -- (Special.) -- Late last night, as freight train No. 30 was about to start south and while Conductor S. D. Trainham, aged thirty, was checking up his train, James Crews, of this place, an ex-brakeman, entered the caboose and asked Trainham to take a drink, which offer Trainham refused, after which Crews asked Trainham to go with him. This Trainham also refused to do, and Crews drew his pistol and shot Trainham in the abdomen. Trainham was taken to his home, and is hourly expected to die. Crews was at once arrested and lodged in jail.

Trainham came here three years ago from Virginia, about one year ago married a Miss Smith, of this place. They have one child. Crews is a bad man when in liquor, and has been connected with several bad affrays. Crews denies that he purposely shot Trainham, and says it was an accident. His story is not believed. Trainham states that he and Crews have never had any trouble. Trainham is sinking rapidly, and can not survive the night. []



---

[] "Jim Crews a Murderer." The Courier Journal, Louisville, KY. October 10, 1893. Page 5. Newspapers.com.

[October 10, 1893] -


Jim Crews a Murderer.

Somerset, Ky., Oct. 9. -- (Special.) -- E. D. Trawham, the freight conductor shot at this place Saturday night by Jim Crews, died late last night from the effect of his wounds. Trawham was very popular here, and his death is regretted. Crews, his slayer, is still in jail at this place. Much indignation is expressed against Crews, who will no doubt be given the limit of the law. []



---

[] "Jim Crews' Victim Buried." The Courier Journal, Louisville, KY. October 11, 1893. Page 5. Newspapers.com.

[October 11, 1893] -

Jim Crews' Victim Buried.

Somerset, Ky., Oct. 10. -- (Special.) -- The funeral services of E. D. Trainham were held at the Baptist church at this at this place to-day at 3 p.m. His slayer, Jim Crews, is still in jail. The feeling here against Crews is intense. Trainham was buried with Masonic honors, having been a member of that order at this place. []



---

[] "Jim Crews Bound Over." The Courier Journal, Louisville, KY. October 13, 1893. Page 1. Newspapers.com.

[October 13, 1893] -


Jim Crews Bound Over.

Somerset, Ky., Oct. 12. -- (Special.) -- Jim Crews, who killed Conductor E. B. Trainham, at this place last Saturday night, was yesterday bound over to appear before the grand jury by Judge James Denton, of this place. []



---

[] "Trial of Jim Crews." The Courier Journal, Louisville, KY. November 14, 1893. Page 5. Newspapers.com.

[November 14, 1893] -


Trial of Jim Crews.

Somerset, Ky., Nov. 13. -- (Special.) -- The trial of Jim Crews for the murder of Ed Trainham is in progress here, and is attracting much attention. Crews shot Trainham in his caboose on the Cincinnati Southern railroad at this place about six weeks ago. Crews' defense is insanity. []



---

[] "Jim Crews Escapes the Gallows." The Courier Journal, Louisville, KY. November 15, 1893. Page 3. Newspapers.com.

[November 15, 1893] -


Jim Crews Escaped the Gallows.

Somerset, Ky., Nov. 14. -- (Special.) -- Jim Crews, who murdered Ed Trainham, was to-day found guilty and sentenced to twenty-one years in the penitentiary. Considering the crime, the sentence is thought to be a light one. []



---

[] "Newsy Notes." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. November 17, 1893. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1893-11-17/ed-1/seq-2/

[November 17, 1893] -

At Somerset, Jim Crews, for the murder of Ed Trainham, was given 21 years instead of having his neck broken as he deserved. []




-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

[] Excerpt from "Personal Points." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. September 29, 1893. Page 5. LOC.

[September 29, 1893] -

Judge T. Z. Morrow was on yesterday's train returning to Somerset from his court at Mt. Vernon. He barely had time to sentence the negroes who killed the peddler, for life, and catch the train, after the verdict was rendered. []



---

[] Excerpt from "." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. November 28, 1893. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1893-11-28/ed-1/seq-3/

[November 28, 1893] -

Al Berry, the negro the Rockcastle jury let off with a life sentence for robbing and murdering a peddler, who escaped from the penitentiary, was captured in a straw rick and returned to prison. He escaped by scaling the wall and on being asked how he made his way over it, requested that the officers take him out and let him give an exhibition. He was taken to the perpendicular wall and ascended it to the top with the rapidity of a squirrel. The officers of the penitentiary are talking of making Berry a present of a medal. []






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[] Excerpt from "City and Vicinity." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. February 27, 1894. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1894-02-27/ed-1/seq-3/

[February 27, 1894] -

The Richmond Register explains why James Todd, who was killed by Aurelius Dunn, went by the name of Brown. With a party from Berea, where he was born, he went to Jackson county and became involved in a difficulty. He was arrested and held to the circuit court, but jumped his bail and skipped to Pine Hill, thence to Somerset and finally located near McKinney, in Lincoln county, where he went by the name of James Brown, and was married under that name to a woman who bore him seven children and with whom he was living at the time of his death. His full name was James Brown Todd. []





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[] "Terrible Charge Against a Farmer." The Public Ledger, Maysville, KY. April 16, 1894. Page 3. LOC.

[April 16, 1894] -


Terrible Charge Against a Farmer.

DANVILLE, Ky., April 16. -- John Greenarch, a well-known farmer of Pulaski county, has been arrested and jailed at Jamestown to await trial on the charge of having poisoned his wife in order to be free to marry another woman, with whom he was infatuated. Mrs. Greenarch died several weeks ago without having had medical attention. Suspicion was aroused, the body disinterred, and a post-mortem examination held, which showed unmistakably that the woman had been poisoned. Greenarch ran off with the other woman a few days after his wife's death. []


---

[] Excerpt from "Newsy Notes." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. April 17, 1894. Page 2. LOC.

[April 17, 1894] -

The Columbia Spector says that John Greenarch, of Pulaski, is in jail at Jamestown for poisoning his wife to marry another woman, whom he was eloping with when apprehended. []




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[] Excerpt from "Mt.Vernon, Rockcastle County. The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. June 1, 1894. Page 1. LOC.

[June 1, 1894] -

The trial of Bill Newcum for the murder of Mrs. Burk is in progress to day, Thursday. []



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Sept. 23, 1894. Lincoln. not on timeline

[] Excerpt from "City and Vicinity." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. March 1, 1895. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1895-03-01/ed-1/seq-3/

[March 1, 1895] -

Circuit Court. -- The trial of Will Hale for the murder of George Pennington, for which a jury was being obtained at our last report, began Tuesday morning, the remainder of the jury being obtained out of the 35 men summoned for the purpose. The panel was as follows: John Dinwiddie, Perry White, B. F. Dalton, James G. Gooch, Lee F. Stone, J. T. Jones, Richard Bibb, G. W. Carter, Wm. Stone, W. P. Carson, Sim Perkins and S. M. Helm. The accused was represented by W. H. Miller and Harvey Helm, while J. S. Owsley, Jr., and J. B. Paxton protected the interests of the Commonwealth.

It took until Wednesday afternoon to present all the evidence. The case was tried at the last term of the court and resulted in a hung jury. It will be remembered that the killing occurred on Sunday, Sept. 23, 1894. Pennington was enamored with Mrs. Stamper, a grass widow, and daughter of Wilson Adams. He had been paying her devoted court, much against the wishes of Mr. Adams and when he went to his house on the fatal Sunday morning, he was ordered away by the old man. He left and securing an old  gun was returning, when Hale, who is a son-in-law of Adams, intercepted him and shot him after, he claims, Pennington had shot at him twice. Pennington's dying statement was, however, that he told Hale that his gun had gone off accidentally and not to shoot him as he had nothing against him. The intimacy between the dead man and Mrs. Stamper, who is quite fair to look upon, was proved by love letters from her to him, which were of the most gushing and loving nature. In one of them appears this beautiful and ornate couplet:

Sweet is the man who reads these lines,
How I wish all that sweetness was mines.

During the reading of the letters, Mrs. Stamper sat unmoved and with the utmost nonchalance helped Mr. Owsley to decipher the productions.

After each of the lawyers had made speeches, all of which were complimented, that of Mr. Owsley, being especially praised by the family of the dead man, the case was given to the jury at 3:40 yesterday afternoon.

The jury had not agreed at 5 o'clock and Judge Saufley held them till this morning.

Mrs. Elizabeth Hommel's bond for the appearance of her son, Albert Hommel, which was declared forfeited at the last term of the court, was found to be irregular and proceedings against her dismissed. Albert has not yet shown up. The grand jury has adjourned until Monday, without making any of its works public.

Judge R. J. Breckinridge, Danville, Col. W. O. Bradley and Capt. William Herndon, Lancaster, and Casper C. Williams, Mt. Vernon, are among the visiting attorneys. []



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[] "Boy Killed Over a Game of Marbles." Hazel Green Herald, Hazel Green, KY. June 6, 1895. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86063242/1895-06-06/ed-1/seq-2/

[June 6, 1895] -


Boy Killed Over a Game of Marbles.

At Woodstock, a small place 18 miles from Somerset, Ky., J. J. Thompson and Arthur Todd became involved in a quarrel, when Todd stabbed Thompson in the throat, causing a mortal wound. Thompson lived but a short time after the cutting. Thompson was eighteen years of age and the son of Magistrate John Thompson. Todd is also eighteen years of age and is well connected. The trouble is supposed to have originated over a game of marbles which the boys were playing. Arthur Todd is in the Pulaski county jail and will be given an examining trial before Judge W. M. Catron Saturday. []


---

[] Excerpt from "City and Vicinity." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. July 16, 1895. Page 5. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1895-07-16/ed-1/seq-5/

[July 16, 1895] -

Arthur Todd, who stabbed young Marion Thompson to death at a singing school near Woodstock a couple of weeks ago, was tried at Somerset last week and given 10 years in the penitentiary. Todd is only 16 years old while Thompson was a year his junior. []



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[] Excerpt from "City and Vicinity." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. June 18, 1895. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1895-06-18/ed-1/seq-3/

[June 18, 1895] -

SAVED HIS NECK.  -- Lewis Rector, an ex-convict and notorious horse thief, was lodged in jail at London and Friday night a mob of about 60 men took him out to hang him. They placed a rope around his neck and started to carry out their designs, when the fellow promised to give a big snap away if he were permitted to live. His plea was granted and he made some startling revelations, implicating men who had never before been suspicioned. []





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[] Excerpt from "Kentucky." Daily Public Ledger, Maysville, KY. July 1, 1895. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86069117/1895-07-01/ed-1/seq-2/

[July 1, 1895] -


Shot From Ambush.

SOMERSET, Ky., July 1. -- W. J. Adkins, residing about 15 miles northeast of here, was shot from ambush near his home, the wound proving fatal. Adkins has been a terror to the eastern part of the county for several years. He leaves a family and several children. []


---

[] Excerpt "Of a Local Nature." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. July 16, 1895. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1895-07-16/ed-1/seq-1/

[July 16, 1895] -

Will Jesse Adkins, who was shot from ambush in Pulaski county a short time ago, will probably die of his wounds without revealing the identity of his assassin. []




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[] Excerpt from "City and Vicinity." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. July 16, 1895. Page 5. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1895-07-16/ed-1/seq-5/

[July 16, 1895] -

When Louis Coffey, a young man of 19, attempted to reach the house of Isaac Burnett, near Monticello, to get his daughter to elope with him, he was discovered by Mr. Burnett, who charged him with doing so. Coffey called him a liar and as Burnett approached him drew a pistol. Burnett grabbed for the weapon, which was discharged both balls taking effect in Burnett's body from the effects of which he died after several days suffering. Coffey gave himself up and is now in jail. Burnett was 45 years of age and a highly respected citizens. Coffey's reputation is not so good. He was very much dejected, until he received a message from the girl, who is but 13 years of age, that she would go with him as soon as he got out of jail. []


---

[] Excerpt from "Of a Local Nature." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. July 19, 1895. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1895-07-19/ed-1/seq-3/

[July 19, 1895] -

Louis Coffey has been bound over in the sum of $600 to the Circuit Court to be tried for the killing of Isaac Burnett at Monticello, July 8. []



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[] Excerpt from "Newsy Notes." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. July 19, 1895. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1895-07-19/ed-1/seq-2/

[July 19, 1895] -

Mrs. Nancy Slavens, was murdered and robbed at her home in Wayne county. Some of her grand-children are suspected of the crime. []



---

[] Excerpt from "Of A Local Nature." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. August 9, 1895. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1895-08-09/ed-1/seq-1/

[August 9, 1895] -

Andrew Slavens and his three sons have been arrested in Scott county, Tenn., and returned to Monticello, Ky., charged with murdering and robbing Mrs. Nancy Slavens. []




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[] "Another Killing in Pulaski." The Courier Journal, Louisville, KY. September 17, 1895. Page 5. Newspapers.com.

[September 17, 1895] -

Another Killing In Pulaski.

Somerset, Ky., Sept, 16. -- (Special.) -- A man named Estes shot and killed a young man named Singleton at Eubanks, fifteen miles north of here, Saturday night. Singleton was drinking and raising a row. Estes is now in jail here. []



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osborn, osbourn, osbourne, osborne, southerland, sutherland, sotherland

[] Excerpt from "Of A Local Nature." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. February 21, 1896. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1896-02-21/ed-1/seq-1/

[February 21, 1896] -

At Pittsburg, Wm. Southerland shot and killed William Osborn. Osborn was drunk. Southerland was arrested and taken to London, where he was given an examining trial and allowed bail in the sum of $4,000. [] 




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[] Excerpt from "Somewhat Local." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. July 10, 1896. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1896-07-10/ed-1/seq-1/

[July 10, 1896] -

Near Norwood, Ky., E. M. Smock was found dead on the railroad track. His head had been cut off. Shell Sutherland and Ansel Wilson have been arrested at Cynthiana, charged with the murder. []





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[] "Just Left the Pen." Morning Herald, Lexington, KY. August 11, 1896. Page 4. Genealogybank.com.

[August 11, 1896] -

John Gruarch, who is now confined in [Somerset] jail charged with murder, []




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[] Excerpt from "City and Vicinity." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY.  February 9, 1897. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1897-02-09/ed-1/seq-1/

[February 9, 1897] -

A man named Litteral was arrested at Corbin for the murder of George Baker last summer. Baker was killed and his body placed on the track and run over by a train. while drunk a few days ago Litteral and his wife quarreled. His wife then told that he was the murderer of Baker. He was placed in jail at London. []




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[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY.  February 19, 1897. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1897-02-19/ed-1/seq-2/

[February 19, 1897] -

The grand jury failed to find indictment against G. A. Parker for killing his father. []


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[] Excerpt form "More Pardons." Morning Herald, Lexington, KY. June 29, 1897. Page 3. Genealogybank.com.

[June 29, 1897] -

Inspector Lester left for Somerset, where he goes as attorney for Decker Perkins, on trial on a charge of murder. []


---

[] Excerpt from "News in the Vicinage." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, Ky. April 5, 1898. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1898-04-05/ed-1/seq-1/

[April 5, 1898] -

The jury in the case of John Satterfield for killing Tom Smith in Pulaski failed to make a verdict after being out three days.  Six were for acquittal and six for two years.  Decker Perkins for killing John Holloway was acquitted. []


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[] Excerpt from "Somerset."  Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. September 7, 1897. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1897-09-07/ed-1/seq-1/

[September 7, 1897] -

George Roberts, charged with killing his nephew at Cumberland Falls a few nights ago, was arraigned before Judge Catron Saturday, but the case was continued for lack of witnesses. General opinion is that the deed was done in self-defense. []



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"Henry Burton." Morning Herald, Lexington, KY. December 4, 1897. Page 3. Genealogybank.com.

[December 4, 1897] -

HENRY BURTON

KILLS JOHN SMITH--FATAL TERMINATION OF A QUARREL IN PULASKI COUNTY.

Somerset, Ky., Dec. 3.-- Henry Clay Burton killed John Smith at the home of Mac Smith, on Cumberland river, in the edge of Wayne county, last night about 6 o'clock. The trouble arose over a controversy in regard to some discussion.

Burton immediately made his escape and is still at large. Both parties belong to highly respected families and great excitement prevails. []



---

[] "Murder Over a Game of Cards." Breckenridge News, Cloverport, KY. December 8, 1897. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86069309/1897-12-08/ed-1/seq-1/   (col3)

[December 8, 1897] -

Murder Over a Game of Cards.

Somerset, Ky. Dec. 4. -- In a dispute over a game of cards last night, between Henry Clay Burton and John Smith, Smith was killed. The trouble occurred at the home of Mac Smith, on the Cumberland river, in Wayne county. Both men concerned belong to highly respectable families. Burton made his escape. The country is aroused. []


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[] Excerpt from "." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. November 29, 1898. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1898-11-29/ed-1/seq-1/

[] Excerpt from "." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. October 22, 1897. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1897-10-22/ed-1/seq-3/

Will Tuttle killing John Hamner in Boyle county; "to hades with his boots on"


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some reports say fatal wound, some say murder, but have not found any trial info

[] Excerpt from "Local Happenings." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. February 22, 1898. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1898-02-22/ed-1/seq-3/

[February 22, 1898] -

MURDER.-- Rockcastle had another killing yesterday. A dispatch says that at Mullins Station on the K. C., Geo. Durbin followed John Redwood to a tunnel where he and others were shooting craps and telling Redwood that he had come to kill him, pulled his pistol and fired the fatal shot.  both were K. C. bridge carpenters.  Durbin was arrested and jailed at Mt. Vernon. []



---

[] "He Will Die." Morning Herald, Lexington, KY. February 22, 1898. Page 8. Genealogybank.com.

[February 22, 1898] -

HE WILL DIE

GEO. DURBIN MORTALLY WOUNDS JOHN REDMOND NEAR MT. VERNON.

MT. VERNON, Ky., Feb. 21.-- At Mullins' station this morning, John Redmond was shot and fatally wounded by George Durbin. Durbin and Redmond had a previous difficulty, and the former met Redmond today, when the quarrel was resumed. After telling Redmond he had come to kill him it is said Durbin immediately fired, the ball entering Redmond's breast. Durbin is now in jail. []


---

[] Excerpt from "Local and Otherwise." Mt. Vernon Signal, Mount Vernon, KY. February 25, 1898. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86069561/1898-02-25/ed-1/seq-3/

[February 25, 1898] -


Monday morning, near Withers, in a tunnel, Geo. Durbin shot and dangerously wounded John Redmond.  It appears that they had a falling out the day before. Durham followed Redmond to the tunnel where he found him engaged with others shooting craps.  Durbin said: "I have come to shoot you," and fired.  The ball entered the lower portion of Redmond's breast.  Durbin was brought here and jailed. []








---

[] Excerpt from "State Items of Interest." The Central Record, Lancaster, KY. February 25, 1898. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86069201/1898-02-25/ed-1/seq-2/

[February 25, 1898] -

Fatally Wounded.

RICHMOND, Ky., Feb 22.-- At Mullin's tunnel, a few miles south of here, two L. & N. bridge carpenters, named Durbin and Redmond, became involved in a quarrel, when Durbin shot Redmond, inflicting a fatal wound.  Durbin escaped. []



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[] Excerpt from "Matrimonial Matters." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. March 15, 1898. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1898-03-15/ed-1/seq-1/

[March 15, 1898] -

Unrequited love caused a man at Pittsburg to kill his sweetheart and then himself. []



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[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. March 18, 1898. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1898-03-18/ed-1/seq-2/

[March 18, 1898] -

About 100 people assembled at the sink hole on Skaggs' Creek last Sunday to see Messrs. Marler and Moore descend over 200 feet in search of the remains of an unknown person who was supposed to have been murdered near there. Blood had been found spattered on the fence and coagulated in the road, but the case is yet shrouded in mystery for the bottom of the sink hole was not reached. Some newspaper man could get a sensational article if he would visit this spot with his kodak. []




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[] Excerpt from "Local and Otherwise." Mount Vernon Signal, Mt. Vernon, KY. March 25, 1898. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86069561/1898-03-25/ed-1/seq-3/

[March 25, 1898] -

Deputy Woods Hopkins shot and killed J. F. Robinson, who resisted arrest at Lily last Saturday. []


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

[] Excerpt from "News in the Vicinage." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. April 5, 1898. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1898-04-05/ed-1/seq-1/

[April 4, 1898] -

The grand jury at Somerset returned an indictment against Mrs. Permelia Young charging her with beating Mrs. Rains, an old woman, to death, because she said that Mrs. Young's husband had stolen a sow. The old woman was found terribly beaten in a field and died shortly afterwards. []



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http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~kylinco2/Newspaper_Articles/Stevens_George.htm

(Harrodsburg Democrat, Harrodsburg, Mercer Co, Ky Fri Aug 19, 1898)

"George Stevens, colored, aged 17 years, was hanged at Stanford yesterday morning at 9 o’clock." []


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[] Excerpt from "Local and Otherwise." Mount Vernon Signal, Mt. Vernon, KY. November 4, 1898. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86069561/1898-11-04/ed-1/seq-3/

[November 4, 1898] -

Clate Matthews was shot and instantly killed at Pine Hill on Wednesday afternoon and John Matthews mortally wounded by John Meadows. The difficulty took place on the depot platform over the alleged statement that Matthews had torn down some notices Meadows had tacked upon the school house door where Meadows is teaching. Meadows came to town and surrendered, and examining trial is set for tomorrow at 9 a.m. Judge Williams held an inquest Wednesday night. []






---

[] Excerpt from "Local and Otherwise." Mount Vernon Signal, Mt. Vernon, KY. June 2, 1899. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86069561/1899-06-02/ed-1/seq-3/

[June 2, 1899] -

A jury was secured in the John Meadows case Wednesday morn and was in progress when we went to press. []





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[] Excerpt from "Local and Otherwise." Mount Vernon Signal, Mt. Vernon, KY. February 23, 1900. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86069561/1900-02-23/ed-1/seq-2/

[February 23, 1900] -

The case of John Meadows, charged with the murder of Clayton Mathews, after being well argued by Messrs. Morrow and Bethurum for the defendant, and C. C. Williams and J. N. Sharp for the Commonwealth, resulted in a hung jury which stood one for 15 year, three for 2 years and eight for acquittal. []







---

[] Excerpt from "Circuit Court." Mount Vernon Signal, Mt. Vernon, KY. June 1, 1900. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86069561/1900-06-01/ed-1/seq-3/

[June 1, 1900] -

John Meadows, charge with murder, acquitted; []




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[] Excerpt from "News in the Vicinage." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. November 29, 1898. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1898-11-29/ed-1/seq-1/

[November 29, 1898] -

Charles Marsee, for killing Richard Stapleton at Lily, Laurel county, was held in $5,000, which he gave. []


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[] Excerpt from "Bloodshed in Pulaski." The Courier-Journal, Louisville, KY. June 19, 1899. Page 1. Newspapers.com.

[June 19, 1899] -

James R. Mills shot and fatally wounded Will Tomlinson at Providence meeting-house, this [Pulaski] county, this morning. Mills was brought to this place [Somerset] for safekeeping by a strong guard. Both are mere boys, Mills being only eighteen, and the wounded boy twenty. When interviewed the prisoner stated that he and a friend passed Tomlinson, and he called to him if he wanted anything he could get it, and on Mills paying no attention to him, Tomlinson ran toward him. Mills ran from him and tripped and fell. He fell on his back, and as Tomlinson came up with him Mills pulled his pistol and shot him in the side. It is thought that Tomlinson can not live. A friend of Tomlinson claims that Mills had been bullying a younger brother of Tomlinson. The pistol used was a cheap pattern bulldog. []



---

[] Excerpt from "News of the Vicinage." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. June 20, 1899. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1899-06-20/ed-1/seq-1/

[June 20, 1899] -

Two tragedies are reported in Pulaski. Saturday night at Science Hill, Ross Meece shot John Haynes, from the effects of which he died in a short time. Both were drunk. J. R. Mills, 18, shot Will Tomlinson fatally at Providence church in the most cowardly manner. Both  murderers were captured. []


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[] Excerpt from "Bloodshed in Pulaski." The Courier-Journal, Louisville, KY. June 19, 1899. Page 1. Newspapers.com.

[June 19, 1899] -

BLOODSHED IN PULASKI.

ROSS MEECE SHOOTS AND KILLS JOHN HAYNES.

Two Boys Fall Out Over a Trivial Matter and One of Them Is Fatally Shot.

Somerset, Ky., June 18. -- [Special.] -- Saturday night at Science Hill, about seven miles north of this place, at a country party, Ross Meece and John Haynes, while drunk, got into a difficulty and Meece shot Haynes through the chest. Haynes was brought to the hospital at this place, where he died to-day from the wound. He was kept under the influence of morphine, and no statement could be secured. Young Meece is in jail at this place. [...] statement of a bystander Haynes [...] Meece approached him and Haynes spoke to Meece and called him a vile name. They became engaged in a scuffle, and the bystander heard a pistol fired, but was not able to see who fired it. The pistol was recognized as Haynes' pistol. Meece claims that it was accidental. Young Haynes was a member of the First Kentucky volunteer regiment, and was very popular. He has several brothers in this county. []




---

[] Excerpt from "News of the Vicinage." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. June 20, 1899. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1899-06-20/ed-1/seq-1/

[June 20, 1899] -


Two tragedies are reported in Pulaski. Saturday night at Science Hill, Ross Meece shot John Haynes, from the effects of which he died in a short time. Both were drunk. J. R. Mills, 18, shot Will Tomlinson fatally at Providence church in the most cowardly manner. Both  murderers were captured. []







---

[] Excerpt from "News of the Vicinage." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. July 11, 1899. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1899-07-11/ed-1/seq-1/

[July 11, 1899] -

Ross Meece, who killed John Haynes at Science Hill, was acquitted at Somerset.  The jury in the case of Colyer for killing Catron could not agree and was discharged. []





---

[] "Old Trouble Renewed." The Courier-Journal, Louisville, KY. October 19, 1899. Page 3. Newspapers.com.

[October 19, 1899] -


OLD TROUBLE RENEWED.

William Haynes Shoots Ross Meece, Who Kills Haynes' Brother Last Fall.

Somerset, Ky., Oct. 18. -- [Special.] -- Ross Meece and William Haynes got into a difficulty this morning, which ended in the fatal shooting of Meece by Haynes. The trouble came up in Goodman & Waddel's store at this place. Haynes and his brother went to the back part of the store to get a drink, when they met Ross Meece. Meece, it is alleged, at once picked up a hatchet and started to throw it at Haynes. Haynes called to him not to throw, at the same time drawing his pistol. Meece threw the hatchet, nearly severing Haynes' ear. Haynes then fired three shots, two taking effect in Meece's neck and one in the body. The trouble grew out of the killing by Meece of Haynes' younger brother, at a dance last fall. Neither man was drinking, and both had come to town to the circus, apparently without any thought of a difficulty. Haynes claims that there were no words exchanged, and that as soon as he came in sight Meece picked up the hatchet.

A heavy guard was placed around Haynes, and he was sent to jail, without bail, Police Judge Waddel deeming it unsafe to allow bail, as the excitement was very high in town, and as Meece had several brothers and relatives, who were all in town. []


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[] "Throat Cut." Cincinnati Post, Cincinnati, KY. October 13, 1899. Page 6. Genealogybank.com.

[October 13, 1899] -


THROAT CUT

WIDOW ATTACKED BY A PAIR OF FIENDS.

SOMERSET, KY., Oct. 12. -- (Spl.) At Flat Rock, this county, 23 miles south, on the Cincinnati Southern, Mrs. Mason, a widow, was assaulted and her throat cut by two men, supposed to be white tramps. Mrs Mason has 10 small children. The woods and mountains are being scoured by bodies of men. A lynching is in prospect. Telegrams have been sent here for bloodhounds. []





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[] Excerpts from "Report of Persons Murdered in the State of Kentucky from July 1, 1867 to July 1, 1868." Report of the Secretary of War. Executive Documents of The House of Representatives during the Third Session of the Fortieth Congress, 1868-1869. Pages 191 to ___. Googlebooks.

Report is from a letter by S. Burbank with the Freedmen's Bureau who says it's an incomplete list of murders that have come to the attention of bureau agents.

Victim Name / Complexion / Murderer / Complexion / When / Where / Remarks

Albert L. Jones / White / Dr. Metcalfe / White / Aug --, 1867 / Garrardsburg / No indictment found.

Major J. H. Bridgewater / White / Tom Sanders, et al / White / Jully 18, 1867 / Lincoln County / Acquitted before the examining court. (sep draft post in progress)

Courtney Green / colored / J. Brent Aikin / White / Sept. 1, 1867 / Boyle County / Acquitted by civil court; case carried to U.S. court (in leads)

2 men unknown / White / Unknown / ... / April 30, 1868 / Pulaski county / No arrest

James Cheaney / White / Andrew Decker / White / May --, 1868 / Pulaski county / in jail awaiting trial by civil court. (in reg. draft post)

James Baker / White / Unknown / ... / June 13, 1868 / Pulaski county / No arrest. (in reg. draft post)


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[] Excerpts from "List of Pardons." List of pardons granted by Governor Luke P. Blackburn, from September 3, 1879 to March 23, 1881. Kentucky Legislative Documents, Volumes 2 and 3. Pages 4 through 26. Googlebooks.

Date Pardoned / Name / County / Offense 

Sept. 22, 1879. / A. G. Cosby / Boyle / Manslaughter (in leads)
Sept. 22, 1879. / James Bishop / Whitley / Manslaughter
Oct. 3, 1879. / William McCoy / Garrard / Murder (in leads)
Oct. 8, 1879. / Peter Goff / Rockcastle / Manslaughter (in leads)
Oct. 10, 1879. / T. F. Edwards / Boyle / Manslaughter
Nov. 14, 1879. / E. D. Kennedy / Garrard / Murder (in leads)
Nov. 14, 1879. / Wm. F. Kennedy / Garrard / Murder (in leads)
Dec. 19, 1879. / James J. Richardson / Wayne / Misconduct in office
Jan. 15, 1880. / John Cain / Lincoln / Arson (in leads)
Jan. 23, 1880. / William Mayfield / Garrard / Malicious wounding (in non-fatal)
Mar. 31, 1880. / Thos. J. Stone / Madison / Shooting and wounding
Apr. 12, 1880. / Aquilla Riddell / Pulaski / Manslaughter (in leads)
Apr. 15, 1880. / Shelt. Chambers / Madison / Malicious wounding
Apr. 25, 1880. / Robert Ferrill / Garrard / Concealed weapons
May 5, 1880. / Wm. Johnson / Rockcastle / Horse-stealing &c.
Jun. 14, 1880. / Logan Sally / Wayne / Malicious wounding (in non-fatal)
Aug. 28, 1880. / W. M. Howard / Laurel / Malicious shooting
Dec. 29, 1880. / Samuel Holmes / Pulaski / Manslaughter (view)
Jan. 29, 1881. / Lloyd B. McCurry / Laurel / Horse-stealing
Mar. 1, 1881. / C. K. Humber / Lincoln / Malicious wounding


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[] "Remarkable Contrast in Pardon Records." The Courier-Journal, Louisville, KY. August 29, 1903. Page 2. Newspapers.com.

Name / Crime / Sentence / County / Rec'd / Pardoned

Frankfort Penitentiary by Gov. Beckham
Ellis, Frank / Manslaughter / 21 / Lincoln / July 7, 1896 / May 8, 1900
Daugherty, H. C. / Manslaughter / 2 / Whitley / May 29, 1900 / Sept 13, 1900
Pence, Alex. / Manslaughter / 10 / Madison / July 27, 1899 / Nov 5, 1900
McDowell, Jno. / Murder / Life / Whitley / Oct 23, 1882 / Nov 29, 1900
King, John / Manslaughter / 21 / Whitley / Dec 19, 1893 / Jan 1, 1901
Ferrill, E. M. / Murder / 10 / Lincoln / Oct. 11, 1893 / June 1, 1901

Watkins, Jack / Manslaughter / 2 / Laurel / June 5, 1901 / July 16, 1901 (view)
Johnson, Morgan / Murder / Life / Rockcastle / Aug 25, 1884 / May 23, 1902 (view)
Bryant, J. C. / Manslaughter / 7 / Whitley / April 9, 1901 / Feb 9, 1903
Huffaker, Shelby / Manslaughter / 5 / Wayne / June 25, 1901 / Feb 24, 1903
Philpot, Millard / Manslaughter / 14 / Laurel / October 27, 1902 / March 14, 1903 

Frankfort Penitentiary by Gov. Wm. O. Bradley
Fain, Wm. / Manslaughter / 17 / Rockcastle / Nov 23, 1892 / Dec 24, 1895 (view)
Washington, Geo. / Murder / Life / Whitley / May 5, 1885 / Jan 28, 1896 
Doolin, Wm. R. / Manslaughter / 8 / Pulaski / June 27, 1894 / Mar 26, 1896 (view)
Spradlin, Eli. / Murder / Life / Whitley / Feb 22, 1886 / April 28, 1896
Hammer, John / Manslaughter / 2 / Boyle / Sept 30, 1895 / June 4, 1896
Cane, Pat / Manslaughter / 3 / Boyle / Feb 5, 1895 / July 14, 1896
Norfleet, Wyatt / Manslaughter / 2 / Wayne / Jan 30, 1896 / July 30, 1896 (view)
Coffey, Louis / Manslaughter / 2 / Wayne / Mar 11, 1896 / Aug 15, 1896 (in leads)
Crabtree, Peter / Manslaughter / 5 / Pulaski / Apr 18, 1895 / Sept 5, 1896 (need follow up)
Ward, George / Manslaughter / 5 / Boyle / Feb 1, 1893 / Sept 14, 1896
Woods,  Horace / Manslaughter / 3 / Garrard / Sept 11, 1895 / Sept 16, 1896
Tuttle, Simeon / Manslaughter / 3 / Laurel / Nov 27, 1896 / Dec 3, 1896 (view)
Garth, Mary / Murder / Life / Pulaski / Nov 29, 1893 / Dec 3,1895 
Barclay, Geo / Kukluxing / 3/4 / Rockcastle / June 3, 1896 / Dec 8, 1896
Freeman, John / Manslaughter / 21 / Madison / Sept 30, 1884 / Dec 10, 1896
Young, Charlie / Manslaughter / 2 / Laurel / Feb 23, 1896 / March 16, 1897 
Adams, Jack / Manslaughter / 6 / Rockcastle / Feb 20, 1896 / April 10, 1897 (view)
Clark, Nancy / Concealing Birth of child / 1 / Laurel / May 29, 1897 / June 24, 1897
Tuttle, Alex / Manslaughter / 15 / Laurel / Feb 1, 1896 / June 24, 1897
Bowman, James / Manslaughter / 4 / Whitley / Feb 11, 1895 / Oct 7, (1897?)
Eldridge, Robert / Manslaughter / 5 / Pulaski / June 26, 1897 / Nov 6, 1897 (in leads) 
Davis, Tolbert / Manslaughter / 5 / Pulaski / Nov 29, 1895 / Mar 23, 1898
Jarrett, John / Murder / 3 / Rockcastle / June 10, 1898 / Mar 24, 1899   (view)
Sharp, Albert / Murder / Life / Pulaski / May 1, 1886 / May 22, 1899
Green, Milt / Manslaughter / 5 / Laurel / Feb 27, 1899 / June 20, 1899
Young, Will / Manslaughter / 2 / Whitley / Jan 27, 1899 / Sept 19, 1899 (view)
Cox, Will / Manslaughter / 2 / Whitley / Jan 27, 1899 / Sept 19, 1899 (view)
Kidd, George / Manslaughter / 2 / Whitley / Jan 27, 1899 / Sept 19, 1899 (post)
Reedy, James / Manslaughter / 21 / Whitley / Aug 24, 1897 / Sept 22, 1899
Todd, William / Murder / 30 / Madison / Nov 1894 / Dec 6, 1899 

Eddyville Penitentiary by Gov. Wm. O. Bradley
Ferrell, John / Murder / Life / Lincoln / May 6, 1879 / June 29, 1897 (
Merritt, W. R. / Murder / Life / Pulaski / May 8, 1883 / May 19, 1899  (view)
King, Isham / Murder / Life / Whitley / April 20, 1887 / Feb 29, 1896

Frankfort Penitentiary by Gov. John Young Brown
Dizney, Thos. / Murder / Life / Laurel / Nov 7, 1887 / March 10, 1892 (view)
Wilder, William / Manslaughter / 6 / Madison / Sept 7, 1891 / May 20, 1893
Henry, William / Murder / Life / Pulaski / May 14, 1884 / Aug 29, 1894 
Fee, Granville / Murder / Life / Whitley / Oct 8, 1891 / July 3, 1895
Powl, Odie / Manslaughter / 8 / Lincoln / May 30, 1894 / Sept 24, 1895
Miller, William / Manslaughter / 4 / Boyle / February 1, 1893 / November 18, 1893
Morris, Robert / Manslaughter / 12 / Laurel / May 2, 1889 / Dec 6, 1893 (view)

Eddyville Penitentiary by Gov. John Young Brown
Coyle, Henry / Murder / Life / Pulaski / [blank] / [blank] (view)
Embry, James / Murder / Life / Lincoln / Nov 27, 1884 / Nov 13, 1893
Jones, C. Z. / Manslaughter / 3 / Pulaski / Oct 22, 1890 / Apr 24, 1893 (view)
Minor, A. F. / Murder / Life / Lincoln / Aug 17, 1883 / November 29, 1893
Leavell, G. / Manslaughter / 15 / Garrard / Sept 2, 1890 / Sept 13, 1893
Smith, Lewis C. / Manslaughter / 12 / Whitley / July 23, 1889 / Aug 20, 1893
Brooks, Richard / Murder / Life / Madison / June 27, 1879 / Nov 13, 1895





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